IndyCar and NASCAR presence basically set for Rolex 24

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One of the best parts about the Rolex 24 at Daytona is the volume of Verizon IndyCar Series and NASCAR Sprint Cup Series stars that will be in the race, considering their seasons don’t start for at least another month or two.

There’s inevitably a bumper crop of drivers from both that pop up. Thus far, that includes at least 13 of the 33 starters in the 2014 Indianapolis 500 (more than one-third of the field), and three from NASCAR Sprint Cup.

Here’s a rundown of confirmed and possible drivers from IndyCar and NASCAR set for the Rolex 24:

INDYCAR

  • Sebastien Bourdais, No. 5 Action Express Racing Corvette DP (P)
  • Ryan Hunter-Reay, No. 7 Starworks Motorsport Riley-Dinan BMW (P)
  • Charlie Kimball, No. 01 Chip Ganassi Racing Riley-Ford (P)
  • Sage Karam, No. 01 Chip Ganassi Racing Riley-Ford (P)
  • Tony Kanaan, No. 02 Chip Ganassi Racing Riley-Ford (P)
  • Scott Dixon, No. 02 Chip Ganassi Racing Riley-Ford (P)
  • Jack Hawksworth, No. 11 RSR Racing Oreca FLM09 (PC)
  • Martin Plowman, No. 61 BAR1 Motorsports Oreca FLM09 (PC)
  • Ryan Briscoe, No. 3 Corvette Racing Corvette C7.R (GTLM)
  • Simon Pagenaud, No. 4 Corvette Racing Corvette C7.R (GTLM)
  • Graham Rahal, No. 24 BMW Team RLL BMW Z4 GTE (GTLM)
  • Townsend Bell, No. 63 Scuderia Corsa Ferrari 458 Italia GT3 (GTD)
  • James Davison, No. 007 TRG-AMR Aston Martin Vantage (GTD)

Bourdais, Hunter-Reay, Kimball, Kanaan, Dixon, Hawksworth, Briscoe, Pagenaud and Rahal all raced the full 2014 season, with Karam, Bell, Davison and Plowman each racing in the Indianapolis 500. Bell also serves as NBCSN’s IndyCar analyst.

NASCAR

  • AJ Allmendinger, No. 60 Michael Shank Racing Ligier JS P2 Honda (P)
  • Jamie McMurray, No. 02 Chip Ganassi Racing Riley-Ford (P)
  • Kyle Larson, No. 02 Chip Ganassi Racing Riley-Ford (P)

The NASCAR contingent is much smaller but it’s three full-timers in Allmendinger, McMurray and Larson, plus Max Papis, who of course races sporadically in Cup, XFINITY and Camping World Trucks, in the No. 31 Whelen/Action Express Racing Corvette DP. Papis did not run a single NASCAR race in 2014.

More to come?

Chances are strong at least two more IndyCar-affiliated drivers will be joining the IndyCar list later this month.

Beyond the ones already listed, James Hinchcliffe is a likely candidate somewhere. Hinchcliffe told this writer last month he was close on a couple things, but wouldn’t be returning to the SpeedSource Mazda team he’s driven for the last three years.

Justin Wilson does not have a confirmed IndyCar ride for 2015, but would be a good get for any team for the Rolex 24. Wilson is out at Michael Shank Racing, replaced by teenaged rookie Matt McMurry.

The 2014 Indy Lights champion, Gabby Chaves, figures to return with the DeltaWing team. Chaves is seeking a full-time ride in IndyCar next season.

It’s doubtful any further NASCAR-affiliated drivers will join beyond the four mentioned above.

Most P and GTLM class rides are confirmed, which leaves only the pro-am PC and GTD classes as outlets for drivers to go.

Either way, the already confirmed drivers will have a chance to shake the rust off and get going starting with this weekend’s Roar and the Rolex 24 later this month, January 24-25.

