Joey Logano holds off Penske teammate Brad Keselowski for Bristol win (VIDEO)

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For a while, it looked like a 13th different Sprint Cup driver would lock in a Chase berth with a victory tonight at Bristol Motor Speedway.

But instead, Joey Logano entered the 3-Win Club in the 2014 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series season.

Logano took the lead with 45 laps to go and saw off a last-lap challenge from Team Penske teammate Brad Keselowski to win the Irwin Tools Night Race – becoming the fifth different driver to win three races this year (Keselowski, Jeff Gordon, Jimmie Johnson, Dale Earnhardt Jr.).

Following a restart with 63 laps left, Logano quickly moved into the Top 5 and then dispatched Carl Edwards for second place before setting his sights on the winless Matt Kenseth.

After an extended period of working the inside line, Logano finally made it stick with 45 to go when he slid up in front of Kenseth to claim the lead.

But Logano still had to out-hustle former Cup champion Keselowski, who went in deep on the inside of Logano in Turns 3 and 4 on the last lap.

It was an admirable last-ditch effort, but Logano held firm and motored by on the high line to take his first career win at NASCAR’s most infamous half mile.

“I wasn’t sure when I woke up this morning if we had a winning car or not,” Logano said to ESPN in Victory Lane. “[Crew chief] Tod Gordon is a good salesman – he pretty much sold me into thinking I had a winning car and made some small adjustments with it all night, and we got our third win of the year.

“…This is like one of the three biggest races of the year – the Bristol night race. And to have this in the record books with your name on it, it’s just really, really cool.”

For Logano, the win seemed to come down to knowing when and when not to use patience. Off of the restart with 63 to go, Logano rocketed from the sixth position to second in the span of just a few laps.

But when he finally got near Kenseth, he didn’t push the issue immediately, instead waiting for a perfect opportunity to strike.

“On the restart when we were sixth, I said ‘I’ve got to capitalize right now,'” said Logano. “So I went as hard as I could, raced the 20 [Kenseth] really hard…I was trying to keep up with him for a while. The 20 was really fast.”

After Logano finally assumed the lead, it appeared the race was pretty much done. But with just a few laps left, he sensed something amiss with his No. 22 Shell-Pennzoil Ford.

“I don’t know if it was brakes or a hub failing in the rear, but it started vibrating really bad, getting really loose,” he said. “I’m like, ‘Ugh, hold on, a couple more laps, couple more laps!’

“Of course, there’s always added drama at the end that you don’t want…I was just able to make it there at the end.”

As for Kenseth, he eventually settled for third position ahead of fourth-place Jimmie Johnson and fifth-place Kurt Busch.

However, Kenseth continued to solidify his hold on a Chase Grid position, extending his cushion over 17th place to a sizable 83 points.

Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Bristol spring race winner Carl Edwards, Jamie McMurray, Paul Menard, and Greg Biffle rounded out the Top 10.

McMurray, who pretty much needs a win to make the post-season, led a race-high 148 laps. But after pitting for four fresh tires under a caution with less than 70 laps to go, he took the restart in fifth and couldn’t recover the lost track position.

NASCAR SPRINT CUP SERIES AT BRISTOL – Irwin Tools Night Race
Unofficial Results
1. 22-Joey Logano, led 76 laps
2. 2-Brad Keselowski, led 46 laps
3. 20-Matt Kenseth, led 62 laps
4. 48-Jimmie Johnson
5. 41-Kurt Busch
6. 17-Ricky Stenhouse Jr.
7. 99-Carl Edwards
8. 1-Jamie McMurray, led 148 laps
9. 27-Paul Menard
10. 16-Greg Biffle
11. 4-Kevin Harvick, led 75 laps
12. 42-Kyle Larson
13. 31-Ryan Newman
14. 47-AJ Allmendinger
ONE LAP DOWN
15. 14-Jeff Burton
16. 24-Jeff Gordon, led 17 laps
TWO LAPS DOWN
17. 15-Clint Bowyer
18. 95-Michael McDowell
THREE LAPS DOWN
19. 51-Justin Allgaier
20. 78-Martin Truex Jr.
21. 55-Brian Vickers
22. 40-Landon Cassill
FOUR LAPS DOWN
23. 34-David Ragan
24. 36-Reed Sorenson
FIVE LAPS DOWN
25. 38-David Gilliland
26. 13-Casey Mears
SEVEN LAPS DOWN
27. 10-Danica Patrick
28. 3-Austin Dillon
EIGHT LAPS DOWN
29. 98-Josh Wise
30. 26-Cole Whitt
NINE LAPS DOWN
31. 33-David Stremme

