MotorSportsTalk 2015 Rolex 24 at Daytona Saturday blog

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12:15 p.m. ET – More than 10 hours are in the books and the best part of the race has been a double-barreled scrap for the lead in two of the four classes.

Larson and Ricky Taylor exchanged the top spot several times with Larson ahead overall at the 10-hour mark.

Meanwhile in the GTLM class, five cars have traded the top spot. Right now, it’s Pierre Kaffer in the No. 62 Risi Competizione Ferrari F458 Italia on top.

This will be my last update in this post before doing a separate round of updates on Sunday… since it’s now Sunday.

11:11 p.m. ET – The race is back green after a yellow for the Action Express Racing Corvette DP, the No. 5 car that won last year, stopped on track with fuel pressure issues per IMSA Radio.

Meanwhile NASCAR star Kyle Larson is now behind the wheel of the No. 02 Chip Ganassi Racing Riley-Ford.

10:15 p.m. ET – The race is past the eight-hour mark, I’m starting to get a little punchy, and the man, the myth, the legend that is Rommy – anyone who has been at a NASCAR, IndyCar or sports car race in years will know who he is – has taken over the Magnus Racing webcast.

Yes, there is still a race going on, but lord have mercy this is surreal.

9:25 p.m. ET – Francois Perrodo has not covered himself in glory this month at Daytona.

The French gentleman driver, paired with two Ferrari aces in Gianmaria Bruni and Toni Vilander and former Rolex 24 overall winner Emmanuel Collard, spun at Turn 6 but then later attempted another baffling reentry into the track. In doing so, he took out a harmless and luckless Brandon Davis, who was in the polesitting No. 007 TRG-AMR Aston Martin Vantage GT3.

This is Perrodo’s second wreck this month after also crashing during the Roar Before the Rolex 24 test in the No. 51 AF Corse Ferrari F458 Italia.

While TRG-AMR team principal Kevin Buckler had every right to go off in a TV interview, he was very restrained and respectful under the circumstances.

“I don’t even know what to say. Francois something,” Buckler told FOX Sports’ Andrew Marriott. “How can you not see us coming in there? My god. Brandon had a great drive. Christina (Nielsen) was gonna get in. Riduclous. Gotta be real careful. No excuses. We worked for a year for this.”

With the TRG-AMR car now damaged, it brought out the sixth full-course caution of the race.

Meanwhile the No. 02 Chip Ganassi Racing Riley-Ford has been in-and-out of the garage to make a splitter change. Tony Kanaan was running in second but lost a lap.

17-year-old Matt McMurry now leads overall in the No. 60 Michael Shank Racing Ligier JS P2 Honda.

9:00 p.m. ET – One of the Mazdas is out. The No. 70 SpeedSource Mazda SKYACTIV-D is officially out with what the team termed, comprehensive oil pump failure. Meanwhile the Magnus Porsche is back out after a quick gearbox change. Yes, it cost the team 27 laps, but as a full-season entrant it’s all about getting points.

Class leaders as the race nears the 7-hour mark include Joey Hand (P), Mark Wilkins (PC), Olivier Beretta (GTLM) and Ben Keating (GTD). Multiple cars in all classes – roughly two to nine cars per class – remain on the lead lap.

7:55 p.m. ET – Trouble has hit two engaging cars. Gearbox issues have sidelined the No. 44 Magnus Racing Porsche 911 GT America, then driven by Andy Lally, and apparent oil pressure issues have sent the No. 57 Krohn Racing Ligier JS P2 Judd, then driven by Alex Brundle, to the garage.

The Krohn car stands out for its “Krohn Green” livery and Magnus, which also has a shade of green along with gray and white on its car, has a 24-hour webcast it’s streaming during the race. These are two instances where it was not easy being green.

7:15 p.m. ET – Sage Karam is ridiculous, and I mean that in the best way possible.

Karam took the lead on the strength of a bonkers, three-wide outside pass around the outside of Taylor’s No. 10 and CGR teammate Jamie McMurray in the sister No. 02, while also in GT Le Mans traffic.

“It’s one of the craziest things of my career I’d say,” Karam said in the Daytona press room. “Jamie was in front of me. We got checked up, I went on the outside, took it, and it got kinda sketchy there. But I made it through in turn 1. We put in consistent laps from there.”

Karam led most of his stint until turning back to Joey Hand. Karam said he wanted “a massage and food” … and also wants to seal up a long-awaited full-season Verizon IndyCar Series deal.

“I’m pretty wound up. I’m fighting to get a full-season drive… hopefully in a Ganassi IndyCar,” Karam said. “So I’m driving pretty hard out there. And now I want a massage and to eat. And then sleep… I’m probably back in around 2 a.m.”

5:25 p.m. ET – The No. 2 Tequila Patron ESM HPD ARX-04b is also retired, with the team determining the cause of retirement.

Meanwhile we had a near disaster when Long Beach Grand Prix head and annual Daytona participant Jim Michaelian spun the No. 19 Muehlner Motorsports America Porsche 911 GT America at the first hairpin, and then attempted to rejoin by slowly going across the road and forcing Sebastiaan Bleekemolen onto the grass. Bleekemolen did well to avoid him but was a near Gaston Kearby-at-Sebring last year-esque type of maneuver.

Jordan Taylor, now in the No. 10 Wayne Taylor Racing Corvette DP after taking over from brother Ricky led overall during the third full course caution – caused, incidentally – by Michaelian stopping again between oval turns 1 and 2. The field has now gone back to green.

