It’s been eight years since “Talladega Nights” was released, and NASCAR has changed a lot since

3 Comments

The Will Ferrell goofball comedy Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby premiered in theaters eight years ago today, and it’s been fascinating to see what’s happened to the world of NASCAR since August 4, 2006.

Here’s just a brief summation of the things and moments captured in Talladega Nights that are either still relevant today or have changed in that time frame:

  • NASCAR has been through two new generations of cars, as the Car of Tomorrow premiered in 2007, went through enhancements and then launched the new Generation-6 car in 2013.
  • NASCAR’s last season on NBC was in 2006… it will return in 2015. The booth crew changes, from Bill Weber, Wally Dallenbach Jr. and the late, great Benny Parsons to Rick Allen, Jeff Burton and Steve Letarte next year.
  • SPEED Channel is no more, as it chronicled Ricky Bobby’s return to the track at Rockingham (which no longer holds a Cup race) for a test after his accident at Charlotte that led to the whole “Help me Tom Cruise!” gag.
  • Nextel was still the series title sponsor; Cup did not become the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series until 2008.
  • Kurt Busch has followed a Ricky Bobby-like odyssey of his own, with a high-profile fall from grace from Team Penske at the end of 2011, to then actually driving a Ricky Bobby-inspired “ME” paint scheme with permission from all involved at Talladega the spring of 2012 with, fittingly, Phoenix Racing as the team. And that was to raise awareness for the Armed Forces Foundation. With Furniture Row Racing a year later, he drove a Wonder Bread-sponsored car. Now, Busch is back with a top team in Stewart-Haas Racing, and also been one of the stories of the 2014 racing season with his double attempt at Indianapolis and Charlotte Memorial Day weekend – the former event where he won the rookie-of-the-year honors after a sixth place finish.
  • Dale Earnhardt Jr. was in his eventual second-to-last season at Dale Earnhardt Inc. (2007) before his first at Hendrick Motorsports (2008). “Junior” switched from the 8 to 88 in ’08.
  • Jamie McMurray has gone from Chip Ganassi Racing to Roush Fenway Racing and then back to Ganassi.
  • Michael Waltrip called Talladega Nights great.
  • No “Jean Girard” type has entered NASCAR, but Colombian Juan Pablo Montoya entered NASCAR at the tail end of 2006 to provide the first consistent, full-time foreign driver from 2007 through 2013. JPM didn’t sip macchiatos; he did manage to hit a jet drier once, and that’s spawned an endless barrage of bad jokes since the 2012 Daytona 500. Of course now, JPM is back in IndyCar where he races against a guy who can pull off a wicked Jean Girard imitation – actual Frenchman Simon Pagenaud.
  • A litany of corporate sponsors – some of which were lampooned in the movie – have since left the sport.
  • One of the actors in the film got arrested for domestic violence… and that came only a month after he was arrested for reckless driving. Surprisingly, that actor wasn’t one of the two who played Ricky Bobby’s troublesome twosome of kids, Walker and Texas Ranger – it was the actor who played a young “RB” himself.
  • Talladega Nights-inspired restaurant was sued by Sony Pictures.

There’s undoubtedly more, but for now, we’ll simply leave you with those moments to chew on.

Formula 1: Ricciardo nurses power unit trouble to win in Monaco

Photo: Getty Images
Leave a comment

Red Bull Racing’s Daniel Ricciardo had dominated the Monaco Grand Prix weekend heading into Sunday, topping every practice session and laying down a lap-record 1:10.810 to secure the pole.

The race itself was also going according to plan for Ricciardo, as he got the jump off Ferrari’s Sebastian Vettel on the start to lead into Sainte Devote.

However, on Lap 28, after the leaders all made their lone pit stops of the race, Ricciardo’s day nearly came unglued when he reported a loss of power on his RB14.

With the Red Bull team monitoring the issue, Vettel was able to close back in on Ricciardo and began stalking him for the lead.

However, Ricciardo brilliantly utilized a combination of late-braking and sustained cornering speed to keep Vettel at bay and secure his first victory at the Monaco Grand Prix.

The victory, Ricciardo’s second of the 2018 Formula 1 season, serves as sweet redemption after a pit stop error cost him a possible victory in 2016, when he settled for second behind Mercedes’ Lewis Hamilton.

Vettel, meanwhile, saw his challenge hampered after a Lap 72 Virtual Safety Car for a crash between Sauber’s Charles Leclerc and Toro Rosso’s Brendon Hartley – Leclerc suffered brake failure on the run up to the Nouvelle Chicane, and collected Hartley in the process.

When the VSC ended, Vettel could not get his Pirellis back up to temperature, and Ricciardo pulled away in the final laps.

While Vettel ended up second, Hamilton rounded out the podium in third, despite struggling with a graining issue on his Pirelli ultrasofts in the second half of the race. Hamilton held off Ferrari’s Kimi Raikkonen, who also fended off Hamilton’s teammate Valtteri Bottas for fourth – the trio finished up third (Hamilton), fourth (Raikkonen), and fifth (Bottas).

Esteban Ocon was sixth for Force India, with Pierre Gasly coming home a strong seventh for Toro Rosso. Nico Hulkenberg ended up eighth for Renault, while Max Verstappen came home ninth after starting last – Verstappen ran long on his first stint before switching to hypersofts on Lap 48. He ran the hypers all the way to the end to finish ninth.

Carlos Sainz Jr. was the final points finisher, coming home tenth for Renault.

Results are below.

Follow@KyleMLavigne