(Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)

Until he pit for fuel, Carlos Munoz ‘knew’ he had Indy 500 won

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Carlos Munoz was sure of three things throughout Sunday.

The first – the 100th running of the Indianapolis 500 was going to be his.

“I knew I had this won,” Munoz told ABC’s Rick DeBruhl after the race.

But the 24-year-old Colombian didn’t make this declaration as the 70th winner of the “Greatest Spectacle in Racing.” The Andretti Herta Autosport driver was lamenting the second runner-up finish of his career in the race.

“My car was flying,” Munoz said of his No. 26 United Fiber & Data Honda that had started fifth and was leading on Lap 195 of the race. “I was so good emotionally, physically, mentally. The car was flying.”

The second?

“I knew I didn’t have enough fuel.”

Munoz was a half-lap short on fuel and on Lap 196 pitted in order to rectify his situation. That move created the 54th and final lead change of the race, allowing rookie Alexander Rossi, and Munoz’ teammate, to assume the lead.

Rossi hadn’t pitted since Lap 164 and he wouldn’t in the last four laps.

When Munoz got back up to pace two laps later, he was in second, 16.68 seconds behind Rossi. A lap later, with the white flag displayed over the first sold-out crowd in the “500’s” history, Munoz had only gained three seconds.

“I was just cruising around flat out, saying ‘I’m not going to lift, this is my race,'” Munoz told ABC, later recalling in his post-race press conference, “‘I’m going to keep it flat. If I crash, I crash. I don’t want second; I want to win.'”

When Rossi entered Turn 3 for the final time, with his No. 98 NAPA Honda running on fumes and hope, Munoz was still a straightaway behind him.

Munoz was within 4.5 seconds of Rossi when he saw the American become the 70th different winner of the Indianapolis 500.

And he was still bemused by the fact it happened.

“I don’t know how my teammate did it without stopping. If I’m honest, I want to know what he did. I will look. I am second, why he’s not stopping? He’s supposed to stop. I have to look and see what he did. I don’t know what he did,” Munoz admitted.

“This is the 500, everything can happen. Now we’re second,” he said

The third thing Munoz was sure of Sunday is that won’t be the case in the future.

“One thing is clear, that I will win the 500 one day.”

Don ‘Snake’ Prudhomme pairs with Parnelli Jones’ grandson for Mexican 1000

Photos: Richard Shute/Auto Imagery
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Legendary drag racer Don “Snake” Prudhomme vowed after competing in last year’s National Off-Road Racing Association 1000 off-road race (also known as the NORA 1000 and the Mexican 1000), that it was a one-and-done effort or him. After all, he had just turned 77 and had long sought to check the 1000 off his bucket list.

Well, so much for that idea.

Prudhomme, who turned 78 on April 6, is coming back for more in this year’s NORA 1000 (April 28 through May 2) .

It was during last year’s race, it was in the middle of the night and in the middle of Mexico and I said there’s no way I’ll ever do this again,” Prudhomme told NBC Sports. “Then a few months pass by and you go, ‘Hmmm, if I go back, maybe I’d do it this way.’ Well, I’m going back.”

But Prudhomme isn’t just going back. He’s in it to win it.

I have some unfinished business from last year’s race,” said Prudhomme, who finished 95th out of more than 150 entries — but he completed the entire 1,300-mile circuit. “I made a lot of mistakes, I didn’t know the course, I didn’t know the GPS. I was like a duck out of water there.

But this time, I get it now. I’m not going to say I’ll do any better, but I’m pretty sure I will because I get it and I understand the course.”

MORE: K&N Series’ Jagger Jones, drag racing icon Don ‘Snake’ Prudhomme pair up for Baja race

The drag racing icon spent more than 30 years piloting Top Fuel dragsters and Funny Cars, winning numerous championships and countless races. But he’s a relative newcomer to off-road racing. Last year was only his second-ever race, and it came 50 years after he was unable to make his initial debut in 1968 when the motor on his ride blew up the night before that race was to kick off.

While he said a top-five finish in this year’s 1000 “would be great,” Prudhomme has an even higher goal this year.

It would mean everything to me to win it,” Prudhomme said. “I’ve won in drag racing and I’ve done really good things there, but running off-road, I never have won. It would probably be the greatest achievement I’ve ever accomplished if I could win that thing. That would be over the top – and we stand a shot at it, we really do.”

Prudhomme will be paired with young up-and-coming NASCAR K&N Series driver Jagger Jones, the 16-year-old grandson of iconic racer Parnelli Jones and son of race car driver PJ Jones, whose performance company built the off-road vehicle Prudhomme and Jagger will pilot.

Doing it with Jagger, he’s a young, real aggressive driver and he’s really fast,” Prudhomme said. “I couldn’t think of a better kid to be my co-driver.”

Jagger competed for another team in last year’s NORA 1000, which was his first career off-road race as a competitor. The younger Jones and his brother Jace were leading the race late when the transmission on their vehicle broke, ending their winning hopes.

Jones is looking forward to being paired with Prudhomme.

It’s really cool to be able to do a race with the one and only Snake, who has been such a legend in the drag racing community,” Jones said. “I’m only 16 years old, so I think it’s pretty awesome.

I’ve always been around the off-road scene and watched my dad do a lot of races off-road. I grew up around Robby Gordon and off-road places like Parker (Arizona), where we always go there every year and go camping. I’ve always wanted to do off-road racing. My brother and I both enjoy it. It’s a lot of fun and a lot of different than the pavement stuff. It’s really fun when you’re sideways and stuff.

 

(If we win) I think that would be super awesome. We definitely have a shot at winning. It’s like an endurance race. First, you have to finish to win. That’s probably going to be our biggest goal. We want to do good, but if we can just finish, I think we’ll wind up in a good place. If we finish, anything else is a bonus. To win would be awesome. My dad won last year, so if we could follow that up this year, it’d be super cool.”

Even though Prudhomme said no more after last year’s NORA 1000, he is back for this year’s race. But that will be it, he vows.

This is my last tango in Baja,” Prudhomme said. “But the kid’s got me excited. I ran with him some last year and he’s really fast. He was born to race and fortunately I’ve got him with me and we’re going to have a ball.

But this is my last tango, trust me.”

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