Hamilton goes wire-to-wire for third Italian Grand Prix victory

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Lewis Hamilton extended his lead at the top of the Formula 1 drivers’ championship to 53 points by winning Sunday’s Italian Grand Prix at Monza in emphatic fashion.

After scoring his 11th pole position of the season on Saturday, Hamilton went lights-to-flag at Monza to lead home Ferrari’s Sebastian Vettel by 25 seconds.

Mercedes’ weekend was far from perfect, though, as championship contender Nico Rosberg suffered an engine failure with three laps remaining, resigning the German to his first retirement of the 2015 season.

At the start of the race, Kimi Raikkonen bogged down in first gear from second place to fall to the very back of the pack as the rest of the field streamed past. Hamilton managed to defend his lead from Vettel before opening up a gap over the first few laps, whilst Rosberg dropped down to P6 to leave himself with a mountain to climb.

Raikkonen began his fightback in the laps that would follow, rising into the top ten after five laps thanks to clean moves on the Red Bull and McLaren drivers. He also gained positions when the two Lotus drivers retired after just one lap, bringing an early end to a difficult weekend for the British team.

At the front, Hamilton began to open up a gap to Vettel behind as Rosberg bid to make up for his poor start. The German driver made a good move to pass Sergio Perez for fifth place before latching onto the back of Williams’ Valtteri Bottas. However, he was told to be careful with his brakes due to excessive wear, causing him to drop back again.

Rosberg was forced into pitted early on lap 18 in the bid to get the undercut on the Williams drivers ahead, moving onto the medium tire that would last him to the end of the race. Before stopping, the German driver had already fallen over 20 seconds behind Hamilton at the front, who in turn was over 12 seconds clear of the field.

The undercut worked well for Rosberg as he got the jump on Felipe Massa, who had been running P3 before stopping. Williams opted to keep Bottas out for a few more laps before stopping, leaving the Finn to come out behind Rosberg and Massa.

Hamilton was the last of the leaders to pit on lap 26, moving onto the medium compound tire. Vettel had pitted just one lap earlier, but remain some 18 seconds behind in second place after the pit cycle, giving Hamilton plenty of breathing room up front.

Rosberg’s fightback continued at the expense of Raikkonen, who had worked his way up to third place with a long first stint. His starting tires were beginning to fade, though, allowing Rosberg to take P3 before Ferrari brought the Finn in for his solitary pit stop at the end of lap 28. He emerged back out on track in P10 behind Marcus Ericsson, having narrowly avoided being hit by Roberto Merhi at pit entry.

As Hamilton’s lead rose to over 20 seconds at the front, Mercedes turned attention to Rosberg in third place in a bid to score another one-two finish. The German driver ran five seconds behind Vettel after both had pitted, but with his tires some seven laps older, it would be a big challenge for Rosberg to leapfrog his compatriot in the second half of the race.

Further back, Raikkonen continued his charge by passing both Ericsson and Nico Hulkenberg soon after pitting, moving himself up into seventh place with 15 laps remaining. In the battle to make the points, Daniel Ricciardo’s long first stint had launched him up into tenth position, giving Red Bull some solace after a trying weekend.

With three laps remaining, the championship race took a huge twist as Rosberg’s engine began to exude smoke before eventually failing at the Roggia chicane, forcing him to pull over and retire from the race.

At the head of the field though, Hamilton was given a late scare when Mercedes told him to pull out a gap at the front of the field and push hard, telling him that they would explain after the race. He managed to remain in the lead until the flag, completing a lights-to-flag victory.

Some 25 seconds later, Vettel crossed the line in second after coming under heavy pressure from Rosberg in the closing stages. Traffic had caused trouble for both drivers, but it was Vettel who managed to stay ahead and give the loyal Ferrari fans at Monza something to cheer for.

Lucking in from Rosberg’s failure was Felipe Massa, who crossed the line just three-tenths of a second clear of teammate Valtteri Bottas to finish third for Williams. Kimi Raikkonen’s fightback finished with him in P5 ahead of Sergio Perez and Nico Hulkenberg, whilst Daniel Ricciardo finished eighth. Marcus Ericsson and Daniil Kvyat rounded out the top ten.

Carlos Sainz Jr. and Max Verstappen fought well for Toro Rosso to finish 11th and 12th, whilst Felipe Nasr followed them home in 13th. Jenson Button finished P14 ahead of Manor drivers Will Stevens and Roberto Merhi. Fernando Alonso retired from the race late on, ending a tough weekend for McLaren.

In the moments following the checkered flag, the stewards issued a statement calling for both Hamilton and Rosberg due to a supposed issue with their tire pressures before the start of the race, reasoning Mercedes’ call for Hamilton to push in the closing stages.

