Saying goodbye to a good mate: Marcos Ambrose to run final Sprint Cup race Sunday at Homestead

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G’day, mate, for a final time.

Sunday’s season-ending Ford EcoBoost 400 at Homestead-Miami Speedway will mark the final start in the No. 9 Richard Petty Motorsports Ford for Marcos Ambrose.

The Australian native will be heading back to his homeland to return to race in the V8 SuperCar Series, where he won two championships before beginning the NASCAR phase of his racing career.

Ambrose will be racing for a team partly owned by legendary IndyCar and NASCAR team owner Roger Penske.

“It’s been about nine years since my family and I came over the ‘water’ to try out this experiment of NASCAR,” Ambrose said in a RPM media release Wednesday. “It’s been great. We’ve won races, had good runs and met a lot of wonderful people.

“But, it’s time to take my family back across the ‘pond’ and go home. I made that decision this year, and once we did that, we started working towards that plan. That’s what this year has been like, and everyone has been very supportive.

“It’s a grind, and you need to be focused all the time on the task at hand. It will be nice to get some more weekends off and get back to V8.”

But before he heads back to his homeland, Ambrose would love to leave NASCAR with a flourish in Sunday’s race – and maybe spoil the day for some of the four remaining championship contenders.

“We are finishing our NASCAR season, and we just want to spoil the guys in the Chase,” Ambrose said. “I have had a good time here in NASCAR. It’s the most competitive form of racing in the world, and there is nothing like it.”

Ambrose will make his 227th career start Sunday. He has two wins, 18 top-five and 46 top-10 finishes, along with three poles. His career average start is 20.0 and average finish is 19.7.

His best season finishes have been 18th in both 2009 and 2012.

He also made 77 Nationwide Series starts with five wins, nine top-five and 18 top-10 finishes. Also, Ambrose started 22 Truck races in 2006, with a pair of top-five and four top-10 finishes.

In addition to racing for RPM, Ambrose also drove for the famed Wood Brothers, Michael Waltrip Racing, as well as JTG Daugherty Racing.

Ambrose joined RPM in 2011 and scored both of his Sprint Cup wins with the team, along with 11 top-five and 33 top-10 finishes.

Perhaps his biggest legacy that he’ll leave NASCAR with is his success as one of the best road course racers in NASCAR history.

“I have good runs, memorable races that I’ll carry with me for sure,” Ambrose said. “It was great winning for ‘The King’ (Richard Petty) and racing for wins at Watkins Glen.

“These are memories that I’ll have for a lifetime. I would have liked to win on an oval, sure, but I feel like I’ve accomplished a lot too. Now, it’s just time to go back home with my family.”

Ambrose has kept the door open about possibly returning to NASCAR for occasional one-off races, particularly on the road course circuits at Sonoma and Watkins Glen, as long as they don’t interfere with his V8 SuperCar activities.

“I will miss NASCAR, and I will watch it too,” he said. “I will watch the night races in the morning in Australia with breakfast, and that will be fun. I’m looking forward to that.”

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On a personal note, we’ll miss you, Marcos. You were always a professional and true gentleman, both on the racetrack and in dealings with the media.

Hopefully, we’ll see you back on this side of the pond from time to time. Good luck in your new venture. We look forward to reading about your championship-winning season in 2015!

Follow me @JerryBonkowski

Steve McQueen’s famous Porsche 917K displayed in new museum

Photo courtesy of the Brumos Collection
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One of the most famous race cars in film history will be featured in a new automotive museum in Florida.

The legendary Porsche 917K driven by Steve McQueen in the 1971 film ‘Le Mans’, which was last seen in 2017 when it sold for $14 million in an auction, will be one of the prominent pieces in the Brumos Collection, a new automotive museum in Jacksonville.

Widely considered the most famous Porsche 917 ever built, the historic race car initially was used for Le Mans testing before being featured in the McQueen film. The car was housed in a barn for more than two decades before re-emerging fully restored in 2001.

The car was unveiled as the newest member of the Brumos Collection during a special event signifying the museum’s grand opening on Monday.

With more than three dozen vehicles, the Brumos Collection provides museum guests an up-front look at racing and automotive history.

Notable race cars in the collection include:

  • 1968 Porsche 908: In the second track appearance ever for Porsche’s then-new 908, drivers Jo Siffert and Vic Elford tackled the notorious Nürburgring’s 1000 km in this yet-unproven model. Starting in the 27th position, Siffert guided the 908 to second at the end of the first lap and into the overall lead after the second lap, setting a lap record. This historic 908 persevered through a grueling 44 laps around Nürburgring’s 14-mile course, skillfully navigating a 1000-foot elevation change and 160 turns through the forest.
  • 1979 Porsche 935: This #59 Brumos Porsche 935 is shown exactly as it raced when it won the 1979 IMSA Championship with Peter Gregg behind the wheel. It is authentic in every detail, down to his distinctive tartan seat upholstery. Arguably the finest season of his career, Gregg won eight races and eight consecutive pole positions in 1979. The car won 53 percent of the races it entered, carrying Gregg to 20 percent of his total career IMSA victories.
  • 1972 Porsche 917-10: The first 917/10 was produced in 1971. This Can-Am Racer had a twin-turbocharged engine capable of 200+mph speeds at 1100 hp. Peter Gregg raced the car to a 9th place finish in the 1972 Can-Am Championship, followed by Hurley Haywood’s 3rd place finish in the 1973 Can-Am Series season. The Brumos Porsche 917-10 was the first race car to carry what has now become the iconic and recognizable white, red and blue livery with the famous Brumos Racing “sweeps.”
  • 1923 Miller 122 Grand Prix: Miller was the first American race car bought solely to race in Europe. This 1923 Miller 122 Grand Prix was driven by Bugatti racer Count Louis Zborowski, who raced it in England, Spain and France. Returned to the United State 89 years later, this is considered one of the most complete surviving Millers.

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