Smiling Through the Rain: Silverstone proved that it isn’t all doom and gloom in F1

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When you think about the British, a number of stereotypes will most probably come to mind. As MotorSportsTalk’s resident Brit, I can probably set a few of them straight.

No, we don’t all drink tea – although my friends do think it strange I prefer coffee.

Yes, we are overly polite and say ‘sorry’ far too often. We then apologize for apologizing.

However, the biggest thing that we are known for having is a ‘stiff upper lip,’ defined as “remaining resolute and unemotional in the face of adversity”.

And in the case of Formula 1, the British mentality was much-needed over the past weekend.

There is a great deal of doom and gloom in F1 at the moment, as perfectly exemplified in Friday’s FIA press conference when Force India owner Vijay Mallya coined the term “uncrap” and Lotus CEO Matthew Carter blamed the media for being too negative about the sport.

F1 is by no means perfect at the moment. The financial crisis rages on, and the on-track action has left much to be desired. However, you should have tried telling that to the 140,000 fans that packed out Silverstone on Sunday for the grand prix.

And boy, did they get a reward for their passion and support.

The British Grand Prix was perhaps the best of the season so far. I noted after the race that it was an ‘average result, but a far from average race’ – it was one that captured the imagination of the watching public and really left you on the edge of your seat.

It was totally different to the grands prix that we have seen of late. Although they have been entertaining in places, few have had much of a fight at the front of the field. It has ordinarily been left to either Lewis Hamilton or Nico Rosberg to dominate proceedings and the rest to fight over the scraps.

At Silverstone though, we were treated to a brilliant four-way fight for the win as Williams got in the mix. The British team once again opted to play it safe, not splitting Felipe Massa and Valtteri Bottas’ strategies, which ultimately left them fourth and fifth at the flag after queuing in the pits late on.

It was a terribly British affair, even right down to the weather. I wrote in my preview earlier this week that Britain was in the midst of a heatwave. Having spent Tuesday baking in the sun in London and most of Wednesday complaining about my sunburn, I expected the heat to transfer to Silverstone for the race and play into Ferrari’s hands.

Ironically, it was a rain shower that actually worked for Ferrari by giving Sebastian Vettel his first podium finish since the Monaco Grand Prix. “In the end, that’s England for you,” he said after the podium. “[A] couple of minutes later you have sunshine.”

The rain did spice up the race, undoubtedly. Without it, Hamilton would most probably have eased home, leaving Massa, Bottas and Rosberg to fight over P2, P3 and P4.

However, the shower made the Briton work for his victory, bringing out the best of him both as a driver and as a strategist. The brilliance of his call to pit for intermediates cannot be underestimated.

Will the race go down as an all-time classic? It’s unlikely. However, it will go down as an important one in Lewis Hamilton’s career, and in the context of the 2015 season, it brought some joy to F1.

Because if you believed that all was discussed with regards to F1 was negative, 140,000 fans would not have flocked to Silverstone on race day. Perhaps the more impressive fact is that 110,000 ventured to the remote Northamptonshire circuit for qualifying. These are big numbers that few other circuits can even get close to.

What must be accepted is that occasionally a grand prix won’t feature dozens of overtakes or a big crash or anything of note. Some races are akin to the 0-0 draw in soccer. That is the nature of sport.

In soccer though, you aren’t restricted to just 19 games per season – 380 Premier League matches alone in 2014/2015 – showing how F1 has far less of a opportunity to get it right.

And the fans that went to Silverstone on Sunday knew that it could easily have been a dull affair. Few would have begrudged Hamilton a dreary win, such is his support at his home race, but the neutral in the stands may have questioned whether spending £300 on a grandstand ticket was a wise investment.

That is the nature of the British fan, though. A passion and fervor exists that makes Silverstone a race like few others – in my eyes, Austin and Montreal are the only ones that compares in terms of atmosphere – and it was exactly what F1 needed. In a time of dwindling track attendances, the British Grand Prix swam against the stream.

What is required in F1 at the moment is a little more acceptance. Times do get tough. Races will sometimes be a little tedious.

But when you get a weekend like this, with 140,000 fans sticking it out in the pouring rain to cheer on an enthralling on-track spectacle, you remember just why F1 is dubbed the pinnacle of motorsport.

F1 could perhaps stand to be a little more British in its approach. Get the stiff upper lip and get through the tough times instead of pointing the finger and making knee-jerk changes, because it isn’t all bad.

Even through the rain of Silverstone, the sun can shine.

Chase Sexton wins Triple Crown Anaheim 2 Supercross: Levi Kitchen unseats Jett Lawrence in 250s

Supercross Anaheim 2
Feld Motor Sports/MX Sports Pro Racing/Align Media
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Chase Sexton won two of the three races in the Monster Energy Supercross Anaheim 2 Triple Crown, which was enough to overcome a fifth-place finish in Race 2 and give him the overall victory. It was the second Supercross win of his career.

“Super big night for me,” Sexton told NBC Sports’ Will Christien. “After last weekend with that being a struggle, I just need to come out here and stop the bleeding a little bit and I did that tonight.”

