FIA stewards take no action over five-car incident on first lap of British Grand Prix

Leave a comment

The FIA stewards have confirmed that no action will be taken over the five-car incident on the first lap of Sunday’s British Grand Prix at Silverstone.

On lap one of the race, an incident at Farm involving Daniel Ricciardo, Romain Grosjean, Pastor Maldonado, Fernando Alonso and Jenson Button sparked an early safety car period.

A chain reaction was caused when Ricciardo and Grosjean made contact, forcing the Frenchman into Lotus teammate Maldonado.

In turn, this forced Alonso to jolt to the right and into the path of McLaren teammate Button, launching the Briton into the air.

Grosjean and Button were both eliminated on the spot, whilst Maldonado managed to return to the pits before retiring from the race.

The stewards confirmed in the aftermath of the incident that they would be investigating after the race, when they deemed that no one driver was to blame.

“No further action is warranted,” a report from the FIA read.

“After hearing from all the drivers involved in the turn three incident at the start of the race, it was decided that no driver was wholly or predominately to blame.”

Speaking after the race, Grosjean suggested that Ricciardo was in fact to blame for the incident after underestimating his brakes and tires on the opening lap.

“That was a very short race for the team and I feel for everyone here at Silverstone and at Enstone,” the Frenchman said. “Daniel must have thought his brakes and tires would be able to slow him better than they did and the result was the end of both my and Pastor’s race.

“No-one likes to end a grand prix like that as so much effort goes into making and preparing the cars. I know we have many fans who want to see us race so I feel for them too.”

After being resigned to his first retirement in three races, Maldonado was surprisingly upbeat and passive about the incident.

“At first I thought I had a puncture and would be able to return to the pits and re-join the race but unfortunately the damage to the car was more serious than that and I had to retire,” Maldonado said.

“There is nothing you can do in situations like these as it’s all part of racing. Now my focus is on the next race where we’ll be trying our very best as always.”

Ricciardo would ultimately retire from the race due to an electrical issue, whilst Alonso managed to finish in tenth place and score his first point of the 2015 season.

F1: Lewis Hamilton roars back from starting 14th to win German GP, regain points lead

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Heading into Sunday’s German Grand Prix, Lewis Hamilton wasn’t given much of a chance after qualifying so poorly (14th) one day earlier.

But in one of the most significant rallies of the 2018 Formula One season, Hamilton roared back to not only win at Hockenheim, but also regain the lead in the F1 drivers championship standings at the halfway point of the season.

Ditto for Mercedes in the Constructors Championship.

“It was so tough out there,” Hamilton told Sky Sports/ESPN. “Conditions were perfect for business time. When it rained, I knew I’d have a good position, but you never know what’s going to happen behind the safety car.”

Despite rainy conditions for part of the race, not to mention wet overall conditions that caused a number of drivers to spin, Hamilton won the 66th race of his F1 career (44th with Mercedes AMG Petronas) in a time of 1:32.29.845 and took home 25 points for his fourth win of 2018.

It’s the furthest back a driver has come from back in the pack to win since Fernando Alonso started 15th and won the Singapore Grand Prix in 2008.

The win comes just a couple days after Hamilton re-signed with Mercedes AMG through the 2020 season, leading him to pay an immediate return on investment, so to speak.

“It’s obviously very, very difficult (to win) from that position and highly unlikely, but you’ve always got to believe,” Hamilton said. “I said a long, long prayer before the race started.

“When we did the parade lap, I could see how much support we had and I just wanted to stay collected and stay calm. The team did such a great job today, the car was fantastic, I’m so grateful.

“I would never have thought you could do something like that today, but I kept pushing and kept believing and it happened, so I really manifested my dreams today. Thanks to God.”

It was also the 125th F1 podium finish of Hamilton’s career.

To make the win even sweeter, Hamilton’s teammate, Valtteri Bottas, finished second, the first time in German GP history that homeland team Mercedes has finished 1-2.

It’s Bottas’ fifth podium of the season, all being runner-up finishes.

Kimi Raikkonen finished third, 6.5 seconds behind Hamilton, followed my Max Verstappen and Nico Hulkenberg. For Raikkonen, it was his 28th podium since his last win.

Sixth through 10th were Romain Grosjean, Sergio Perez, Esteban Ocon, Marcus Ericsson and Brendon Hartley.

Kevin Magnussen finished 11th, followed by Carlos Sainz, Stoffel Vandoorne, Pierre Gasly, Charles Leclerc and Fernando Alonso was the last running car, finishing 16th.

Failing to finish (17th through 20th) were Lance Stroll, pole sitter Sebastian Vettel (who made a mistake and crashed), Sergey Sirotkin and Daniel Ricciardo.

Follow @JerryBonkowski