JGR’s Brickyard penalties in line with similar ’08 penalty for Edwards, Roush

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As explained in the main story regarding Joe Gibbs Racing’s P5 penalty for post-race infractions following Sunday’s Brickyard 400, NASCAR inspectors found issues with rear block-off plates on Denny Hamlin’s No. 11 car after he finished third.

If airflow is allowed through the plates – which are meant to keep things like smoke and fire from entering the driver’s compartment – the car can receive an aerodynamic advantage.

JGR has suffered six-race suspensions for Hamlin’s crew chief (Darian Grubb, who also got fined $125,000) and car chief (Wesley Sherrill), plus a loss of 75 driver’s and owner’s championship points respectively for Hamlin and J.D. Gibbs.

Those punishments are relatively in line with similar ones that Roush Fenway Racing took in 2008 after Carl Edwards won at Las Vegas Motor Speedway.

Following Edwards’ win in the UAW-Dodge 400, the cover for the oil tank container was found missing on his car in post-race inspection. Like with the plates, a missing oil tank cover can help provide better aerodynamics.

This particular violation, which would appear to go with what’s covered in a P5 penalty in the current NASCAR rules, led to Edwards losing 100 driver points and the 10 bonus points from his Vegas win that would’ve been used to seed him in that year’s Chase for the Sprint Cup.

Additionally, team owner Jack Roush was docked 100 owner points and Edwards’ crew chief at the time, Bob Osborne, was fined $100,000 and suspended for six races.

In the immediate aftermath, then-Roush Fenway team president Geoff Smith said: “This is classic 16th century punishment where you get your fingers cut off for stealing a penny.” However, the team eventually chose not to appeal the Vegas penalties.

As for JGR, they have decided to appeal their penalties from Sunday’s race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. However, they’ve also confirmed that Grubb and Sherrill will immediately begin serving their suspensions starting with this weekend’s race at Pocono.

Michael Carter wins Mazda Road to 24 Shootout

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Michael Carter was selected as the winner of the 2018 Mazda Road to 24 Shootout.

Carter was one of four drivers who competed for the honor and a $100,000 scholarship that went along with it. Matthew Dirks, Hannah Grisham and Loni Unser also competed.

With the scholarship, Carter will compete in the 2019 Battery Tender Global Mazda MX-5 Cup.

“What a journey this has been,” said Carter in a press release. “The reason I started racing a Mazda was because of the Mazda Road to 24 Shootout. It was our one single goal all along and to finally accomplish that is surreal. The process begins next week of getting ready for next season, for the series test at Barber, and to put together a good season in the Global MX-5 Cup.”

Carter was invited to the Shootout largely because of his 2018 performance in SCCA. He finished second in the SCCA Hoosier Super Tour Points Championship, won the Spec Miata Challenge and won in Spec Miata at the American Road Race of Champions.

The 18-year-old Carter had his eye on the Road to Mazda early.

“Each year, it is exciting to see the next batch of talent that is in the pipeline,” said John Doonan, Director, Mazda Motorsports. “I heard something from Michael and his father that really hit a chord with me which was that they built a Spec Miata with the sole purpose of going up the Mazda Road to 24 ladder.

That really speaks to the challenger spirit at Mazda, to why we have the Shootout, and to the family that we have at Mazda. Michael is the driver today who walks away with the scholarship, but we had four families come together here who have all gone racing together. For all of us at Mazda, it’s very rewarding to give these families a chance to go racing together. We look forward to watching Michael take the next step in his career in next season’s Global MX-5 Cup.”