View from the ground: Austin fans’ take on new engines, fewer teams, and no Rossi

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AUSTIN – With a day’s worth of practice in the books, it was interesting to gauge some reactions of fans on the ground here in Austin regarding the change in the engine formula and the reduction of the two teams that have gone into administration.

Much has changed in a year’s time since the 2013 United States Grand Prix. The reaction was about as you’d expect, a mix of excitement, intrigue and disappointment.

Start first with a San Antonio native named Michael making his first trip to a Grand Prix, but a veteran fan of the sports car weekends here featuring the FIA World Endurance Championship and IMSA series the last two years.

“I immediately noticed they’re immensely less loud than the WEC hybrids, Audi and Porsche,” he told me on the outside of the esses, at Turn 3. “The change doesn’t bother me because I had nothing to compare it to. The big thing to witness here is the change of direction.”

While positive – and bullish – about seeing the speed of an F1 car on site, he did express regret over the demise of Caterham and Marussia, which seemed a frequent sentiment. He added he was “crushed” that Alexander Rossi was unable to make his Grand Prix race debut, denied for the third time this season.

While Michael’s a new fan, local fan Greg has been to Grands Prix as far back as 1970 at Silverstone, and additionally to Montreal.

He said it was a bit strange to have earplugs with him and not be able to use them. But the bright side of the engine change, he said, was that it showcases the cutting edge technology that remains F1’s hallmark.

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Photo: Tony DiZinno

This being Halloween, there were due to be a few costumes on the grounds, and so while waiting in line for a bit of local Austin food flavor I happened upon two 20-something-year-old fans named Daniel and Kyle dressed as Mario and Luigi. Given the team reduction this weekend, it was perhaps a surprise these two weren’t added to the grid given the open slots…

Alas, they spoke highly of the engine change, noting how much they enjoyed hearing the turbo spool and the different engine notes. But like others, they were gutted to hear Rossi wouldn’t be on the grid.

Lastly as I headed near Turn 9 and on the run down to Turns 10 and 11 – after starting my jaunt coming across the bridge at Turn 3 – I saw a flag in full living color that read “Kimi is the Iceman.”

Turns out the sign was handmade by another 20-something named Jesse, who had only just moved to Austin in the last several weeks and was bringing the sign out of a seven-year hiatus.

He was nicely able to compare and contrast Austin to his only previous U.S. Grand Prix – the finale at Indianapolis in 2007 – and spoke highly of how much more involved Austin is as a city.

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Photo: Tony DiZinno

“I made up a Kimi is the Iceman flag at Indy 07 – just a massive fan,” he said. “It’s my first GP since. In Indy it didn’t feel as though there was a proper USGP vibe, here, everyone is aware of it.”

He and I also chatted about the demise of the smaller teams, noting how drivers like his favorite – Raikkonen – and Fernando Alonso may not have moved into their current slots at Ferrari without talent spotters like a Peter Sauber or Giancarlo Minardi discovering them at age 21 and 19, respectively.

“The U.S. is realizing the magnitude of losing two teams, and if it would have been three it would have been a crisis,” he said. “This has to be a wakeup call.”

There was also this five-pack of folks – a mix of Englishmen and Americans – who I saw but weren’t able to talk to too much.

What was refreshing about all of this, though, was that although the crowd appeared a bit smaller from last year (more on that to come in a separate trackside perspective piece later this afternoon), the passion, fervor and enthusiasm for F1 endures.

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Photo: Tony DiZinno

Sometimes, you get a bit blasé when you’re primarily bouncing between the paddock and the media center at an event. You occasionally forget the people who really make this thing work, and that’s the fans – and for them, long may this race continue.

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Eli Tomac, Ken Roczen’s two-man battle in Motocross provides surprises

Rich Shepherd, ProMotocross
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The 2019 Motocross season is one-third in the books and the title battle may have already come down to a two-man contest, while the pair of contenders might just be a little surprising in their own way.

Strictly by the numbers, no one can count Eli Tomac’s early season charge of first- and second-place finishes shocking, but threepeating in Motocross is such an incredibly difficult feat that no one would have been surprised to see him struggle out of the gates either. And in fact, that is precisely what happened.

Tomac came out of the gates slow in Round 1 and was seventh by the end of Lap 1 of Moto 1 – hardly the auspicious start he hoped for. He rebounded only as far as fourth and that ultimately cost him a chance to win the overall. Tomac won Moto 2 to claim second overall.

In Round 2, Tomac found his rhythm and won both Motos and grabbed the red plate. For the moment, he had the momentum with three consecutive Moto wins.

Tomac stumbled again in Round 3 – this time finishing only fifth in Moto 1 and earning only 16 points to dig a deep hole that eventually surrendered the red plate to Ken Roczen.

It was at Thunder Valley in Round 3 that a pattern emerged. Tomac would not make it easy on himself early in the day, but was more than capable of winning the second Motos to overcome his deficit.

That Roczen has won this season is also not a surprise in itself. Many believed his ascent to the top step of the podium was way overdue.

That he has run so well, however, was not entirely expected at the start of the season. Since injuring both arms in a pair of accidents, Roczen came tantalizingly close to snapping his winless streak a dozen times. He won heat races during the Supercross season and finished second at Anaheim I, Minneapolis, Dallas, and Seattle earlier this year.

He just couldn’t secure the overall win.

Roczen’s Moto 1 victory at Hangtown might have been the precursor to another disappointing weekend, but once Tomac got into the lead, Roczen zeroed in on the Kawasaki’s back tire and finished second in route to the overall victory.

Roczen lost the overall and the red plate to Tomac in Round 2 at Pala, but he stood on the podium in both Motos. Roczen podiumed twice again in Round 3 while taking that overall victory to regain the red plate in what has become a seesaw affair in the early part of the 2019 season.

Last week, Roczen looked more like Tomac with his desperate struggle in Moto 1 and sixth-place finish. That was the first (and so far only) time this season that he failed to stand on the podium.

Roczen’s Moto 2 win last week was just enough to put him second overall with barely enough points to force a tie at the top of the leaderboard with 176 points apiece.

Meanwhile, Tomac failed to win either Moto with a third in the first race and runner-up finish in the second.

The moral victory and advantage may shift to Roczen this week.

As they have swapped the victory in the first four rounds with Roczen winning the odd-numbered events, he sees this weekend’s Round 5 as an opportunity.

“I’m looking forward to next weekend’s race,” Roczen said in a team press release. “The track is sandy. It’s very similar—actually almost identical—to what I ride on a regular basis at home.”

Tomac and Roczen enter Round 5 with a 32-point advantage over two riders tied for third in the standings.

So far Zach Osborne and Jason Anderson have not been in the same league as the leaders, but it only takes one slip of the wheel to fall out of the points in in a race and allow these racers to close the gap.

Season passes can be purchased at NBC Sports Gold.

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