F1 flashback: 20 years since the crazy 1994 German Grand Prix (VIDEO)

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It’s been 20 years since one of the most bizarre German Grands Prix on record, the 1994 edition won by Gerhard Berger for Ferrari.

Held at the old Hockenheimring, prior to the shorter, chopped new version that came into being in 2002, the weekend saw the V12 Ferraris produce an utterly dominant weekend on the 4-plus mile circuit known for incredibly long straights, where horsepower was king.

Berger and Jean Alesi locked out the front row ahead of championship rivals Damon Hill and Michael Schumacher. Schumacher was racing on home soil with a controversy hanging over his head after his British Grand Prix moment where he’d passed Hill on the formation lap.

While the Ferraris got away cleanly off the start (go to 3:33), there was a diabolical mess behind them with 10 cars eliminated either at the start/finish line or into Turn 1. McLaren’s Mika Hakkinen got a one-race suspension for the accident and was replaced at the following GP in Hungary by Philippe Alliot.

Those 10 were eliminated there with Alesi retiring at the end of the first lap with electrical issues. A throttle issue for Ukyo Katayama’s Tyrrell made for another retirement.

On Lap 16, one of the few who’d survived the first lap fracas, Benetton’s Jos Verstappen, had what became his most memorable moment in Formula One history. The Dutchman was engulfed in a fireball after a refueling stop went awry; NBC Sports Group analyst Steve Matchett was actually involved in that pit stop, having been a Benetton mechanic at the time, and recalled the moment during a SPEED “Formula 1 Decade” rebroadcast of the 1994 German GP during the 2004 season (see below).

Verstappen’s retirement brought the field down to just 13 runners left after 26 had started, and more retirements were to come. David Coulthard’s Williams had an electrical issue; Martin Brundle’s McLaren-Peugeot and Schumacher’s Benetton-Ford both had engine failures.

The 10 remaining runners included of all cars, both Ligier-Renaults, Footwork-Fords, Larrousse-Fords and Simtek-Fords.

Berger continued up front untroubled en route to a popular victory, Ferrari’s first since Alain Prost’s at the 1990 Spanish Grand Prix at Jerez, nearly four years earlier. International commentary is linked, but the V12 Ferrari is glorious.

Behind him it was a day for the underdogs, with Olivier Panis and Eric Bernard leading the way in scoring their first (and in Bernard’s case, only) career podiums for Ligier. Christian Fittipaldi and Gianni Morbidelli drove their Footworks to fourth and fifth, and Erik Comas brought the Larrousse home in sixth. Teammate Olivier Beretta recorded his best ever F1 finish of seventh, just shy of the points, with Hill eighth.

The dream of Simtek scoring points ended when David Brabham had a clutch failure and Jean-Marc Gounon an engine failure in the final 10 laps. They were retirements but Gounon (ninth) and Brabham (10th) were still among the top-10 at the end of the day.

For a modern-day comparison of what this kind of shock result would be like, it would be akin to… well… Ferrari winning the 2014 German Grand Prix with a down-on-performance chassis, say Lotus coming second and third with Romain Grosjean and Pastor Maldonado, Sauber ending fourth and fifth with Adrian Sutil and Esteban Gutierrez, and Marussia bagging sixth and seventh with Jules Bianchi and Max Chilton.

Put simply, that ain’t gonna happen. And that’s why the 1994 German GP stands out so much, because it was such an odd, abnormal day of motor racing.

With 200 IndyCar wins in the books, Penske looks for No. 201 at Indy

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The history of Team Penske at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway is a storied one that features 16 Indy 500 wins, including a pair of four-time winners in Al Unser and Rick Mears, and number of utterly dominant performances.

Yet, they’ll head to this year’s 102nd Running of the Indianapolis 500 looking to avenge a pair of relatively subpar performances in each of the last two years.

Power was the only Penske driver to finish in the Top 10 in 2016, with Helio Castroneves and Simon Pagenaud finishing 11th and 19th after fuel strategy intervened late in the race. And last year, all the Penske cars were somewhat down on pace compared to other teams, notably the Honda cars.

Power was the only Penske driver to qualify for the Fast Nine Pole Shootout last year – he qualified ninth. Juan Pablo Montoya and Helio Castroneves were 18th and 19th in the grid, while Josef Newgarden and Simon Pagenaud were 22nd and 23rd.

