Motocross: Jeremy Martin secures first career 250 Class championship on muddy Indiana track

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On any other day, a season-worst 15th-place moto finish for Jeremy Martin may have left the young rider feeling seriously disappointed.

Not Saturday though. Martin had plenty of reason to celebrate after officially clinching the 250 Class title in the 2014 Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship.

Thanks to some heavy rain on Saturday morning that came in time for the first practice session at the Thor Indiana National, the Ironman Raceway track was turned into a wet, sloppy, muddy mess. Although the rain held off once the racing got underway, the damage had already been done. Lap times were slow. Several riders found themselves stuck in the mud and struggled to get their bikes free. Riding behind someone else meant getting roosted in the face with mud, and as a result, some riders were forced to toss their goggles and pull into the mechanic’s area to get a new pair.

Despite the unpredictable conditions, Martin didn’t have much issue navigating the track in the first 250 Class moto. The Yamalube/Star Racing/Yamaha rider finished second behind Jessy Nelson, and thanks to poor outings from the two riders still mathematically alive in the title race – Blake Baggett and Cooper Webb – Martin was able to lock up the title with three motos still left in the season.

A 15th-place finish in Moto 2 left Martin off the overall podium for the day, but after the conclusion of the race, he was presented with the #1 plate in honor of his championship. The title is the first of Martin’s career, and he accomplished it in just his second full season of professional racing.

“To be able to have the number one plate, I’ve been thinking of how good it would feel to hear Kevin [Crowther] from the AMA to be passing on the number one plate to me and this is the greatest moment of my life,” Martin said after receiving the plate.

Martin also acknowledged the fans that have been supporting him throughout the season.

“It’s an amazing feeling,” he said, “I heard the fans cheering me on the whole time out there, and that was the motivation I needed. You guys [the fans] have been cheering me on all year, and you don’t know how much that means to me.”

The overall victory in Indiana went to Red Bull KTM’s Marvin Musquin, who placed third in Moto 1 and then won Moto 2. After starting the year off slow as he recovered from ACL surgery, Musquin is on fire lately, with victories at two of the last three rounds.

Joey Savatgy (4-3 moto finishes) had his best race ever and finished second overall. Jessy Nelson – whose Moto 1 victory was the first of his career – earned the final spot on the overall podium despite an eighth-place finish in the second moto.

Indiana 250 Class Overall Results
1. Marvin Musquin (3-1)
2. Joey Savatgy (4-3)
3. Jessy Nelson (1-8)
4. Christophe Pourcel (9-2)
5. Cooper Webb (6-5)
6. Dean Wilson (8-6)
7. Alex Martin (7-7)
8. Jeremy Martin (2-15)
9. Jason Anderson (5-10)
10. Blake Baggett (14-4)
*Moto 1 and Moto 2 results in parenthesis

Column: Contrasting Michael Schumacher’s and Robert Wickens’ situations

(Photo: Tony Gentile / Reuters)
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As much of the world looks forward to Christmas and New Years Day in the next few weeks, a dark anniversary is also on the near horizon.

It’s hard to believe that December 29 will mark five years since seven-time Formula One champion Michael Schumacher was critically injured in a skiing accident, suffering a traumatic brain injury.

Schumacher and his family were on holiday in the French Alps when he fell and struck his head on a boulder. The impact was so severe that it cracked the helmet he was wearing straight through.

One can only imagine the damage the impact did to Schumacher’s skull and brain.

While chronologically the accident occurred a half-decade ago, for many of “Schu’s” most ardent fans, it seems like it was just yesterday when the earth-shattering news broke.

In the following days and weeks after his accident, Schumacher was placed in a medically induced coma, as well as had at least two surgeries on his brain.

Since then the world has waited for news about the racing legend’s condition, only to receive very little in terms of updates over the subsequent five years.

That’s the way his family wants it, having repeatedly requested privacy when it comes to details about Michael’s condition. That request for privacy should be respected.

Schumacher’s wife, Corrina, issued a rare statement late last month that didn’t really say much about her husband’s condition or recovery, but she did thank fans and well-wishers for their continued prayers and concern about her husband, adding, “We all know Michael is a fighter and will not give up.”

In the meantime, Schumacher’s fans have been able to stay somewhat close to his legacy by watching as his 19-year-old son, Mick, has showed significant achievement in his own budding racing career.

So much so that rumors have already popped up that the younger Schu may soon follow in his father’s F1 footsteps, perhaps as early as 2020.

That, of course, remains to be seen.

What makes the Schumacher situation so difficult for many to still understand is how, while enjoying a simple skiing excursion with his family, he suffered a life-changing accident while having survived some wicked crashes during his racing career that barely affected him.

We still don’t know if Schumacher can walk, talk, is conscious and lucid or not – and many of his fans have already accepted that we may never, ever know any of those details. But if that’s the way he and/or his family want it, again, then we need to respect their wishes.

At the same time, there’s another race car driver who suffered a horrendous injury at Pocono Raceway this past August, namely IndyCar driver Robert Wickens.

Wickens suffered a devastating spinal cord injury that has left him a paraplegic – although there remains a great deal of hope that he will one day walk again.

While both suffered serious injuries, there’s a significant contrast between Schumacher and Wickens. The former (or his family) is keeping all details about his condition private, while the latter keeps his fans and supporters regularly updated on social media on how he’s doing.

That includes Wickens posting a number of videos, including some rather humorous ones where he has a mischievous look in his eyes or a good-natured smirk on his face — like bringing in a Christmas tree to his rehab facility, or “racing” teammate James Hinchcliffe in wheelchairs in a Days of Thunder homage of sorts.

Watching each new Wickens video or reading his most recent online messages, it’s very clear that expressing himself and reaching out to the world is indeed good therapy and medicine of sorts for the Canadian driver.

He needs those social media posts and videos as much as we need them from him.

And it also helps fans better understand where Wickens is at in his recovery and rehab.

If Schumacher or his family wish to still remain private about his condition, we must respect that. But perhaps they could see the good will and good tidings that Wickens’ videos and posts offer. They’re as good for Wickens’ own well-being as they are for his fans — and they could be equally as good for Schumacher, his family and his fans.

Follow @JerryBonkowski