View from the ground: Austin fans’ take on new engines, fewer teams, and no Rossi

0 Comments

AUSTIN – With a day’s worth of practice in the books, it was interesting to gauge some reactions of fans on the ground here in Austin regarding the change in the engine formula and the reduction of the two teams that have gone into administration.

Much has changed in a year’s time since the 2013 United States Grand Prix. The reaction was about as you’d expect, a mix of excitement, intrigue and disappointment.

Start first with a San Antonio native named Michael making his first trip to a Grand Prix, but a veteran fan of the sports car weekends here featuring the FIA World Endurance Championship and IMSA series the last two years.

“I immediately noticed they’re immensely less loud than the WEC hybrids, Audi and Porsche,” he told me on the outside of the esses, at Turn 3. “The change doesn’t bother me because I had nothing to compare it to. The big thing to witness here is the change of direction.”

While positive – and bullish – about seeing the speed of an F1 car on site, he did express regret over the demise of Caterham and Marussia, which seemed a frequent sentiment. He added he was “crushed” that Alexander Rossi was unable to make his Grand Prix race debut, denied for the third time this season.

While Michael’s a new fan, local fan Greg has been to Grands Prix as far back as 1970 at Silverstone, and additionally to Montreal.

He said it was a bit strange to have earplugs with him and not be able to use them. But the bright side of the engine change, he said, was that it showcases the cutting edge technology that remains F1’s hallmark.

source:
Photo: Tony DiZinno

This being Halloween, there were due to be a few costumes on the grounds, and so while waiting in line for a bit of local Austin food flavor I happened upon two 20-something-year-old fans named Daniel and Kyle dressed as Mario and Luigi. Given the team reduction this weekend, it was perhaps a surprise these two weren’t added to the grid given the open slots…

Alas, they spoke highly of the engine change, noting how much they enjoyed hearing the turbo spool and the different engine notes. But like others, they were gutted to hear Rossi wouldn’t be on the grid.

Lastly as I headed near Turn 9 and on the run down to Turns 10 and 11 – after starting my jaunt coming across the bridge at Turn 3 – I saw a flag in full living color that read “Kimi is the Iceman.”

Turns out the sign was handmade by another 20-something named Jesse, who had only just moved to Austin in the last several weeks and was bringing the sign out of a seven-year hiatus.

He was nicely able to compare and contrast Austin to his only previous U.S. Grand Prix – the finale at Indianapolis in 2007 – and spoke highly of how much more involved Austin is as a city.

source:
Photo: Tony DiZinno

“I made up a Kimi is the Iceman flag at Indy 07 – just a massive fan,” he said. “It’s my first GP since. In Indy it didn’t feel as though there was a proper USGP vibe, here, everyone is aware of it.”

He and I also chatted about the demise of the smaller teams, noting how drivers like his favorite – Raikkonen – and Fernando Alonso may not have moved into their current slots at Ferrari without talent spotters like a Peter Sauber or Giancarlo Minardi discovering them at age 21 and 19, respectively.

“The U.S. is realizing the magnitude of losing two teams, and if it would have been three it would have been a crisis,” he said. “This has to be a wakeup call.”

There was also this five-pack of folks – a mix of Englishmen and Americans – who I saw but weren’t able to talk to too much.

What was refreshing about all of this, though, was that although the crowd appeared a bit smaller from last year (more on that to come in a separate trackside perspective piece later this afternoon), the passion, fervor and enthusiasm for F1 endures.

source:
Photo: Tony DiZinno

Sometimes, you get a bit blasé when you’re primarily bouncing between the paddock and the media center at an event. You occasionally forget the people who really make this thing work, and that’s the fans – and for them, long may this race continue.

NBC/NBCSN SCHEDULE FROM UNITED STATES GRAND PRIX

Final 2023 Rolex 24 at Daytona results, stats

0 Comments

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — The 2023 Rolex 24 at Daytona overall results were all streaks: two consecutive victories in the endurance classic for Meyer Shank Racing and three in a row for Acura.

And Helio Castroneves became the second driver to win three consecutive Rolex 24s and the first to win in three straight years (Peter Gregg won in 1973, ’75 and ’76; the race wasn’t held in ’74 because of a global oil crisis).

Starting from the pole position, Tom Blomqvist took the checkered flag in the No. 60 ARX-06 that led a race-high 365 of 783 laps with co-drivers Castroneves, Simon Pagenaud and Colin Braun.

RESULTS: Click here for the finishing order in the 61st Rolex 24 at Daytona l By class

Meyer Shank Racing now has two Rolex 24 victories and the 2022 championship since entering the premier prototype category of the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship in 2021.

“I think what’s so special about this team is we are a small team compared to some of our opponents, but the atmosphere, the way we work, enables people to get the best out of themselves, and I think that’s why we’re such high achievers,” Blomqvist said. “I think there’s no egos. It’s a very open book, and that just enables each and every one of us to reach our potential. I think that’s why we’ve achieved so much success in really a short time at this level of competition.”

It’s the 16th IMSA victory for MSR.

The 61st running of the Rolex 24 at Daytona marked the debut of the Grand Touring Prototype category that brought hybrid engine technology to IMSA’s top level.

In other categories:

LMP2: James Allen passed Ben Hanley on the final lap and delivered a victory in the No. 55 ORECA by 0.016 seconds. It’s the second IMSA victory for Proton Competition, which last won at Sebring in 2012. It was the first Rolex 24 victory for Allen and co-drivers Gianmaria Bruni, Fred Poordad and Francesco Pizzi.

GTD Pro: Cooper MacNeil won in the last start of his IMSA career as the No. 79 Mercedes-AMG GT3 scored the first Rolex 24 at Daytona for WeatherTech Racing and the team’s fourth career victory.

MacNeil, who co-drove with Maro Engel, Jules Gounon and Daniel Juncadella, earned his 12th career victory and first at the Rolex 24.

“Winning by last IMSA race is tremendous,” MacNeil said.

GTD: The No. 27 Heart of Racing Team delivered the first Rolex 24 at Daytona for Aston Martin, which has been competing in endurance races at Daytona International Speedway since 1964. Drivers Marco Sorensen, Roman De Angelis, Darren Turner and Ian James (also the team principal) earned the victory in the English brand’s 13th attempt.

It’s also the first Rolex 24 at Daytona win for Heart of Racing, which has seven IMSA wins.

LMP3: Anthony Mantella, Wayne Boyd, Nico Varrone and Thomas Merrill drove the No. 17 AWA Duqueine D08 to victory by 12 laps for the team’s first class win in IMSA.


STATS PACKAGE FOR ROLEX 24 HOURS OF DAYTONA:

Fastest laps by driver

Fastest laps by driver after race (over the weekend)

Fastest laps by driver and class after race

Fastest lap sequence

Lap chart

Leader sequence

Race analysis by lap

Stint analysis

Time cards

Pit stop time cards

Best sector times

Race distance and speed average

Flag analysis

Weather report

NEXT: The 2023 IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship season will resume with the Mobil 1 Twelve Hours of Sebring March 18 with coverage across NBC, USA and Peacock.