In racing and in soccer, Germany’s success perpetuates

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HOCKENHEIM, GERMANY – Being a German sports fan at the moment must be pretty great. Not only has your national soccer team just won the FIFA World Cup, but you have a German driver and a German team leading the F1 world championships.

Mercedes has dominated proceedings so far this season, and although the fight between Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg is set to rage on this year, the advantage currently lies with the latter by four points.

In fact, since the turn of the century, there have been just three championship victories that have no relation to Germany: Fernando Alonso’s titles in 2005 and 2006 with Renault, and Kimi Raikkonen’s victory in 2007 with Ferrari. Michael Schumacher won every championship from 2000 to 2004; Sebastian Vettel secured four titles on the bounce between 2010 and 2013; Lewis Hamilton and Jenson Button won their titles in 2008 and 2009 using Mercedes-powered cars.

Frankly, it is a staggering record. Even if you look at soccer, there is a clear pattern of success as this golden generation comes to the fore. Bayern Munich has become one of the most dominant club teams in the world, winning the UEFA Champions League in 2013, and Germany’s World Cup win wasn’t exactly surprising – they had the best team, consensus suggests – and the dismantling of Brazil will go down as one of the great all-time soccer games.

The feeling in Germany at the moment is wonderful. Being English, I’ve never had the chance to revel in a World Cup win (1966 was quite a bit before my time), so it is interesting to come to a country that is doing exactly that. There is World Cup fever still almost a week since the final. German flags are still draping from buildings and are stuck to car windows; German football shirts are being worn on every street corner; even Coca-Cola has branded its cans with names such as “Bastian” and “Mesut” in honor of the victorious players.

You only have to look at the parade that took place in Berlin following the final. The nation is unified – quite literally in the sense that this was the first World Cup win not as West Germany – by success.

And the same can be said for Formula 1 at the moment. Sebastian Vettel went from a “crash kid” (to quote one team principal) to champion of the world four times over, and is perhaps one of the greatest we have ever seen. Nico Rosberg has stepped out of his compatriot’s shadow, and is now putting the dominant Mercedes W05 Hybrid to good use in his first bid for a world championship. German engineering is dominating in both F1 – Mercedes – and in endurance racing. Audi has won 13 of the last 15 24 Hours of Le Mans races, and Porsche’s return to the LMP1 class has also been successful.

Back in F1, Nico Hulkenberg is one of the most underrated drivers on the grid, and is sniffing at a move to Ferrari in the near future. Adrian Sutil has been solid if unspectacular, and other drivers such as Timo Glock and Nick Heidfeld have podiumed in the past. Then, of course, we have the greatest: Michael Schumacher. 91 race wins, seven world championships, and a statistical record that is second to none.

So what is it that causes Germany’s racing success to perpetuate? Much of it comes down to the last name on that list: Schumacher. “For us, we’re the generation after Michael and Michael was a big inspiration,” explained Vettel on Thursday. “So for sure, when Michael made Formula 1 really a sport in Germany and made it big, a lot of fathers with their sons went to the go-kart tracks and wanted to do like him.

“I think it’s chances. In the end, if you have a thousand kids trying rather than ten, the chances that one or two end up in Formula 1 are obviously a lot greater.”

Brazilian driver Felipe Massa made a quick getaway from testing last week so he could see the match against Germany. Naturally, our first question in jest to him was “have you recovered from the result?”. He laughed and smiled, but then went on to make some very interesting points about Germany’s recent success both on the track and on the soccer pitch.

“If you see how Germany rests and how Germany is preparing everything on the sport, about Formula 1, about the World Cup, about the other categories,” he began. “It’s the country that has the most drivers racing. It’s the country that has more championships as well.

“In the football as well, the job they did was brilliant, amazing, the preparation, the way they worked.

“I think it’s something we need to learn and we need to always try and improve, but definitely we expect – by being Brazilian, by playing the World Cup at home – to be in the final fighting, and we were not, so now we need to concentrate to improve things for the future.”

After all, it was meant to be Brazil’s World Cup to win; the sixth star. Instead, it fell apart in the semi-final at the hands of Joachim Löw’s squad.