32. 23-Alex Bowman, Lap 489
33. 32-JJ Yeley, Lap 489
34. 9-Marcos Ambrose, Lap 480
35. 5-Kasey Kahne, Lap 477, led 40 laps
36. 18-Kyle Busch, Lap 442, Accident, led 8 laps
37. 83-Ryan Truex, Lap 338, Engine
38. 7-Michael Annett, Lap 243, Accident
39. 88-Dale Earnhardt Jr., Lap 176, Accident
40. 11-Denny Hamlin, led 28 laps, Lap 160 Accident
41. 43-Aric Almirola, Lap 123, Accident
42. 66-Brett Moffitt, Lap 78, Engine
43. 37-Dave Blaney, Lap 37, Overheating

New Chip Ganassi driver Marcus Armstrong will team with boyhood idol Scott Dixon

Marcus Armstrong Scott Dixon
Joe Portlock - Formula 1/Formula Motorsport Limited via Getty Images
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Marcus Armstrong was a Scott Dixon fan his entire life, and when he was 8, the aspiring young racer asked his fellow New Zealander to autograph a helmet visor that he hung on his bedroom wall.

Next year, Armstrong will be Dixon’s teammate.

Armstrong was named Friday as the fourth IndyCar driver in the Chip Ganassi Racing lineup and will pilot the No. 11 next season on road and street courses.

A driver for the five oval races on the 17-race schedule will be named later.

The No. 11 is essentially the No. 48 that seven-time NASCAR champion Jimmie Johnson drove the last two seasons, with Chip Ganassi making the change to run four cars numbered in sequential order. Indianapolis 500 winner Marcus Ericsson drives the No. 8, six-time champion Dixon drives the No. 9, and 2020 IndyCar champion Alex Palou drives the No. 10.

So just who is the second Kiwi in the Ganassi lineup?

A 22-year-old who spent the past three seasons in Formula One feeder series F2, a Ferrari development driver in 2021, and former roommate of Callum Illot and former teammate of Christian Lundgaard – both of whom just completed their rookie IndyCar seasons.

“I’ve always been attracted to the IndyCar championship because it’s one of those championships that’s been really well televised in New Zealand since I was young, mainly because of Scott and his success,” Armstrong told The Associated Press. “As time progressed, as I got closer to F1 and single-seaters, the attraction to IndyCar grew just because of how competitive the championship is – I like to challenge myself and the level of competition in IndyCar is remarkably high.”

Armstrong, from Christchurch, New Zealand, was set to travel from his current home in London to Indianapolis this weekend to meet his new team. He won’t need an introduction to Dixon, the 42-year-old considered the best IndyCar driver of his generation and Armstrong’s unequivocal childhood hero.

Last season, Dixon earned his 53rd career victory to pass Mario Andretti for second on the all-time list. Dixon has driven for Ganassi in all but 23 of his 345 career starts.

“For a long time I’ve been a Scott Dixon fan. I don’t want to make him cringe with our age difference,” Armstrong told the AP.

Despite the two-decade age difference, Armstrong never considered someday racing with Dixon a fantasy.

He convinced his father after winning five national karting championships to allow him to leave New Zealand for Italy at age 14, where he moved by himself to pursue a racing career. Armstrong said as soon as he’d received parental permission, he’d never look back.

Armstrong was in Formula 4 two years after his move to Italy and won that title in his first season. He won four races and four poles in F3 in the 2018 and 2019 seasons, then collected four wins and eight podiums in three seasons of F2.

“Maybe it’s a strength, or maybe it’s a weakness, but I always thought I was capable of doing great in the sport,” Armstrong told the AP. “I think you probably have to succeed in the sport, you need to believe in yourself. I always pictured myself being in IndyCar.

“As Scott’s teammate? I can’t specifically say I saw that. It’s an extraordinary chain of events.”

Armstrong becomes just the latest driver to leave Europe, where F1 is the pinnacle but has only 20 seats each year. Alexander Rossi began the trend in 2016 when the American left F1 and won the Indianapolis 500 as a rookie. He’s been followed by Ericsson, last season’s Indy 500 winner, Romain Grosjean, Illot, Lundgaard, and on Thursday three-time W Series champion and Williams F1 reserve driver Jamie Chadwick was announced as driver for Andretti Autosport in IndyCar’s second-tier development series.

Armstrong said he could have remained in F2 for a fourth season, but he’d been watching IndyCar for so long, and after conversations with Illot and Lundgaard, he decided to make the move to what he believes is the most balanced racing series in the world. He tested for Dale Coyne Racing at Sebring in October.

He doesn’t know if European racing is done for good, just that he wants to be in IndyCar right now.

“I don’t want to think too far into the future, I’m just grateful for this opportunity that is standing right in front of me,” Armstrong said. “I want to perform as well as I can in the near future and just consolidate myself in the fantastic chance that is IndyCar and just do my best.

“I’m not looking at F1 as a landing spot – I am looking at IndyCar, and that’s exactly why I am here.”