Hulkenberg seeks end of tailspin, Ricciardo seeks BBQ after clash in Austin

Leave a comment

AUSTIN, Texas – “An Australian and a German walk into a Texas barbecue joint, sort out their issues and enjoy some delicious red meat.”

OK this isn’t reality but if ever there was a time, place or reason for Daniel Ricciardo and Nico Hulkenberg to get together and discuss in person their contact that happened during today’s United States Grand Prix, perhaps the legendary Salt Lick or Rudy’s in Austin would serve as a perfect venue.

Ricciardo and Hulkenberg’s races – which were both promising – came to a halt on Lap 36 when Hulkenberg and Ricciardo collided battling over fifth place at Turn 12.

After starting third, Ricciardo actually led seven laps from Laps 15 to 21, having got around Lewis Hamilton at one point. Hulkenberg ran as high as sixth in the opening laps.

It appeared as though Hulkenberg’s front wing was flexing and vibrating, and the issue didn’t help as Hulkenberg slid into the Australian. Ricciardo continued but Hulkenberg was done on the spot.

A post-race investigation by the stewards confirmed the technical issue was the cause of the accident, not driver error by Hulkenberg as he dove to the inside.

To hear Ricciardo tell it though, prior to the FIA confirmation, he put the blame on Hulkenberg.

“Yeah I saw him make a lunge, so I was aware he’d be close to the apex,” the Infiniti Red Bull Racing driver told NBC’s Will Buxton.

“He was sort of in my blind spot, so I didn’t take the apex, so I left a bit of room. I sort of opened the wheel, we touched and we wnet off. It felt off… him sort of overcooking it. Unless I went all the way off track I could have avoided it.

“Trying to be fair, I think that was his fault.”

Sahara Force India’s Hulkenberg didn’t exactly admit blame, but he did say the plan to pass didn’t go as intended.

“I saw my chance in taking Daniel. I wanted to go past him quickly,” Hulkenberg told Buxton. “He was holding me up quite a bit. It was damp where I was braking. It wasn’t ideal and unfortunately the move didn’t work.”

In the same interview with Buxton, Ricciardo threw another Red Bull-affiliated driver, Scuderia Toro Rosso’s Carlos Sainz, somewhat under the bus.

“With Carlos, there was contact which I thought could have been avoided,” said Ricciardo, who finished 10th. “He squeezed me on braking. Once you brake you should stay straight. We talk about it in driver meetings. It’s a part where you can’t really do much. You’re more or less not in control of moving left or right because you lock a wheel.

“I believe some other drivers weren’t too pleased with him today as well. It’s happened a few times in the past. We’ll wise him up a bit.”

But to close this chapter and turn things back to the headline, Hulkenberg will look to score points in Mexico next week after a run of three DNFs in four races.

“Yeah for sure,” Hulkenberg replied when he was asked whether this was a negative spiral.

“To get results you have to finish races, and these three haven’t been the best run for me.”

Ricciardo, meanwhile, seeks some good ‘ol fashioned Texas BBQ sustinence.

“I have been dieting all week,” Ricciardo told Buxton.

“For whatever reason the car was quite heavy this week, I was aware. They said, ‘This is the race you gotta try at least to not put on weight.

“I was like, ‘You guys are kidding me. We’re in bloody Texas and you’re telling me I can’t eat meat?’

“I’ve had no red meat all week. Tonight I’m gonna eat until I feel pretty sad.”

Ryan Hunter-Reay is all-in in bid to win second IndyCar championship

Photos: IndyCar
Leave a comment

The third time has truly been the charm for Ryan Hunter-Reay.

After back-to-back mediocre seasons in 2016 and 2017, the Fort Lauderdale, Florida resident is back where he belongs in 2018: in the hunt for what he hopes is his second Verizon IndyCar Series championship.

Hunter-Reay won the title in 2012. But he suffered through a 12th place finish in 2016 (the second-worst in his 12-year IndyCar career) and a ninth-place showing in 2017.

While he earned three podium finishes in both 2016 and 2017, he hadn’t reached victory lane since 2015.

That all changed just over two months ago when he and his Andretti Autosport team came through to take the checkered flag at Belle Isle.

Hunter-Reay celebrates after his win at Belle Isle in June.

Now, in addition to that win, Hunter-Reay has four podium finishes, his most since six each in 2012, 2013 and 2014.

And now, with four races left on the Verizon IndyCar Series schedule – starting with this Sunday’s ABC Supply 500 at Pocono Raceway – Hunter-Reay is enjoying the fruits of his success.

And he hopes there’s even more success to come in those four races, including – with the fortuitous opportunity to earn double points in the season finale at Sonoma Raceway – the potential to win his second championship.