Massa’s point about Brazil needing to play catch-up is also relevant in racing. The nation has a wonderful heritage in motorsport, but if Massa were to leave F1 and not be replaced by a fellow countryman, it would be the first time in over 40 years that there has not been a Brazilian driver in the sport. Felipe Nasr is the only Brazilian of note coming through the junior ranks, currently racing in GP2, but there are few other than him.

Instead, there are a number of European h youngsters coming through the ranks that are attracting attention: Sainz, Ocon, Marciello and Vandoorne to name just four. Germany also has one to watch for the future in the shape of Marvin Kirchhofer in GP3. It’s all down to preparation.

The good feeling in Germany is set to last for some time following the national team’s victory in Brazil. However, one eye will unquestionably be on the future; how can the team continue to grow and develop in order to create a legacy?

The same will be on the mind of the management at Mercedes. It is an inevitability that the German marque will win the constructors’, and one of its drivers will definitely win the main title. However, it cannot go down as a flash-in-the-pan success like we saw with Renault in 2005 and 2006. The groundwork was made in the years leading up to Fernando Alonso’s title wins, but it did not go beyond that when he left for McLaren. Mercedes has a perfect opportunity to lay down a Ferrari-esque streak (2000-2004) and create a legacy in F1 with Rosberg and Hamilton leading its charge.

Germany’s sporting scene is in superb shape right now. However, with expectation comes pressure – will the weight prove to be too much for Nico Rosberg this weekend at Hockenheim? A win for Lewis would put the momentum firmly in his direction as we pass the halfway point in the championship.

For Germany, now is about letting the good times roll and the party atmosphere continue. The fans at Hockenheim have their tents up in the woods around Hockenheim, and following the example set by his soccer-playing compatriots, all eyes will be on Nico Rosberg to step up to the plate this weekend.

2023 Rolex 24 at Daytona: Schedule, TV info, start times, entry lists, notable drivers, more

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The new year brings the start of a new era for the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship, which will open the 2023 schedule with the 61st running of the Rolex 24 at Daytona.

A new premier class for prototypes is the overriding story entering the 24-hour endurance race that unofficially kicks off the major-league racing season.

The new Le Mans Daytona hybrid (LMDh) cars of the Grand Touring Prototype (GTP) top category will re-establish a bridge to the 24 Hours of Le Mans while bringing a new layer of engine electrification to IMSA.

With at least a few of the cars on the grid at Daytona also slated to race at Le Mans in June, it’s possible for the first time in decades (since the “Ford vs. Ferrari” battles) to have the same car win the overall title at Daytona and Le Mans.

The GTP category will feature four manufacturers, two of which are new to IMSA’s premier division. Porsche Motorsport (with Team Penske) and BMW (with Rahal Letterman Lanigan) will be fielding LMDh prototypes, joining (now-defunct) DPi category holdovers Acura (Meyer Shank Racing, Wayne Taylor Racing) and Cadillac (Chip Ganassi Racing, Action Express Racing).

Here’s what else you need to know ahead of the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship season opener Jan. 29-30 at Daytona International Speedway:


NOTABLE DRIVER ADDITIONS 

The Rolex 24 will feature 10 active drivers from the NTT IndyCar Series, including the IMSA debuts of Team Penske drivers Josef Newgarden and Scott McLaughlin, who will be teamed in an LMP2 entry (teammate Will Power unfortunately had to withdraw from this debut).

Colton Herta will move into the GTP category with Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing. Helio Castroneves and Simon Pagenaud return with Meyer Shank Racing to defend their overall 2022 Rolex 24 victory. Scott Dixon also returns in the premier category with Chip Ganassi Racing for his 20th Rolex 24 start and third consecutive in the No. 01 Cadillac.

Other IndyCar drivers in the field: Romain Grosjean will make his debut in GTD Pro with Iron Lynx Racing (as a precursor to driving a GTP Lamborghini next year); Devlin DeFrancesco (Rick Ware Racing) and Rinus VeeKay (TDS Racing) are in LMP2; and Kyle Kirkwood will return in GTD with Vasser Sullivan.

