Hamilton fends off Vettel to clinch Canadian GP victory

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Lewis Hamilton stormed to his fifth Canadian Grand Prix victory on Sunday after fending off Sebastian Vettel in a race-long fight at the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve.

Pole-sitter Hamilton lost the lead to Vettel at the start, but perfected a one-stop strategy to defeat the two-stopping Ferrari driver by five seconds.

The result saw Hamilton cut Mercedes teammate Nico Rosberg’s drivers’ championship lead to nine points after the German driver could only finish fifth, fighting back from an off-track excursion at the start.

From third on the grid, Vettel made a rocket getaway to sweep into the lead at the first corner as Hamilton focused on Rosberg in the sister Mercedes. Refusing to give up second position, Hamilton squeezed Rosberg onto the grass, causing the German to drop all the way down to P10 by the end of the first lap.

Vettel managed to forge a one-second lead over Hamilton in the early stages, but the Briton soon found his feet and began to reel the Ferrari driver back in. Further back, Rosberg’s fightback got underway at the expense of Fernando Alonso, but he was not able to close on Hulkenberg in eighth as quickly as he would have liked.

The race was neutralized behind the Virtual Safety Car on lap 10 when Jenson Button suffered an engine failure, forcing him to park his car up at the side of the track. Ferrari took advantage of this to bring Vettel into the pits and switch him to the super-soft tire, meaning he only lost 11 seconds through the pits as opposed to the usual 16. However, the move did commit Vettel to a two-stop strategy, and with Hamilton now in clean air, Mercedes now appeared to be in control the race.

Vettel soon put his super-soft tires to good use, quickly catching the Red Bull pair of Daniel Ricciardo and Max Verstappen. Verstappen was given the call to not hold Ricciardo up, but did enough to keep his teammate at an arm’s length. Vettel was able to ease past them both before Red Bull brought its drivers in, switching them to the soft tire that would last them to the end of the race.

Hamilton was the last driver who started on ultra-soft tires to pit, coming in at the end of lap 24 after seeing his lead over Vettel dwindle to just five seconds. He emerged in clear air in second place, 13 seconds down on Vettel at the front but safe in the knowledge his rival had one more stop to make.

In the race to complete the podium, Ricciardo found himself losing more ground on Verstappen after making the switch to soft tires. The Australian emerged from the pits behind Kimi Raikkonen – who was on an identical strategy to Vettel – and struggled to pass him, allowing Verstappen to escape up the road.

Ferrari had hoped that Vettel would build a gap over Hamilton before making his required second stop, but soon saw his advantage falling. Hamilton was able to produce a set of fastest laps as Vettel’s super-softs began to wear, allowing him to cut the gap to less than 10 seconds. Ferrari eventually admitted defeat, bringing Vettel in at the end of lap 37 for soft tires. The German emerged from the pits six seconds behind Hamilton and with 32 laps to catch him.

Vettel soon began to carve into Hamilton’s lead at the front, reducing it to around six seconds. The two drivers exchanged fastest lap times as the gap swung back and forth as teams began to grow concerned about the life of their soft tires. Red Bull moved both of its drivers onto two-stop strategies, while even Sergio Perez was unable to make his super-softs last to the end as planned. Would Hamilton be able to make his tires last to the end?

Rosberg’s difficult day took another turn for the worse when he suffered a slow puncture on his right-rear tire with 20 laps to go, forcing Mercedes to bring him in for a second time. The German emerged back out in seventh place with soft tires, leaving the race for P3 to Bottas and Verstappen, the latter now running on ultra-soft tires again.

Hamilton and Vettel’s battle had raged on all the while, the gap dropping to just 4.4 seconds. However, a mistake from Vettel on lap 56 saw him run wide at the final chicane, causing the gap to open up to almost six seconds once again with 14 laps to go.

Hamilton was able to manage the gap in the closing stages before crossing the line five seconds clear of Vettel to secure his fifth victory in Canada and the 45th of his F1 career.

Vettel was left to settle for second place after what was arguably Ferrari’s best performance of the season so far, perhaps ruing the decision to commit to a two-stop strategy early on and give up track position to Hamilton. Nevertheless, it was a sign that Ferrari can compete with Mercedes.

Valtteri Bottas did enough to score Williams’ first podium finish of the season, continuing his impressive record at the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve. Verstappen put up a feisty defence in the closing stages to keep a charging Rosberg back, securing P4 for Red Bull. Rosberg had closed on the penultimate lap, only to spin at the final chicane, blowing his chances of getting ahead and leaving his championship lead at just nine points heading to Baku.

Kimi Raikkonen and Daniel Ricciardo were both left disappointed in P6 and P7 respectively, failing to match the pace of their teammates despite running identical strategies. Force India picked up another double-points finish as Nico Hulkenberg and Sergio Perez finished eighth and 10th respectively, the duo split by Toro Rosso’s Carlos Sainz Jr.

