Insight: Planning Andretti’s Sports Marketing promotional efforts at Miami and NOLA

1 Comment

Yesterday saw the circuit unveil for the FIA Formula E Championship’s Miami ePrix, one of two events Andretti Sports Marketing is promoting that occur in the next six months.

As MotorSportsTalk chronicled throughout 2014 in the run-up to Milwaukee IndyFest, the buildup to an event is something that takes dedicated months of planning before being executed.

With a chance to look back on how Milwaukee was promoted this year and a look ahead to these next two races, we spoke with Andretti Sports Marketing president John Lopes about the challenges and excitement of promoting its two newest events: the Miami ePrix on March 14, and the Indy Grand Prix of Louisiana on April 12.

“Each event is a different challenge,” Lopes told MST in an interview at the Andretti Sports Marketing headquarters in Indianapolis. “Promotions are inherently local by their nature. In the case of NOLA, it’s local to Louisiana and the region east and south. In case of Miami, it’s southeast U.S. and global.

“We are really stoked about that race (in New Orleans),” he added. “From the moment we met Laney Chouest, we know Laney and the people who work there are totally wired in that community. So we don’t have a problem of credibility.”

That dovetailed into a conversation about the promotion of the Baltimore races, which Andretti’s group picked up late summer 2012 before promoting the Labor Day event on short notice.

A breakout on why Baltimore didn’t work could serve as a standalone piece (and will at a later date on MotorSportsTalk).

However, while Lopes said it was an incredible effort to get that race to even happen both in 2012 and 2013, the challenges in dealing with scheduling, logistics, different tax zones and a lack of real community support ultimately doomed the race.

source:
GP of NOLA logo.

Instant Andretti name credibility in New Orleans, Lopes said, should pay immediate dividends.

“So you go to New Orleans, and you see a track owner fully committed to the state, to philanthropy; and he pours $70 million into a track people said couldn’t be built,” Lopes explained. “So we come in and hear, ‘Oh, you’re affiliated with NOLA? Oh, you know Laney Chouest? Oh you’re from Andretti? We’re stoked!!’”

Lopes said NOLA is a very important market, considering where it sits geographically.

“If you think about it, that track sits in a state with no professional auto racing,” he said. “Then the closest thing to the east is Barber or Talladega. The closest to the west is COTA or Texas Motor Speedway. So that’s a huge chunk of space of underserviced motorsports fans, and more importantly, festival fans.”

A staff that includes Tim Ramsberger, David Goldwater and Lopes leading the marketing and corporate side of affairs has already made key strides in an area where an event needs to succeed: corporate suite sales.

“Corporate sales have been great,” Lopes said. “We haven’t started ticket sales yet, but suite sales are off the hook.”

source:
Photo: FIA Formula E

As for Miami, which occurs a month earlier and is one of the final rounds in the inaugural FIA Formula E season, Lopes said there aren’t the traditional market challenges for this race because it’s not being marketed as a traditional race.

“This isn’t so much about an auto race as a festival of all things green and eco-friendly,” Lopes explained. “The goal is to promote the green lifestyle, the e-village aspect of what we’re doing. We’re in-and-out one day.

“We’re not trying to compete, and we’re not even trying to appear to compete with any other motorsports initiatives in Florida. It’s about electric cars and electric green life.”

There’s also the added bonus for Andretti Sports Marketing of it being its first FIA-sanctioned event it is promoting.

“For us it’s very cool because we are now able to promote an FIA World Championship event,” he said. “Miami is a tougher market (than NOLA). It’s urban, so it has all those particular trappings, interrupting streets, railroad tracks, and construction. But Formula E is very supportive, and Beijing has shown it can and will happen.”

Female racer makes history with record finishes in dirt national midget events

Photo courtesy Toyota Racing
Leave a comment

Holly Shelton is riding high after setting a milestone for a female driver in a national midget series feature event on dirt this past weekend.

The Sacramento, California-area resident recorded the highest finish ever for a female dirt national midget series driver with a runner-up finish last Friday at the POWRi Lucas Oil National Midget League double-header weekend at Valley Speedway in Grain Valley, Missouri.

Shelton broke her own national record for top finish by a woman in a national dirt event – she finished third in a USAC race at Lawrenceburg, Indiana, last year.

One night after setting her new national record, Shelton and her Keith Kunz Motorsports Toyota roared back Saturday to finish third (started on the outside pole) in the second half of the weekend double-header, making her the first female dirt driver ever on the national midget circuit to earn back-to-back podium finishes.

“It’s cool making history as a female, but my number one thing is I just want to win,” said Shelton, who will be graduating from Cal-State Sacramento with a B.A. in Criminal Justice this fall. “Truthfully, on the track I don’t even remember that I’m a girl. I’m just racing all the guys with the same goal they have – to win.”

Only one other woman has finished second in either a USAC or POWRi midget feature – Sarah McCune at Winchester (Ind.) Speedway in 1999 – but that was on pavement, not dirt.

The record-setting weekend was great consolation for Shelton, who missed three races earlier this season due to surgery and then sat out three other races last month after suffering a race-related concussion.

“It felt good,” she said of her back-to-back podium finishes. “It builds up my confidence. The car is fast and we keep getting better and we want to build on it.”

Shelton was one of four women that competed in midget competition this weekend. The others were 19-year-old Maria Cofer and 16-year-olds Holley Hollan and Presley Truedson.

“It’s awesome seeing all the little girls come up to me excited to see me at the track,” Shelton said. “Hopefully, it encourages them to pursue their dreams as well and, as the years go on, more girls will get into it.”

Follow @JerryBonkowski