IndyCar Race 1 from Toronto postponed due to rain; revised Sunday schedule released (UPDATED)

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9 p.m. ET – We also have a channel change now confirmed for Race 1 on Sunday in Toronto. That will be airing on CNBC after the Formula One German Grand Prix. Coverage of IndyCar Race 2 will start at 3 p.m. ET on NBCSN.

8:30 p.m. ET – A change has been made on the length of tomorrow’s two Verizon IndyCar Series races. Instead of 75 laps as initially stated, each race will run 65 laps or 80 minutes, whichever comes first.

A full Sunday schedule has now been released for all series in Toronto, as tweeted here by More Front Wing. All times are ET:

7:10 p.m. ET – We have an update on at least the IndyCar portion of the schedule for Sunday.

Race 1 will have a green flag at 10:30 a.m. ET, with a rolling start and the grid set by the qualifying positions as were qualified (Sebastien Bourdais on the pole). Cars 2 (Juan Pablo Montoya), 8 (Ryan Briscoe) and 12 (Will Power) will retain their original starting positions, as the race never technically started. They were due to incur penalties and be sent to the back.

Race 2 will have a green flag at 4:15 p.m., with a standing start and the grid set by entrant points entering the weekend (Helio Castroneves will be on pole). Both races will air on NBCSN.

The remaining schedule for support series races will be determined next.

6:25 p.m. ET – Persistent rains have forced IndyCar to postpone today’s Race 1 of the Honda Indy Toronto doubleheader after two red flags and several incidents.

A revised schedule for tomorrow, which was to feature a second, 85-lap race for the Verizon IndyCar Series, will be released shortly.

All but three drivers were going to start today’s race on the Firestone alternate “red” slick tires, but steady pre-race showers caused IndyCar to declare the race as a wet start, putting the drivers on rain tires.

The rain appeared to pick up even further during pace laps and a pre-emptive red flag was waved due to driver visibility issues. Graham Rahal, who started in Row 8, had this to say over his Rahal Letterman Lanigan team’s radio:

Cars were released back to the teams for a 10-15 minute period in which adjustments could be made to them before they went back out. Race Control also decided that because of conditions, the standing start would be abandoned in favor of a single-file rolling start.

But after the first red flag ended and the field came back out to the track for another set of pace laps, several incidents occurred.

Ryan Briscoe went into the tires at Turn 5 but was able to reverse and keep going – albeit at the cost of his starting spot. Then after the field got the one-to-go signal, the Honda pace car slid and spun off-course at Turn 3.

The pace car then pulled off early, but as the field was heading for the green flag, Will Power lost control in Turn 10 and slammed into the inside wall.

Race Control declared no start as Power’s No. 12 Team Penske crew pushed his wounded car back to their pit box for rear suspension repairs.

But when a second red flag came out just before 5 p.m. ET, that proved to be a lucky break for Team Penske, which was allowed to continue working on repairing Power’s car.

A few minutes after 5:30 p.m. ET, the No. 12 was spotted being rolled back to pit road.

Not everyone was happy about that, with Andretti Autosport team owner Michael Andretti telling NBCSN that it was a violation of the rules.

“If this thing goes green, we’re gonna have to talk about it,” said Andretti at the time. “Because they basically allowed them to work on their car when nobody else was allowed to touch their cars. So why are they having an exception over the rest of the cars in the field?

“It’ll be interesting, if this thing does goes green, what the rest of the field [thinks] – I’m sure we’re not the only ones that feel that way about it. Stay tuned.”

However, since the No. 12 crew was allowed to make repairs under the red, Power had to start the race from the rear of the field, not his second-place qualifying position.

Still, Power – who sits just nine points behind teammate Helio Castroneves for the top spot in the Verizon IndyCar Series championship – was happy that his team was able to repair his car after his mistake.

“What’s the chance of that – my guys did a phenomenal job,” Power told NBCSN. “And the time that they got that thing fixed! It’s unbelievable to be sitting back in pit lane.”

Also due to be starting from the rear was Briscoe (because of his earlier run-in with the Turn 5 tires) and Juan Pablo Montoya, who qualified 11th. IndyCar eventually explained why Montoya was being sent to the rear:

During this second red flag, IndyCar also said that the race distance would be shortened to 65 laps or 90 minutes, whichever came first.

However, since the schedule is now being revised for Sunday, it’s unknown if this part will be carried over.