Following Button’s retirement, Fernando Alonso was the sole McLaren to finish in P11 despite requesting to retire with a handful of laps to go. Daniil Kvyat followed in P12 for Toro Rosso ahead of the Haas duo of Esteban Gutierrez and Romain Grosjean, both of whom finished two laps down.

Marcus Ericsson had a quiet race en route to 15th for Sauber ahead of Kevin Magnussen and Pascal Wehrlein, while Felipe Nasr and Rio Haryanto were the last classified finishers in P18 and P19 respectively.

Tony Kanaan says his message of IndyCar-NASCAR unity aimed at fans

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Over a 22-year IndyCar career featuring its share of adversity, Tony Kanaan has learned to embrace trying to find the positives in a negative situation.

He believes NASCAR and IndyCar will find a tiny silver lining from the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The series will race together at Indianapolis Motor Speedway’s road course in a July 4 doubleheader, which he believes sends a message of unity he’d like to see from the world during this dark period.

“It’s time to send that message (of unity),” Kanaan told “Happy Hours” hosts Kevin Harvick and Matt Yocum in a Wednesday afternoon interview on SiriusXM’s NASCAR Channel. “If we don’t come out of this situation as better people, globally, in every way, shape or form … it’s just being kind to people. Hopefully, we’ll be sending the right messages, doing radio shows together, doing live on Instagram together, doing races together.

ON NBCSN: IndyCar at virtual Barber Motorsports Park, Saturday, 2:30 p.m.

MORE: Jimmie Johnson wants to run IndyCar-NASCAR doubleheader

“I was bugging Jimmie Johnson to say, ‘Can I be a guest in NASCAR on iRacing?’ I think the misperception, and probably a little our fault as well, is that people don’t know how (IndyCar and NASCAR drivers) respect each and how we think each other’s jobs are so cool.”

It was Kanaan’s comment last week that “it’s not us and them. It is the motorsports world’ that prompted Harvick to ask the 2004 IndyCar champion and 2013 Indianapolis 500 winner about his views on past IndyCar and NASCAR divisions.

Harvick noted that “over the years, IndyCar and NASCAR have that separate stigma as far as the fans, but the racers in the middle, we talk with each other. We’re just racers. I think it’s absolutely great” the doubleheader will happen.

Kanaan said he felt it was the right message to send because of the fans. “For drivers, I don’t think we ever thought of it that way,” he said. “We always respected each other and thought each other’s jobs were cool. That tweet was for our fans who say, ‘Those cars are too fast. Those cars are too slow.’ It’s time for us to stop. It’s a racing family.

“For people who don’t understand about racing, any race car is cool. Doesn’t matter if it’s a go kart, a sprint car, a  Cup car, it doesn’t matter. … The situation, we’re in, we’re all equal. It doesn’t matter how much money you have. We’re all in the same boat now. We can’t do what we love. It just clicked. I said it’s time to send that message. Hopefully this will be the end for ‘you guys and us’ for the fans. For drivers, I don’t think we ever thought of it that way.”

The GMR IndyCar Grand Prix is scheduled to be run July 4 on the IMS road course ahead of the Xfinity race, which will mean that the NTT Series’ Firestone rubber will be on the asphalt before the Goodyears of NASCAR hit the track.

Recalling a NASCAR test many years ago at Nazareth Speedway when he turned laps a second faster because there’d been an IndyCar race the previous day, Harvick asked Kanaan whether the varying tire compounds might present a challenge.

“I don’t there is a solution for that,” Kanaan said. “It’s part of the job, and we need to realize that you guys run different tires. We run softer tires. It’s no different than (IndyCar) racing with the trucks at Texas. It’s probably harder on an oval than a road course.

“But I like it. It’s part of the challenge and makes the race weekend more interesting, the people who can manage that as well.”

Even though he is sidelined, Kanaan still will stay busy this weekend, racing in Saturday’s 2:30 p.m. IndyCar iRacing Challenge event at virtual Barber Motorsports Park on NBCSN. He will be tuning in Sunday at 1 p.m. on Fox and FS1 as NASCAR hits Bristol Motor Speedway.

“Last Sunday I had my alarm set for 12:40 p.m., because at 1 o’clock (NASCAR was) on,” Kanaan said with a laugh. “I told (wife) Lauren, ‘Let’s turn the TV on and watch the NASCAR race!’ I was excited, and it wasn’t even real. She’s like, ‘Man, look at you … I said, ‘That’s what we got.’ It’s been a weird year.”

Harvick also will be racing Sunday, having recently joined Kanaan in installing a new racing simulator at home.

“Let’s do this Kevin: Come do an IndyCar race on iRacing,” Kanaan said. “I’ll do NASCAR. Now that you have a sim. What do you think?”

“Well, I’ll have to go to my 7-year-old to figure out how to drive it fast,” Harvick said.

“He’s been practicing. I’m really good at crashing.”