Even with half the purse and no fans, Indy 500 still has major team value

Indy 500 purse fans
Joe Skibinski / IndyCar
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Even with reportedly half the purse and no fans in attendance, NTT IndyCar Series driver-owner Ed Carpenter believes it remains “absolutely critical” to hold the 104th Indy 500.

“Far and away it’s what makes and breaks our season as teams,” the Ed Carpenter Racing namesake told reporters during a Zoom media availability last week. “It’s the most important event to our partners. It 100 percent sucks not having fans there and not even being able to have the experience with our partners in full being there. But it’s necessary.

“We’ve got to look at all the hard decisions now of what we have to do to be in a position to have fans in 2021. It’s critical for the health of the teams that we have this race to make sure we have teams back here next year. That sounds a little dramatic, but that’s the reality.

HOW TO WATCH THE INDY 500 ON NBCDetails for the Aug. 23 race

DAILY INDY 500 SCHEDULEClick here for all on-track activity in August at Indy

“We live in not only a very volatile world right now, but our industry and motorsport in general, it’s not an easy business to operate. When you lose your marquee event, it’s a lot different than looking at losing Portland on the schedule or Barber. They’re in totally different atmospheres as far as the importance to us and our partners.”

Robin Miller reported on RACER.com that IndyCar and Indianapolis Motor Speedway owner Roger Penske told team owners last week the purse for the postponed Indianapolis 500 was slashed from $15 to $7.5 million. Miller reported holding the Aug. 23 race (1 p.m. ET, NBC) would be a $20 million hit to the bottom line.

Carpenter still is supportive of Penske’s “outstanding job” of leading the series through the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Even with a 50 percent purse reduction, the Indy 500 remains the linchpin of teams’ economic viability.

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The schedule has taken many hits with the cancellation of races at Barber Motorsports Park, Circuit of the Americas, Detroit, Portland International Raceway, Laguna Seca and Toronto, and another race weekend doubleheader at Mid-Ohio has been indefinitely postponed.

That leaves the 2020 slate at 12 confirmed races of an original 17, which has raised questions about how many races teams need to fulfill sponsor obligations.

“It’s a moving target,” said Carpenter, who announced the U.S. Space Force as a new sponsor for the Indy 500. “I think we’ve been pretty blessed as a team with the level of commitment of our partners and their understanding of COVID-19 and the impact on our schedule, our contracts.

“All of it is out of our control, out of the series’ control, the promoter’s control. At the end of the day is there a firm number (of races) I can give? No. But definitely every one that we lose, it does make it harder to continue having those conversations.

I think everyone’s as confident as you can be right now with what we have in front of us with what’s remaining on the schedule. Things are so fluid, it changes day-to-day, let alone week-to-week. We just have to take it as it comes. Right now the focus is on the 500 and maximizing this month to the best we possibly can given the situation.”

That’ll be hard this month for Carpenter, who grew up in Indianapolis and is the stepson of Tony George, whose family owned Indianapolis Motor Speedway for decades.

Having spent a lifetime around the Brickyard, Carpenter will feel the ache of missing fans as he races in his 17th Indy 500.

Ed Carpenter, shown racing his No. 20 Dallara-Chevrolet at Iowa Speedway last month, led a race-high 65 laps and finished second in the 2018 Indy 500 (Chris Jones/IndyCar).

“Over that time you develop relationships that are centered around standing outside of your garage in Gasoline Alley,” he said. “It stinks, it sucks that we don’t get to share that passion we all have that is the Indianapolis 500. Unfortunately it’s the reality we’re in right now.

I think this is the best that we can do unfortunately. Without a doubt it’s going to be a different environment. You’re going to be missing the sounds and a lot of the sights and colors. For sure I’ve thought about it. It’s going to be a different morning, different lead-in to the race. After 16 of them, you have a cadence and anticipation for the buildup. That’s all going to be different this year.

“I’m confident it’s not going to affect the type of show we put on or the excitement and how aggressive we are fighting for an Indy 500 win. It’s still going to mean the same thing. We’re just not going to have our fans to celebrate with after the fact. But it’s going to be historic.”