Kyle Busch has a message for those confusing him with his brother

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CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Kyle Busch has a message to those who have confused him with his brother, Kurt, in reporting about Kurt Busch’s recent court case.

“I think it’s stupid, I think people need to do a little bit more background before they write names or say names,’’ Kyle Busch said Monday during the NASCAR Sprint Cup media tour. “It’s not that hard to differentiate between two people that have the same last name. I think people need to do a better job and not be so slackish.’’

There have been some instances where Kyle Busch has been pictured or mentioned instead of his brother in the recent news about a hearing in a Dover, Del., family court involving Kurt Busch and his ex-girlfriend.

The case is a protective hearing order sought by Patricia Driscoll and gained national headlines after Kurt Busch said in court he believed Driscoll was a trained assassin. Summations are due shortly and a decision is expected soon afterward.

The Dover Police Department investigated Driscoll’s claim that Kurt Busch allegedly assaulted her in his motorhome in September at Dover International Speedway. The state Attorney General’s office has the report but has not yet decided if to pursue charges.

Kyle Busch was asked Monday how his brother is doing.

“Couldn’t tell you,’’ Kyle Busch said. “Haven’t spoken to him. Don’t know nothing. Trying to stay away from it all and let him handle his business.’’

Asked how feels about seeing his brother go through what he has, Kyle Busch said: “Obviously, it’s got to be painful for him. You don’t ever want to see anybody have to go through this sort of thing. Besides not getting too far involved in it, it’s about all I want to say.’’

New study surveys drivers’ opinions on crashes, concussions, more

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Auto racing safety has continued to improve through the decades, but the sport remains inherently dangerous, according to a new survey.

At the close of 2018, a new organization called Racing Safety United emerged with the intention of reducing drivers’ risk of being harmed.

RSU is made up of more than 30 members including former NASCAR Cup Series competitor Jerry Nadeau, two-time NASCAR Xfinity Series champion Randy LaJoie, NHRA team owner Don Schumacher and motorsports journalist Dick Berggren.

One of RSU’s first initiatives was to determine what current drivers thought of racing safety. The organization developed a 14-question survey and promoted it on select motorsports websites and forums. 

Participants were given the opportunity to disclose their identity or remain anonymous, and those who provided contact information were entered to win a $500 prize (for anonymous participants, the prize funds would be donated to a motorsports charity). 

More than 140 individuals participated in the survey over the course of 12 months. Below are the results of the survey:

Driver status

The vast majority of survey participants (60%) were amateur racers, while 26% of the participants were classified as Semi-Pro/Professional racers. The remaining 14% consisted of other individuals involved in the sport such as team owners and crew chiefs. 

When asked how frequently they race, 58% of driver respondents averaged 10 or more times per year on track, while 42% averaged 10 times or less.

The top five tracks respondents said they raced most often: Road Atlanta (21 votes), Watkins Glen (17 votes), Virginia International Raceway (16 votes), Mid-Ohio (16 votes), and Road America (13 votes).

Vehicular damage, injuries common

Over a third of respondents said they had been injured while racing, and almost two-thirds sasid they had suffered severe vehicle damage while racing

Driver error was cited as the top cause of vehicle damage (42 mentions), followed by concrete walls (26 mentions), mechanical failures (24 mentions), and other drivers (19 mentions). The study concluded those results indicated a need for better driver training/coaching, energy absorbing walls, and more technical inspections.

Almost a quarter of drivers said they had experienced racing-related concussions, and nearly half the respondents said one or multiple concussions would affect their decision to race in the future. 

Drivers primarily influenced by peers 

Roughly half the drivers said they would consider adopting new safety equipment if influenced by another driver (51 total mentions) and/or if recommended by a sanctioning body (47 total mentions). The study concluded those results indicated a need for drivers to become safety advocates and educate other drivers and for sanctioning bodies to mandate safety equipment. 

Drivers concerned with concrete walls

Approximately three-quarters of the drivers surveyed said they believed certain race tracks were more dangerous than others. Nearly half the drivers surveyed believe that concrete walls were the primary cause of damage to drivers and vehicles. 

Drivers willing to help

Just more than three-quarters of the drivers surveyed said that they would be willing to join a safety alliance to advocate for safer tracks. Two-thirds of drivers said that they also would be willing to contribute to a motorsports safety fund.

Click here for the full results of RSU’s survey

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