Young drivers star in mixed, primarily wet conditions at Watkins Glen

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One of the highlights of this past weekend’s IMSA event at Watkins Glen International, which featured the Sahlen’s Six Hours of the Glen as the TUDOR United SportsCar Championship headliner but also additional races from four other championships, was seeing so many young drivers drive so well in arguably the toughest conditions a driver can face.

Both Saturday’s Continental Tire SportsCar Challenge and Sunday’s TUDOR Championship races presented an opportunity for drivers to hang onto their cars on a dry track, drying track coming off rain, a wetter track where rain intensified, or a crazy heavy rain.

Here were the standout performers:

  • Cameron Lawrence, No. 93 Riley Motorsports Dodge Viper GT3-R, TUDOR. Lawrence, in only his third TUDOR start, ran smoothly while on slick tires as rain began to intensify from the fourth to fifth hours in the six-hour race. His final stint, taken after teammates Al Carter and Marc Goossens raced earlier in the event, helped place the car into position for Goossens to bring the car home to win. The under-the-radar 22-year-old should be on the radar for bigger teams, and in contention for a full-time ride in 2015.
  • Conor Daly, No. 38 Performance Tech Motorsports Oreca FLM09, TUDOR. I’ve written at length about “CD” this year and it baffles me as to why the 23-year-old from Noblesville, Ind. doesn’t have a full-time ride (yeah, OK, it comes down to financial reasons, but that doesn’t make it right given his efforts this year). In the opening hour of the race, Daly put more than a minute on the rest of the PC class field, nearly lapping it before the first yellow of the race. Daly has proven multiple times this year, both in IndyCar and sports cars, he can star in wet conditions – and it’s because they’re one of his favorites. “The car was amazing on the stint. I love these conditions. Sadly we got the yellow when we did which ruined the strategy. I was happy with what I could do,” Daly told IMSA Radio’s Shea Adam after his stint, after yet another great drive following a last-minute call-up.
  • Daniel Burkett, No. 16 BAR1 Motorsports Oreca FLM09, TUDOR. If Daly’s call-up was last-minute, Burkett’s was last-second. The 20-year-old from Winnipeg has previously been known for his red hair and humorous, self-deprecating “trying to find sponsorship” videos, but had his first test in a PC car with BAR1 only last week. It was only as of Thursday Burkett even knew he had a ride with the team for the race; once in the car, it didn’t take long for the Pro Mazda rookie to get within half a second or less of the team’s more experienced lead pro, Martin Plowman, a past 24 Hours of Le Mans class winner. Burkett led during his sports car debut and certainly opened some eyes, as together with Plowman and 17-year-old Matt McMurry they finished third in the PC class.
  • Ashley Freiberg, No. 46 Fall-Line Motorsports BMW M3, CTSC. Freiberg and the Fall-Line team, together with co-driver and defending GS class champion Trent Hindman, have had a challenging year with the venerable BMW M3 down on power compared to other cars in class. With rain the great equalizer, Freiberg stormed up to second in her stint at a track she’s won at before in another category. Hindman didn’t get a chance to match or exceed it with heavy rain forcing the race to end under yellow, but Freiberg, 23, had done enough to put the car a season-best second.
  • Austin Cindric, No. 158 Multimatic Motorsports Ford Shelby GT350R-C, CTSC. Cindric, youngest of this group at just 16, drove far beyond his years in the mixed conditions to take the debuting car to the lead at one point in his stint. It’s shaping up as a banner year for the son of Team Penske president Tim Cindric, who’s raced Bathurst, won the opening two GRC Lites races in Red Bull Global Rallycross, and has this full-season effort with Multimatic and Ford.
  • Kenton Koch, No. 60 JDC Motorsports, IMSA Cooper Tires Prototype Lites. In both dry and wet conditions, the lanky, personable and down-to-earth 20-year-old won his fourth and fifth races in six races this season. Koch turns 21 next month, but has already been a rising star in sports car racing for the last three years; he’s well on his way to adding a Prototype Lites title to the Mazda MX-5 Cup crown he achieved last year.