For the time being though, Hamilton remains the winner of the Italian Grand Prix, and now enjoys a 53-point lead over Rosberg in the drivers’ championship heading to the Singapore Grand Prix in two weeks’ time.

Nasser Al-Attiyah, Toby Price win Dakar Rally

Dakar.com, Frederic le Floc'h / DPPI
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Driving a safe final stage that placed him 12th across the line, Nasser Al-Attiyah claimed his third Dakar Rally victory on Thursday. Toby Price claimed his second Dakar win in motorcycles after winning the final stage.

Al-Attiyah could afford to play it safe since he entered the stage with a 51-minute advantage over the field. Price barely had a minute to spare and was forced to push hard through the short 112-kilometer course.

Price’s victory was all the more dramatic in light of his riding the entire rally with a pin in his wrist from a broken scaphoid bone.

In the Quads class, Nicolas Cavigliasso showed his dominance by winning nine of the 10 stages.

Here are some of the other highlights:

In the cars class, Last year’s overall class winner, Carlos Sainz finally earned a stage win, but it was too little, too late. … Sebastien Loeb challenged for the class win throughout the stage and finished less than one minute back. … Cyril Despres rounded out the top three. … Nani Roma finished sixth, four minutes behind the leader, but less than five minutes ahead of Nasser Al-Attiyah.

Class Leaders: Al-Attiyah won his third Dakar by a margin of 46:42 over Roma and one hour, 54:18 over Loeb.

In motorcycles, Toby Price saved the best for last. He won his first stage of the rally and secured the class win. … His victory came with a margin of 2:21 over Jose Florima. … Matthias Walkner enter entered the stage with an opportunity to take the overall lead. His third-place finish was not bad, but it came with his principal rival finishing first. … Pablo Quintanilla took a fall early in the stage and injured his foot. Riding hurt, he finished the stage 22nd – nearly 20 minutes off the pace. … American Andrew Short finished seventh for his eighth top 10 of the rally.

Class Leaders: Price ended the rally with the biggest advantage of the year. He beat Walkner by 9:13. Sam Sunderland finished third, 13:34 behind the leader.

In side by sides, Reinaldo Varela won his second consecutive stage and third overall. … He had a comfortable margin of 3:39 over Cristian Baumgart and 6:10 over Francisco Lopez Contardo.

Class Leaders: Contardo’s third-place finish in the stage was more than enough to secure the class victory over Gerard Farres Guell, who finished one hour, 2:35. Varela finished one hour, 5:19 behind in third.

In quads, In a show of utter dominance, Nicolas Cavigliasso won his ninth stage of the year. … Alexandre Giroud stood on the podium for the fourth time this year. While he didn’t win a stage, he never finished worse than sixth. … Jeremias Gonzalez Ferioli rounded out the top three.

Class Leaders: Cavigliasso won by an advantage of one hour, 55:37 over Ferioli and two hours, 11:38 over Gustavo Gallego

In trucks, Ton Van Genugton rebounded from a poor Stage 9 in which he finished 12th to win his second stage of the rally. … Ales Loprais scored his first podium of the rally; his previous best finish was fourth in Stage 9. … Dmitry Sotnikov stood on the final rung of the podium.

Class Leaders: Eduard Nikolaev finished sixth in the stage, but won with an advantage of 25:36 over Sotnikov and one hour, 34:44 over Gerard de Rooy

Stage Wins

Motorcycles
Sam Sunderland [2] (Stage 5 and 7), Matthias Walkner [2] (Stage 2 and 8), Joan Barreda [1] (Stage 1), Xavier de Soultrait [1] (Stage 3), Ricky Brabec [1] (Stage 4), Pablo Quintanilla [1] (Stage 6), Michael Metge [1] (Stage 9) and Toby Price [1] (Stage 10)

Quads
Nicolas Cavigliasso [9] (Stage 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10) and Jeremias Gonzalez Ferioli [1] (Stage 3)

Cars
Sebastien Loeb [4] (Stage 2, 5, 6 and 8), Nasser Al-Attiyah [3] (Stage 1, 4 and 9), Stephane Peterhansel [2] (Stage 3 and 7) and [1] Carlos Sainz

Side-by-sides
Francisco Lopez Contardo [4] (Stage 2, 6, 7 and 8), Reinaldo Varela [3] (Stage 1, 9 and 10), Gerard Farres Guell [1] (Stage 3), Sergei Kariakin [1] (Stage 4) and Rodrigo Piazzoli [1] (Stage 5)

Trucks
Eduard Nikolaev [3] (Stage 1, 2, and 9), Andrey Karginov [2] (Stage 3 and 4), Ton Van Genugton [2] (Stage 5 and 10), Dmitry Sotnikov [2] (Stage 6 and 8), and Gerard de Rooy [1] (Stage 7)

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