Daytona 500 winner Austin Cindric also will return, teaming with DeFrancesco in an LMP2 entry for Rick Ware Racing.


CAR COUNT

The Rolex 24 field was capped at 61 cars, matching last year’s field (which was the largest since 2014). The field was capped because of the space limitations for the LMDh cars of GTP in the pits and garages.

Click here for the official 2023 Rolex 24 at Daytona entry list.


STARTING LINEUP

Tom Blomqvist captured the first pole position of the GTP era, qualifying defending race winner Meyer Shank Racing in first with the No. 60 ARX-06 Acura that he shares with Colin Braun, Helio Castroneves and Simon Pagenaud.

The No. 7 Porsche 963 of Porsche Penske Motorsports will start second.

Click here for the 2023 Rolex 24 at Daytona starting lineup


RACE BROADCAST

The 61st Rolex 24 at Daytona will be streamed across the NBC Sports AppNBCSports.com and Peacock, which will have coverage of the event from flag to flag.

Broadcast coverage of the race coverage will begin Saturday, Jan. 28 at 1:30 p.m. ET on NBC and move to USA Network from 2:30-8 p.m. and then will be exclusively on Peacock and IMSA.TV from 8-10 p.m. Coverage will return to USA Network from 10 p.m. to midnight and then move to Peacock/IMSA.TV until 6 a.m.

From 6 a.m. until noon on Sunday, Jan. 29, Rolex 24 coverage will be available on USA Network. The conclusion of the Rolex 24 will run from noon through 2 p.m. on NBC.

HOW TO WATCH IMSA ON NBC SPORTS: Broadcast schedule for 2023

Other events that will be streamed on Peacock from Daytona during January (all times ET):

Jan. 21: IMSA VP Racing Sports Car Challenge, 2:05 p.m.

Jan. 22: IMSA VP Racing Sports Car Challenge, 12:20 p.m.

Jan. 22: IMSA Rolex 24 qualifying, 1:25 p.m.

Jan. 27: BMW Endurance Michelin Pilot Challenge, 1:45 p.m.


ROLEX 24 COVERAGE FROM NBC SPORTS

Roger Penske, Chip Ganassi take their storied rivalry to a new level at Daytona

Pfaff Motorsports returns to Rolex 24 in premier parking spot punching above its weight

Cadillac, Acura battle for top of the speed charts

Herta, Rahal team up with BMW in pursuit of overall win at Rolex 24

Wayne Taylor Racing takes a step up to the next level with Andretti Autosport

Austin Cindric seeks to join legendary club of Rolex 24-Daytona 500 winners

Helio Castroneves recalls “Days of Thunder” moment in 2022 Rolex 24 victory

The “Bus Bros” tackle the “Bus Stop” for Rolex 24 at Daytona debuts

Romain Grosjean adds Rolex 24 at Daytona to his crown jewel career

Tom Blomqvist beats the clock to win Rolex 24 at Daytona pole position

GTP cars make debut in “Gymkhana”-level traffic

Five things to watch in the new GTP class as a golden era of sports cars returns

Cadillac unveils paint schemes for LMDh cars

Austin Cindric, Devlin DeFrancesco, Pietro Fittipaldi teaming up in LMP2

IndyCar drivers in the 61st Rolex 24


ROLEX 24 DAILY SCHEDULE, START TIMES

Here’s a rundown of everything happening at Daytona International Speedway over the last two weeks in January, starting with the Roar test session. Rolex 24 start times and full schedule:

Wednesday, Jan. 18

7 a.m.: GTP garages open

4 p.m.: Non-GTP garages open

4 p.m.: IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship haulers load-in (park only)

6:30 p.m.: Non-GTP garages close

9:30 p.m.: GTP garages close

Thursday, Jan. 19

7 a.m.: Garages, IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship haulers open

8:30 a.m.: IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship safety inspection

10 a.m.: Rolex 24 Media Day

2 p.m.: Michelin Pilot Challenge driver and team manager briefing

3 p.m.: IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship driver and team manager briefing