View from the pits: Reporters’ picks for the 103rd Indianapolis 500

INDYCAR / Jason Porter
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It’s Race Day in Indianapolis, and for the first time, the Indianapolis 500 will be on NBC.

Time will tell what impact Mother Nature has on today’s 103rd Running of the Greatest Spectacle in Racing. But no matter what, prerace coverage begins today on NBCSN at 9 a.m. ET, then transitions over to NBC at 11 a.m. ET.

All month long, the INDYCAR on NBC pit reporters have been bringing you the latest breaking news and stories for the Brickyard. Now, Kevin Lee, Kelli Stavast and Marty Snider share their insights from pit road. Read on …

KEVIN LEE

Throughout the last two weeks, one common theme has been, “Don’t crash.” There were five crashes, and four of those teams/drivers ended up in the Last Row Shootout. Two of the three bumped (Patricio O’Ward and Fernando Alonso) were in backup cars following heavy impacts.

Several drivers have consistently been among the strongest. Simon Pagenaud (pictured, left) not only starts on pole but has been strong in race trim as well. All three Ed Carpenter Racing cars are fast and appear good in traffic. Alexander Rossi looks like he can put his car wherever he wants, and Scott Dixon has five championships and 44 IndyCar wins, so he must be watched.

In order, my picks for most likely to drink the milk are Pagenaud, Rossi, Ed Carpenter, Will Power and Dixon.

KELLI STAVAST

A week ago, no one could have predicted that two-time world champion Fernando Alonso and McLaren Racing would be bumped from the Indy 500 by a single-car, part-time effort of Juncos Racing and its driver, Kyle Kaiser (pictured, right).  But it happened, and Kaiser now occupies the 33rd and final spot in the Greatest Spectacle in Racing.

So what next?  I spoke with Kyle five days after the dramatic qualifying effort, and he told me he has never been happier to finish last and that he is still “buzzing” from that experience—an energy he hopes to carry straight through to the race.  He also told me that the response from fans has been positive with people stopping him in public (including at Chipotle) to hug him and congratulate him on making the Big Show.

But reality might have set in for the Californian who now lives in Indy.  During Carb Day’s final practice, the team struggled to get a good handling car for Kyle, who described the day as “challenging.”  But Kaiser also acknowledged that the team made some progress throughout the practice and at the very least collected some data that might help for the 500-miler on Sunday.

Whether he finishes 1st or 31st on Sunday, Kyle Kaiser and Juncos Racing will have plenty of fond memories to carry with them from the 103rd Indy 500.

MARTY SNIDER

First, we cannot wait to bring you guys the 103rd running of the Indianapolis 500. It’s an honor for our entire group to broadcast such an amazing event.

So what do we expect? I have no idea, to be honest. The weather will be a huge factor today. It might be a race to halfway if rain is forecast.  If it’s cooler (mid 70’s ambient, which it looks like it’s going to be), Alexander Rossi (pictured, left) was unstoppable in those conditions last Monday.

But Rossi was very unhappy with his car on Carb Day. For that matter, most teams were. But Rob Edwards of Andretti Autosport explained a few things to Rossi about all of the experimenting they were doing in final practice, and I think that team is in a much better frame of mind heading into the race.

I find it interesting that Simon Pagenaud’s team scuffed in literally every set of tires they will use for today’s race. The No. 22 camp is convinced (and they’re not wrong) that one of the keys to Will Power’s 2018 win was his ability to gain time on out laps after pit stops. Scuffing in tires helps that out lap time. It also allows teams to do a balance check on tires. Good thing they did: Kyle Moyer of Team Penske found two sets that had vibrations, which would have been bad in the race.

Bottom line, I haven’t seen anyone really stand out and show me they can beat Alexander Rossi yet. So I’m going with Rossi to win his second Indy 500.

Enjoy the show friends. It’s going to be a fantastic race!