The 2014 Indianapolis 500 winner heads to Pocono ranked fifth in the points standings, 95 points behind series leader Scott Dixon.

“I think overall we’ve been pretty strong, competitive everywhere we’ve gone,” Hunter-Reay said on Tuesday’s IndyCar media teleconference. “We’re back up at the front regularly fighting for podiums, and that’s important.

“No doubt, the past couple races have been missed opportunities (after finishing runner-up at Road America, he’s scored finishes of 19th at Iowa, 16th at Toronto seventh two weeks ago at Mid-Ohio).

“More often than not we show up at a racetrack and we’re contending. It’s been a strong season in many ways. There’s been some missed opportunities in there, no doubt. Hopefully we can close out the season.”

But Hunter-Reay also admits he’ll need some help.

Being 95 points down to Scott, what needs to happen now is we need to go on a run and he needs to start having some bad luck, some difficult races, some circumstances going against him, things like that, which it can do,” Hunter-Reay said. “You just have to keep your head down.

“In this series, it’s the same way in a race, you could be starting mid pack, back of the pack. If you go into it with the right mindset, keep your head down, be tenacious, persistent, you can win races, any of them, and you can win championships.

“Just have to keep focused and make the most of it. Number one thing we have to do is go on the offensive and make a run for it.”

Even with Dixon’s sizable lead, Hunter-Reay isn’t giving up his pursuit of the championship. In a sense, his battle this season is similar to what occurred in 2012. There were those who counted him out, and yet when the dust had settled, he emerged with the title.

“I learned a lot in my racing career, especially through the 2012 season, fighting for the championship with Helio (Castroneves) and Will Power,” Hunter-Reay said. “Once you thought somebody really had an upper hand, thought they were running away with it, everything turned around. There’s still a lot of racing to go (this season).

“Absolutely, we’re going for it, no doubt. We have to focus on every session, make the most of it, race wins. That’s what’s going to get you there.

“Going to Fontana (the 2012 season finale), nobody really had us at a shot of winning it. I forget what the points deficit was. At the end of the night we ended up winning by three points. It’s not over till the last lap, especially with double points on the line, could be a huge swing race.”

This weekend’s venue, Pocono Raceway, has been good to Hunter-Reay the last three years, winning in 2015, finishing third in 2016 and eighth in last year’s race.

“I think we have a great chance (for success at Pocono),” Hunter-Reay said. “I mean, the Pocono race is different than Indy. It is its own beast. It’s very particular in that in turn three with banking, it’s a true handling corner. Feels almost like a Milwaukee type of corner, but going twice the speed.

“You have to set your car up for that. You have to set your car up for turn one, which is a massively banked, tight radius corner. It comes more down to a handling aspect to balance, trying to get the setup right.

“I think we’re going to see a different type of race. I don’t think it’s just going to come down to top end speed, although that will help at Pocono. I think it’s going to be more of a handling race.”

However, with limited practice at Pocono – just two sessions on Saturday – his team will have to scramble to get things right as soon as they unload off the hauler.

“Yeah, it’s a major time crunch,” Hunter-Reay said. “(It’ll be) really hard to get all that done in a short amount of time. It’s really the compromise between turns three and one. That are polar opposites. One corner feels like it’s got no banking, no support to it, the other one is massive banking and a tight radius. It’s very difficult to get those two corners right and get the compromise right with the car when you’re along.

“Once you get into traffic, things change a lot. There will be a qualifying setup, a race setup. We have to do all this with two hours total track time. It will be very difficult, no doubt.”

Hunter-Reay points to the new-style IndyCar this year for his and his team’s uptick in performance in 2018 over the last two years.

“I think as a team we kind of struggled during the aero kit years,” he said. “Now that we’re back on a universal aero kit like we were when we had some success in 2012, ’13 and ’14.

“You show up on a race weekend, you know you have a chance. You’re going in there and the team is going to be able to give you the car that you potentially need to win.

“That makes all the difference really for a driver, just knowing week in and week out that you’ve got a shot at winning and making that run for the championship. I think that’s what we showed this year. It does a lot for your confidence and it really keeps you motivated, no doubt.”

While most race car drivers deny they worry about the standings or points race, Hunter-Reay refreshingly said he’s well aware of where he’s at in the IndyCar rankings – and will be looking forward to the end of Sunday’s race to see where he’ll be heading into the final three races.

“You can’t help but notice where you are (in the standings),” he said. “You really have to be focused on yourself and just winning. You can’t worry about who is where at what time in the weekend. You got to absolutely focus on putting yourself up front.

“After the race, first thing I ask is, ‘where are the guys that we’re fighting in the championship, where did they finish?’ It’s just a curiosity standpoint. You just have to stay focused on yourself.”

Follow @JerryBonkowski