Sexton suffered a crash on Lap 1 of his heat, sending him into Last Chance Qualifier. The bad gate pick put him in a difficult position to start the race and he was able to climb to only fifth at the checkers.

At Anaheim 2, three riders entered the final race of the Triple Crown in a winner-take-all scenario. Sexton, Jason Anderson and Eli Tomac each had a shot at victory. It raised the intensity level for all riders in an evening that featured a lot of comers and goers.

Jason Anderson took the early lead in Race 3, which set him up for the overall victory. Sexton stalked and passed him midway through the race and then a minor mistake late allowed Webb to slip around as well. Anderson’s 5-1-3 gave him second overall.

“I had a tough couple of rounds, getting off that Anaheim 1 crash and then last week weekend I fumbled a little bit, but I’m excited to get back on the box and start moving forward,” Anderson told Jason Thomas.

Anderson finished seventh in the first two rounds of 2023.

RESULTS: How they finished for the 450 Main in Anaheim 2

Ken Roczen was the model of consistency in the opening rounds and at Anaheim 2. In three races so far this year, he’s gotten progressively better each time with a fifth in A1, a fourth last week in San Deigo and a third this week.

With results of 2-3-4, he earned his first podium of the season, which lands him fourth in the standings.

“This was hard earned,” Roczen said after the race. “I completely botched the start and then to have to work my way up. I only happen on the very last lap to step up here on the podium.”

Webb’s solid second-place finish in the third race allowed him to leapfrog several riders and finish fourth overall, but a seventh in Race 1 kept him off the podium. He improved in each race in Anaheim, however, with a 7-4-2.

With a 4-6-5, Dylan Ferrandis rounded out the top five.

The intensity of the race was a little too much for Tomac.

While battling side-by-side with Webb in Race 3 at the one-third mark, Tomac jumped wide and crashed hard. He fell to 14th, doing some damage to his bike in the process. He advanced only one position in that race to 13th. His first two races, a third and second, were strong enough to give him sixth overall. He retains the points lead, but it has shrunk to a gap of only four over Sexton and Webb.

Malcolm Stewart injured late in the week and was not able to mount.


Levi Kitchen became the first rider to unseat Jett Lawrence in the Triple Crown format at Anaheim 2 and won the overall with consistency. In his three races, Kitchen finished 4-2-2 to narrowly edge the winner of the first two races.

“This whole day; this is unbelievable. I took a few good slams in practice and I was down on myself,” Kitchen told NBC Sports Jason Thomas afterward. “The first moto I got a good start and got shuffled back, then I knew I just needed to be consistent.”

Jett Lawrence saved his best for last – which wasn’t hard given the struggles he experienced in the first two races.

Despite those problems, he entered Race 3 of the Triple Crown three points behind Kitchen after suffering a pair of disappointing races by his personal measuring stick. In the first and second 250 races of the night, Lawrence hit the ground. He dropped to the final rider in the running order in Race 2 with a Lap 1 fall. But in both races, he was able to overcome his mistake and close the gap so that he had a chance to take his first Triple Crown win of his career.

Click here for full 250 West Main Results

Lawrence rode to third in Race 1 and sixth in Race 2. In the final race of the night, Lawrence did all he could. He earned the holeshot, but when Kitchen fell in behind him, Lawrence’s fate was sealed. His 3-6-1 tied him in points with Stilez Robertson, but the tiebreaker goes to the final round and his win secured second-place.

“I can definitely say Triple Crowns are not my thing,” Lawrence told NBC Sports Will Christien. “We have one more to try and fix this, so hopefully we can get that done.”

Lawrence will move into the 450 class for the Lucas Oil Motocross outdoor season and his 250 record book will be closed.

The best news for Lawrence is the other riders who entered this round in the top three had a worse night, so Lawrence leaves Anaheim with a 16-point gap on Cameron McAdoo and 17 over RJ Hampshire.

Roberston finished 6-1-3 to take the final step of the podium.

“Getting that win in the second Main meant a lot,” Roberston told Thomas. “I wish I could have done a little better in the third one, but we’re still up here on the box.”

Mitchell Oldenburg used consistency to earn fourth in the overall. He finished 5-4-6.

After missing the Main last week in San Diego, Max Vohland finished 7-8-4 to round out the top five.

RJ Hampshire set himself up as the early favorite with his Race 1 win. In Race 2, it all fell apart. He fell in the sand section and damaged his bike, finishing last in that race. The final event of the night for the 250s provided only a 13th-place finish, leaving Hampshire deep in the points.

Cameron McAdoo hard crash in qualification, which was scary news for a team that has seen three of their riders sidelined with injury. McAdoo was never quite able to get his rhythm with an 8-7-5.

2023 Race Recaps

San Diego: Eli Tomac, Jett Lawrence double down
Anaheim 1: Tomac wins opener for the first time

Anaheim 2 coverage

Power Rankings Week 2
SuperMotocross tightens playoff schedule
Eli Tomac, Jett Lawrence go two-for-two in San Diego
Results and points after San Diego
Seth Hammaker to miss 250 E season opener with wrist injury
Jo Shimoda joins Seth Hammaker, Austin Forkner with injury
Injury sidelines Austin Forkner for remainder of 2023 SX