5:15 p.m.: Track walk

7:30 p.m.: Non-GTP garages close

9:30 p.m.: GTP garages close

Friday, Jan. 20

7 a.m.: Garages open

8:45-9:15 a.m.: VP Racing SportsCar Challenge practice

9:30-10:45 a.m.: Michelin Pilot Challenge practice

11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship practice

1:45-2:15 p.m.: VP Racing SportsCar Challenge practice

2:30-4 p.m.: Michelin Pilot Challenge practice

4:15-6 p.m.: IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship practice (GTD/LMP3/LMP2 4:15-5:45; 4:30-6: GTD Pro, GTP)

8 p.m.: Non-GTP garages close

9:30 p.m.: GTP garages close

Saturday, Jan. 21

7 a.m.: Garages open

8:40-9:15 a.m.: VP Racing SportsCar Challenge qualifying

9:30-11 a.m.: Michelin Pilot Challenge practice

11:15 a.m.-12:45 p.m.: IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship practice

2:05-2:50 p.m.: VP Racing SportsCar Challenge, Race 1 (streaming on Peacock)

3:10 p.m.: IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship practice

4:30-5:30 p.m.: Michelin Pilot Challenge practice

6:30-8:30 p.m.: IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship practice

10 p.m.: Garages close

Sunday, Jan. 22

7 a.m.: Garages open

10:15-11:15 a.m.: Michelin Pilot Challenge practice

12:20-1:05 p.m.: VP Racing SportsCar Challenge, Race 2 (streaming on Peacock)

1:25-3 p.m.: IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship Rolex 24 qualifying (streaming on Peacock)

8:30 p.m.: Garages close

Wednesday, Jan. 25

6 a.m.: Garages open

7:30-10 a.m.: IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship safety inspection, non-GTP

8 a.m.: Mazda MX-5 load-in

10-11:30 a.m.: Track walk

10 a.m.-noon: IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship car photos

11:30 a.m.: Michelin Pilot Challenge team manager briefing

Noon: IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship team manager briefing

12:30 p.m.: IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship new driver briefing

Noon-2 p.m.: IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship safety and technical inspection, non-GTP

1:45-2:30 p.m.: Mazda MX-5 practice

2:45-3:45 p.m.: Michelin Pilot Challenge practice

2:30-7:30 p.m.: IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship safety inspection, GTP only

4-5:30 p.m.: Track walk

6:45 p.m.: Garages close

Thursday, Jan. 26

7 a.m.: Garages open

9-9:30 a.m.: Mazda MX-5 practice

9:45-10:45 a.m.: Michelin Pilot Challenge practice

11:05 a.m.-12:35 p.m.: IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship practice

12:55-1:10 p.m.: Mazda MX-5 qualifying

2:25-3 p.m.: Michelin Pilot Challenge qualifying

3:20-5:05 p.m.: IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship practice (3:20-5:05: GTD, LMP3, LMP2; 3:35-5:05: GTD Pro, GTP)

5:30-6:15 p.m.: Mazda MX-5, Race 1

7:15-9 p.m.: IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship practice

10:15 p.m.: Garages close

Friday, Jan. 27

7 a.m.: Garages open

9:25-9:55 a.m.: Michelin Pilot Challenge practice

10:15-11 a.m.: Mazda MX-5, Race 2

10:30 a.m.: Michelin Pilot Challenge driver and team manager briefing

11:20 a.m.-12:20 p.m.: IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship practice

1:45-5:45 p.m.: BMW M Endurance Challenge at Daytona (Michelin Pilot Challenge; streaming on Peacock)

8:45 p.m.: Garages close

Saturday, Jan. 28

6:30 a.m.: Garages open

9:45 a.m.: IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship driver and team manager briefing

12:30-12:40 p.m.: Rolex 24 engine warmup

1:30-1:40 p.m.: Rolex 24 formation laps

1:40 p.m.: The 61st Rolex 24 at Daytona (starting on NBC; streaming flag to flag on Peacock)

Sunday, Jan. 29

1:40 p.m.: Finish of the 61st Rolex 24 at Daytona

7:30 p.m.: Garages close