4:45 p.m. ET – First confirmed retirement for 2015 is the No. 0 DeltaWing DWC13, unfortunate given the car’s early pace. Gearbox – a new one for this race – is the culprit. Only Andy Meyrick had the chance to drive, with co-drivers Katherine Legge, Gabby Chaves and Memo Rojas unable to have a shot.

4:30 p.m. ET – Two hours are in the books. And a monumental achievement has just been achieved, as Tom Long at one point took the overall lead in the No. 07 SpeedSource Mazda SKYACTIV-D diesel prototype, for the developmental car.

The No. 0 DeltaWing and No. 98 Aston Martin are in trouble, and the No. 25 BMW got a left rear puncture that led to an irate Bill Auberlen – who went off on Porsche’s Nick Tandy on IMSA Radio.

Auberlen called Tandy an “idiot” live on air, and Tandy replied that this was another of the pair’s history of disagreements.

Did we mention we’re just two hours into this thing? For a bit of normality, Scott Dixon still leads for Ganassi, before NASCAR star Jamie McMurray takes over next.

3:35 p.m. ET – Full-course yellow number two has flown for a myriad of incidents. Damien Faulkner had a strange incident in the run into turn 1 in the No. 81 GB Autosport Porsche 911 GT America with his left rear bumper damaged. Andy Meyrick and Tom Kimber-Smith have both stopped on track at Turn 5, with Meyrick in the No. 0 DeltaWing DWC13 coupe and “TKS” in the No. 52 PR1/Mathiasen Motorsports Oreca FLM09. Meanwhile the No. 31 Corvette DP and No. 97 Turner Motorsport BMW Z4 GT3 have gone to the garage.

Class leaders are Scott Dixon (P and overall), Johnny Mowlem (PC), Oliver Gavin (GTLM) and Jeroen Bleekemolen (GTD).

3:20 p.m. ET – Hello from Daytona Beach, where the first hour of the 53rd Rolex 24 at Daytona is in the books. The race is just back green following the first full-course caution for the stopped Audi R8 LMS of Satoshi Hoshino, driving the No. 45 Flying Lizard Motorsports entry.

Three-time Verizon IndyCar Series champion Scott Dixon dominated the opening hour in the No. 02 Chip Ganassi Racing Riley-Ford, after taking the lead from polesitter Ozz Negri in the No. 60 Michael Shank Racing Ligier JS P2 Honda.

Other class leaders at the one-hour mark included Johnny Mowlem (PC), Oliver Gavin (GTLM) and Daniel Serra (GTD).

More to follow throughout the day on MotorSportsTalk.

Miguel Oliveira wins MotoGP Thai Grand Prix, Bagnaia closes to two points in championship

MotoGP Thai Grand Prix
Mirco Lazzari / Getty Images
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Miguel Oliveira mastered mixed conditions on the Chang International Circuit in Buriram, Thailand to win the MotoGP Thai Grand Prix. Oliveira showed the adaptability as he navigated a race that began in wet conditions and turned dry over the course of the race. Oliveira won the Indonesian GP in similar conditions.

“It was a long race, but I can’t complain,” Oliveira said on CNBC. “Every time we get to ride in the wet, I’m always super-fast. When it started raining, I had flashbacks of Indonesia. I tried to keep my feet on the ground, make a good start and not make mistakes and carry the bike to the end.”

All eyes were on the championship, however. Francesco Bagnaia got a great start to slot into second in Turn 1.

Meanwhile Fabio Quartararo had a disastrous first lap. He lost five positions in the first couple of turns and then rode over the rumble strips and fell back to 17th. At the end of the first lap, Bagnaia had the points’ lead by two. A win would have added to the gain and for a moment, it appeared Bagnaia might assume the lead.

Early leader Marco Bezzecchi was penalized for exceeding track limits, but before that happened, Jack Miller got around Bagnaia and pushed him back to third. Oliveira was not far behind.

After throwing away ninth-place and seven points on the last lap of the Japanese GP last week, Bagnaia did not allow the competition to press him into a mistake. He fell back as far as fourth before retaking the final position on the podium.

“It’s like a win for me, this podium,” Bagnaia. “My first podium in the wet and then there was a mix of conditions, so I’m very happy. I want to thank Jack Miller. Before the race, he gave me a motivational chat.”

Miller led the first half of the Thai Grand Prix before giving up the top spot to Oliveira and then held on to finish second. Coupled with his Japanese GP win, Miller is now fully in the MotoGP championship battle with a 40-point deficit, but he will need a string of results like Bagnaia has put together in recent weeks – and he needs Bagnaia to lose momentum.

Miller’s home Grand Prix in Australia is next up on the calendar in two weeks.

Bagnaia entered the race 18 points behind Quartararo after he failed to score any in Japan. The balance of power has rapidly shifted, however, with Quartararo now failing to earn points in two of the last three rounds. Bagnaia won four consecutive races and finished second in the five races leading up to Japan. His third-place finish in Thailand is now his sixth MotoGP podium in the last seven rounds.

Aleix Espargaro entered the race third in the standings with a 25-point deficit to Quartararo, but was able to close the gap by only five after getting hit with a long-lap penalty for aggressive riding when he pushed Darryn Binder off course during a pass for position. Espargaro finished 11th.

Rain mixed up the Moto2 running order in the MotoGP Thai Grand Prix as well. Starting on a wet track, Somkiat Chantra led the opening lap in his home Grand Prix. He could not hold onto it and crashed one circuit later, but still gave his countrymen a moment of pride by winning the pole.

Half points were awarded as the race went only eight laps before Tony Arbolino crossed under the checkers first with Filip Salac and Aron Canet rounding out the podium.

American Joe Roberts earned another top-10 in eighth with Sean Dylan Kelly finishing just outside the top 10 in 11th.