Davison, Daly, Kaiser, highlight underdogs of Indy 500 qualifying

Photo: IndyCar
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James Davison and Kyle Kaiser had uphill battles ahead of qualifying for the 102nd Running of the Indianapolis 500.

Davison, in a one-off joint effort involving A.J. Foyt Racing, Jonathan Byrd’s Racing, and Belardi Auto Racing, appeared to have enough speed to make the “500” field, but a crash on “Fast Friday” put all those hopes in big jeopardy as the team needed to scramble to repair the No. 33 Jonathan Byrd’s Chevrolet in time for qualifying.

However, thanks to a herculean effort that saw the team stay at the track until the early hours of Saturday morning, the car was repaired in time for qualifying, and the team survived a chaotic final hour that saw Conor Daly, James Hinchcliffe, and Pippa Mann all vying alongside them for the final two spots in the field.

In the end, Davison survived the bumping to make the 33-car field, taking the 33rd and final spot in Saturday, and saw a dramatic increase in speed on Sunday to average 226.255 mph, putting him a very solid 19th on the grid.

An emotional James Davison walks back into Gasoline Alley after making the Indianapolis 500 field on Saturday. Photo: IndyCar

“It’s been an incredible weekend for the team after our mishap on Friday,” Davison revealed after Sunday’s qualifying.

He continued, “We had to endure a very long night, obviously it’s always depressing when you have a crashed car around here. We punched above our weight on bump day, and got ourselves in, but didn’t show our hand. We really laid it down on pole day to move from 33rd to 19th. It’s basically two days in a row the team has been rewarded for their hard work, making the show and moving up 14 positions on the grid. Unexpected results are always really nice in motorsports and we got that today with our improvement, substantially. Just very proud of the entire team and want to keep the momentum going next week.”

Conor Daly, too, had a stressful Saturday, as his No. 17 United States Air Force Honda – a joint effort with Dale Coyne Racing and Thom Burns Racing – lacked speed most of the week.

“Fast Friday” yielded some promise, as his quickest no-tow speed was 226.752 mph, good enough for 26th on the no-tow chart that day.

Saturday, however, proved a struggle. Unable to find the speed on his first two runs – he was bumped out of the field after his second attempt – he needed a third and final effort to make the field.

A four-lap average of 224.874 mph didn’t leave him much wiggle room, but it was just enough to get Daly into the field, as he took 32nd on the board. He’ll start 33rd after averaging 224.429 mph on Sunday.

Conor Daly survived a stressful qualifying weekend to make the Indy 500 field. Photo: IndyCar

“No dramas (on Sunday), but we’re fighting for miles an hour. All I can do is put my foot down and do the best we can for our incredible partners at the U.S. Air Force. It’s incredible to be here with them and at this point, I’m just thankful to be in the field. I’d like to be a lot quicker, but we’ll see what we can do in practice tomorrow to improve our race car,” Daly detailed after Day 2 of qualifying.

Kyle Kaiser and Juncos Racing faced a similar uphill battle, but theirs was down to experience. Juncos was entering its second “500” after debuting last year, and their debut wasn’t exactly a smooth one.

Spencer Pigot and Sebastian Saavedra only qualified 29th and 31st respectively, though Saavedra was able to finish on the lead lap in 15th. Pigot, meanwhile, fought major handling issues all race long and languished six laps off the lead at race’s end, finishing in 18th.

The 2018 outing didn’t appear much easier, as the team tackled it with rookie driver Kyle Kaiser, with last year’s Indy Lights Presented by Cooper Tires champ trying to make the “500” in his first attempt.

“Fast Friday” looked to be a bad omen, as they were 33rd on the no-tow speed charts at the end of the day.

But, Saturday qualifying saw a drastic turn in fortunes, and to the positive side. Kaiser qualified with a four-lap average of 225.934 moh, good enough for 21st at the day’s end, and putting them well clear of any bumping drama.

His Sunday run of 226.398 mph exceeded expectations even further, and he will start Sunday’s race in 17th.

Kyle Kaiser during Indy 500 qualifying. Photo: IndyCar

“What an amazing day. I am in shock right now that we are going to be starting 17th for the 102nd Running of the Indianapolis 500,” an elated Kaiser exclaimed after Sunday. “It was a stellar performance by the team. They gave me a super quick car for qualifying. The conditions were very challenging as the wind picked up and it got really hot, but we made it through and put in the best lap in these conditions. I am so proud of the entire Juncos Racing crew and I am thrilled to represent NFP in the race next weekend.”

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