And only Castroneves was in winning contention in the final laps as he battled eventual winner Takuma Sato – Montoya was sixth, while Pagenaud was 14th and the only other Penske running at the end. Both Newgarden and Power crashed out on Lap 183.

This year, however, could see a return to the dominant form we’re used to seeing from the Penske outfit. All four cars entered – Pagenaud, Power, Newgarden, and Castroneves – qualified inside the top nine, with Pagenaud and Power on the front row.

They have all been near the front of the time sheets, especially in laps without a tow from another car, and the indication is that the Penske cars may be the fastest ones in the field.

All told, it leads to very high expectations for a team that already expects highly of itself.

Leading the way for Penske is current points leader and defending IndyCar champion Josef Newgarden. Newgarden’s best Indy 500 finish is third in 2016, but he only has one other Top 10 there – ninth in 2015.

But, with an IndyCar title now under his belt, Newgarden has his eyes set on an Indy 500 win.

Josef Newgarden looks to add an Indy 500 crown to his 2017 championship. Photo: IndyCar

“I think Indianapolis…is certainly next on the list for me,” he detailed in a press conference ahead of qualifying. “It’s not next on the list for the team, they’ve won it many times. The good thing is we have four great opportunities, especially having Helio back. I think we have one of the best opportunities in the entire field to win this race.”

Pagenaud, like Newgarden, is also looking for his first Indy triumph, though his record there isn’t quite as good. He has been fast at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, but only has two Top 10s to show for it – eighth in 2013 with Schmidt Peterson Motorsports and tenth in 2015 in his first year with Penske.

And a Pagenaud win would be somewhat historic – it would be only the fourth time a French driver has won the “500,” and the first since 1920 (Gaston Chevrolet).

Pagenaud explained that this race always holds a place as a top priority, and that success at Indy is all about preparation.

Simon Pagenaud looks to become only the first French driver to win an Indy 500 since Gaston Chevrolet in 1920. Photo: IndyCar

“It really is our number one goal. In Roger and Tim’s heart, it’s the most important one,” Pagenaud declared. “We prepare really hard. The team does a fantastic job at just understanding every bit and component of this new aero kit, trying to extract the best out of the equipment.”

Pagenaud added, “On the driver side, there’s a lot you can do obviously to review the past races, try to focus yourself, try to put yourself into the race before it happens, try to just improve. That’s what we try to do every day. That’s the goal. That’s why this group is so good. We push each other so hard that you always try to push the limits away.”

Power, the man who delivered Penske his 200th IndyCar win, is no stranger to success at IMS, having won the Grand Prix on the IMS Road Course three times. But, he is yet to find Victory Lane on the oval, and that leaves a void in an otherwise stellar career.

Will Power has won the INDYCAR Grand Prix three times, and looks for his first win at the “500” this weekend. Photo: IndyCar

Power spotlighted the opportunity in front of him, and detailed that running in traffic has been a strength thus far through practice.

“It’s fantastic to have that opportunity. Obviously very focused on (trying to win),” he revealed. “I feel like we have a really good opportunity to win this year. I mean, I think Chevrolet has brought a really good engine. I feel like we’re really fast. Running in traffic and such, I felt like we’ve been pretty strong, especially when you get to the front.”

Castroneves is the only Penske driver with Indy 500 wins on his resume. But, with three wins to his name, Castroneves is more than familiar with IMS glory.

Now a part-time IndyCar driver who races full-time in the IMSA WeatherTech Sports Car Championship with the Acura Team Penske outfit, Castroneves’ sole focus is on getting that elusive fourth win.

Helio Castroneves looks to join the four-time winners club at the Indy 500. Photo: IndyCar

And he has momentum on his side too, coming off a debut IMSA win for the Acura Penske outfit at the Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course. A fourth Indy 500 win would put an exclamation point on the month for Castroneves.

“I think about it every day,” he said when asked about how often he ponders getting that fourth win. “It was one of those incredible ones, I have phenomenal car, the Pennzoil car was really strong last year. Obviously coming back here, first of all, I want to thank Roger and (team president Tim Cindric) for giving me the opportunity to be back at the Indy 500. It’s such a special place for so many people. Just to be back and able to continue our goal and pursue for the number four, it’s incredible.”

Pagenaud and Power will flank pole sitter Ed Carpenter on the front, starting second and third respectively. Newgarden starts fourth, while Castroneves will start eighth.

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