IndyCar: Ryan Hunter-Reay, Simon Pagenaud land on Sonoma podium

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Ryan Hunter-Reay and Simon Pagenaud were able to make late moves to finish second and third respectively in today’s GoPro Grand Prix of Sonoma.

But only Pagenaud will be able to go to next weekend’s Verizon IndyCar Series season finale at Auto Club Speedway with a chance at the 2014 series championship.

Pagenaud is down 81 points to Will Power ahead of Saturday night’s MAV TV 500, which will have double points on offer. As for Hunter-Reay, he was eliminated from title contention despite finishing runner-up to winner Scott Dixon.

“Second…is not what we needed but, you know, it’s a pretty good day,” said Hunter-Reay, who is 92 points behind Power and needed to be within 88 after this next-to-last race of the year.

“It’s nice for sure. When you have the championship on the line, though, we needed Will to have two really bad weekends. Well, he had one and we needed to win today.”

Following his third-place effort, Pagenaud said that he didn’t see such a result coming after qualifying 15th yesterday.

“Sonoma is such a hard track to pass on, so we made the race in the pits really,” he said. “The pit stops were awesome and that’s what made us jump so many positions. Strategy was very frustrating, very tough for me because I had to save so much fuel.

“But we made it past [Mike] Conway in the last corner and [to finish] third, it’s fantastic. This morning, I never thought we would be third. I’m delighted and we’re going into Fontana with a chance to the title so, as you know, that was something that was very important to me.”

Following their podium celebration, Hunter-Reay, Pagenaud and Dixon still had one bit of business to conduct.

Earlier in the week, INDYCAR CEO Mark Miles announced on the series’ Facebook page that he’d take the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge in Sonoma’s Victory Lane after being nominated by KV Racing Technology co-owner Jimmy Vasser.

The Sonoma podium finishers did the honors of drenching Miles, who sported a T-shirt promoting the series’ #IndyRivals campaign.

source: Getty Images
Credit: Getty Images.
source: Getty Images
Credit: Getty Images.

WATCH: Red Bull F1 team completes pit stop in zero gravity

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The Red Bull Racing pit crew may have already made headlines last weekend when it completed the fastest pit stop in Formula One history, changing Max Verstappen’s tires in 1.82 seconds, but the team’s most recent stunt took their skills to new heights – quite literally.

With the help of the Russian Space agency Roscomos, a group of the team’s mechanics completed the world’s first zero-gravity pit stop, on-board a IIyushin II-76K cosmonaut training plane.

Using a 2005 BR1, the team filmed the viral video over the course of a week, enduring seven flights and about 80 parabolas – periods in which the plane climbs 45 degrees before falling again at a ballistic arch of 45 degrees, creating a period of weightlessness for approximately 22 seconds.

With such a short time frame between weightlessness periods, the car and equipment had to be both quickly and safely secured before gravity once again took effect. Each filming lasted roughly 15 seconds, and the stunt was the most physically and technically demanding activity the live demo team had ever undertaken.

“It pushed us harder than I thought it would,” said Red Bull Support Team Mechanic Joe Robinson. “You realize how much you rely on gravity when you don’t have any!

“It challenges you to think and operate in a different way – and that was brilliant. It was a once in a lifetime opportunity and honestly, I could have stayed and done it all month. It was amazing. I think it’s the coolest, most fun thing the Live Demo team has ever done with a show car.”

Though Red Bull was the first team to perform a pit stop in zero gravity, surprisingly Red Bull was not the first team to put a car through zero gravity. In 1999, McLaren driver David Coulthard and his car experienced zero gravity as part of a promotion for then-sponsor West Cigarettes.

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