Report: IndyCar’s Grand Prix of Boston CEO moves to ‘reduced role’

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Grand Prix of Boston CEO Mark J. Perrone has moved to what is being called a “reduced role,” according to a report last week in the Boston Herald.

“Mark is still the CEO of the Boston Grand Prix, he has taken a reduced role due to personal health reasons,” Grand Prix spokesman Sean Flanagan told the Herald in an email.

Even though he retains his CEO title, Perrone is reportedly “is no longer handling negotiations with the city and state to hold the race,” the paper reported, which Flanagan further confirmed.

The inaugural Grand Prix of Boston stop on the Verizon IndyCar Series is slated for Sept. 2-4, 2016 along Boston’s historic riverfront. It will be the second-to-last stop on that season’s IndyCar schedule.

The Herald has reported that Perrone has a criminal history dating back to pleading guilty in 1999 to federal tax charges that stemmed from filing tax returns in 1990 and 1991.

According to the Herald: “(Perrone) pleaded guilty to two counts of a lesser charge of failure to file timely returns, records show. Perrone was sentenced by then-Judge Richard Stearns to two years probation, according to court filings.”

However, Perrone’s reduced role with the Grand Prix organizing team is not related to his past tax problems.

“I do not see how Mark’s personal history is relevant to the event,” Flanagan said. “The Grand Prix is a private company and the event is 100 percent privately funded by local investors, which was outlined in the Letter of Intent agreed upon and signed last week (with the city of Boston and several state agencies who are working with organizers to hold a successful Grand Prix).”

Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh told the Herald the city is working directly with IndyCar officials and Grand Prix chief financial officer John Casey, and because of his recently reduced role, Perrone is not involved in negotiations.

“We’re working with IndyCar, so I really don’t want to comment on his personal taxes,” Walsh told the newspaper. “I don’t know the particulars around it. I don’t know what happened.

“I know what I read in the paper today. But I don’t know if that’s the full story.”

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