Lotterer warns not to expect too much from his F1 debut

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Three-time Le Mans winner Andre Lotterer feels ready to make his Formula 1 debut this weekend with Caterham after securing an unusual deal to race in Belgium this weekend.

Caterham confirmed on Wednesday that Lotterer, pictured left, would be replacing full-time driver Kamui Kobayashi for the race at Spa-Francorchamps, allowing the team to draw on the German’s experience from his other racing escapades.

However, given that Lotterer has made his name in sportscars, and that he hasn’t tested an F1 car since 2002, there have been some questions about his suitability for the seat. He is unfazed by the prospect, though.

“For sure, it’s a big challenge,” he admitted to the media in Belgium. “I think you have to be quite brave to jump in like this in the middle of the season.

“The reasons I feel ready for it is that first of all I still race in single seaters, SuperFormula, which I believe is one of the fastest single seater series outside of Formula 1. In that sense, I’m not out of shape.

“And I’m racing really complex cars in the WEC with Audi. The last time I drove an F1 car was more than ten years ago. The sport changed and evolved, but on my side, for sure I gained a lot of experience as well.

“It’s something nice to do in my career and it’s a great opportunity. I thank Caterham a lot for this, and also Audi and Team Toms in Japan who have given me the freedom.”

Lotterer warned the F1 community not to expect too much from him, given that he has only tested the car on the team’s simulator and will get behind the wheel for the first time on Friday during practice.

“I will have to learn everything very fast so don’t expect too much from me,” he said. “Obviously, Formula 1 is largely dictated by the car, and we don’t have a winning car. We have an updated package and I hope I can bring all my experience and my speed, as fast as possible.

“It’s an unusual situation.”

Kobayashi is poised to return to the wheel of the Caterham for the Italian Grand Prix in two weeks’ time. However, this weekend’s race will give us an interesting insight into how difficult it will be to make the transfer from sportscar to single seater racing, as well as showing what Lotterer himself is capable of behind the wheel of an F1 car.

As my MotorSportsTalk colleague Tony DiZinno wrote earlier today, his debut will be refreshing for both Caterham and Formula 1 as a whole.

F1: Recapping the past week’s news

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Grosjean Three Penalty Points Away from a One-Race Ban

Haas F1’s Romain Grosjean could face a one-race ban if he accrues three more penalty points, per Formula1.com.

Grosjean, who had seven penalty points to his name entering last week’s Grand Prix of Singapore was assessed two more for ignoring blue flags in last week’s race.

Grosjean was in the midst of a battle with Sergey Sirotkin as race leaders Lewis Hamilton and Max Verstappen approached. FIA rules dictate that when a driver is given a blue flag, he or she must move over and let the faster car(s) through, irrespective of any in-race battle they may be involved in.

However, Grosjean continued to push Sirotkin as they battled for position, and did not immediately yield to Hamilton, which allowed Verstappen to close in.

Hamilton and Verstappen both eventually got by, though Hamilton was particularly alarmed by the incident.

“These guys were moving around … and they wouldn’t let me by,” he said in the aforementioned Formula1.com story. “It was definitely close and my heart was in my mouth for a minute.”

Grosjean did issue an apology afterward, and offered his side of the story.

“I’m sorry if I blocked anyone, it was not my intention,” Grosjean said. “I believe I did my best. I was fighting with Sergey, who was doing a little bit of go-kart racing out there. I couldn’t really slow down. Pierre [Gasly] was on my gearbox and Sergey was on my front wing. I passed him, then as soon as I passed him, I let Lewis by.”

Any driver who accumulates 12 penalty points in a span of 12 months is automatically handed a one-race ban. For Grosjean, his current tally began on October 29, 2017, meaning if he receives three more between now and October 29, 2018, he will be forced to sit out one race.

F1 Signs Sponsorship For In-Play Betting

Per BBC Sport, Liberty Media, which owns Formula 1, has signed a sponsorship rights agreement with Interregional Sports Group to develop and manage in-race betting platforms for grands prix.

The sponsorship, worth a reported $100 million U.S. dollars, would help generate “new ways to engage with the sport,” said managing director Sean Bratches in the BBC Sport story.

Liberty and F1 officials would also work with Sportradar, which collects and analyzes sports data, to track betting and ensure no fraudulent activities take place.

Arrivabene Takes Responsibility for Ferrari Missteps

Ferrari Team Principal Maurizio Arrivabene. (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)

Ferrari team principal Maurizio Arrivabene has said he accepts full responsibility for the miscues Ferrari has made during the 2018 Formula 1 season.

“The only mistake you see in front of you is me. I’m responsible for the team,” Arrivabene said in a piece posted on Crash.net.

He added, “When the result is not coming, it’s my responsibility. Not the responsibility of Sebastian (Vettel) or the engineer or the responsibility of the mechanics. It’s my responsibility.”

The statement, made on the Friday press conference prior to the Singapore Grand Prix, is especially poignant in the wake of a somewhat clumsy Italian Grand Prix. The team faced criticism after Kimi Raikkonen scored the pole, ahead of the championship-contending Vettel.

Vettel, too, has not been infallible. Most notably, he had contact with Valtteri Bottas on the opening lap of the French Grand Prix, spinning Bottas and damaging Vettel’s front wing – Vettel eventually finished fifth – and he crashed while leading the German Grand Prix. These incidents are among multiple black marks that have blighted Vettel’s championship challenge.

However, despite the errors, Vettel remains unshaken ahead of the final six races of 2018.

“We don’t have to fear any track that is coming, our car is working well in every track, so there’s nothing to fear until the end of the season. Russia should suit our car, it’s getting better for us every year,” Vettel said in a separate Crash.net piece.

He added, “There are still a lot of races to go and points to score. I never believed we have the faster car by a large margin like people said, but I know we have a very good car.”

Currently, Vettel trails Hamilton by 40 points in the driver’s championship, while Ferrari trails Mercedes by 37 points in the constructor’s championship.

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