Photo: Corvette Racing

Milner OK after accident, but ends repeat hopes for No. 64 Corvette

Leave a comment

A challenging race for the Corvette Racing team got a bit worse in the 16th hour at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, when Tommy Milner crashed on the run up to the Dunlop Chicane.

Milner, driving the No. 64 Corvette C7.R he shared with Oliver Gavin and Jordan Taylor, clipped a curb and then lost control of his car in a rare accident. Milner got out of the car under his own power, which was great to see.

“I feel fine. Just lucky to be in this Corvette, we’ve seen some big accidents here over the years and drivers walking away fine. I feel fine, just disappointed. It’s not how we wanted to finish this race. If my Dad were here he’d told me I ran out of talent. We just made some setup changes when I got in the car to go a bit faster to the end of the race. At the end of the day it’s up to me that that kind of stuff doesn’t happen,” Milner told Radio Le Mans.

It has affected the front of the car, which causes a bit of front end damage that will need to be repaired before the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship next round at Watkins Glen on July 3.

Milner was running eighth in the GTE-Pro class anyway and the car never looked like having a realistic shot at repeating its famous class win here last year, Corvette Racing’s eighth at Le Mans.

It also takes away one shot for the team in its quest of both its 100th win as a race program overall, and a shot at a second straight endurance Triple Crown sweep of the Rolex 24 at Daytona, Mobil 1 Twelve Hours of Sebring and 24 Hours of Le Mans.

Milner and Gavin won the first two this year with Marcel Fassler – the Audi factory driver on loan – Stateside, while Taylor comes on board for Le Mans.

Milner got up to fifth at one point and reflected on the race at the halfway mark, via Corvette Racing:

“We’re doing everything that we need to do,” he said. “Maybe I was unlucky getting caught up in traffic in some wrong spots and being near LMP cars that hit each other. Maybe I could have given myself a little more of a gap from them, but it’s hard to slow yourself down. The car is good. We tried a triple stint there, and the car liked that. The tires held in great.

“We’re still figuring out what the car needs. The brakes are good. We just have to keep making laps and keeping it out of the pits. Hopefully as time goes on, some other guys will have issues and we can keep moving up. It’s still pretty busy out there. It seems like there are a lot of LMP2 cars. They’re not awful, but I’m trying to be as nice as I can to them so they’ll be nice to me in return.”

Meanwhile Gavin – ever the statesman – was diplomatically frustrated over BoP during a post-accident interview on FOX Sports, speaking with Andrew Marriott.

“We had some chassis balance problems through the day. Maybe we had a bit too much rear bias,” Gavin said. “I’m just glad he’s out and OK. We can rebuild the car. It shows how fantastically strong the C7.Rs are. Corvette Racing works so hard on the safety. It’s great. But obviously that’s the end of our race.

“[This Le Mans] was… a little bit of a mystery. Test Day, we showed everything. Many other people were not. Much to the protest of a few manufacturers… but obviously after they swept the sand out of their garages, you can see how quickly they go. Tough to compete here. We do still have one car which is fantastic.”

The No. 63 car carries on with Antonio Garcia, Jan Magnussen and Ricky Taylor still running, with eight hours to go.

American Flat Track puts emphasis on fans in building 2020 schedule

American Flat Track
Leave a comment

American Flat Track put an emphasis on fans and feedback from other series while also acknowledging everything is tentative while hammering out its schedule for the 2020 season.

The 18-race schedule over nine weekends will begin July 17-18 at Volusia Speedway Park in Barberville, Florida, about 20 miles from AFT’s headquarters in Daytona Beach, Florida.

The dirt track motorcycle racing series, which is sanctioned by AMA Pro Racing, shares a campus with its sister company, NASCAR, and American Flat Track CEO Michael Lock said the series closely observed how it’s handled races in its return during the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and also built AFT’s procedures from NASCAR’s post-pandemic playbook of more than 30 pages.

SEEKING HISTORY: Shayna Texter wants AFT championship

“I speak personally to the committee within NASCAR that has been put together for the restart, regularly talking to the communications people, general counsel and other relevant operations departments,” Lock told NBCSports.com. “So we’ve derived for Flat Track from NASCAR’s protocols, which I think are entirely consistent with all the other pro sports leagues that are attempting to return.

“Obviously with NASCAR the scale of the business is completely different. There were some times more people involved in the paddock and the race operations for NASCAR than the numbers of people at flat track. Our scale is much smaller, and our venues are generally smaller. So we can get our hands around all of the logistics. I think we’re very confident on that.”

While NASCAR has had just under 1,000 on site for each of its races without fans, Lock said American Flat Track will have between 400 to 500 people, including racers, crews, officials and traveling staff.

But another important difference from NASCAR (which will run at least its first eight races without crowds) is that American Flat Track intends to have fans at its events, though it still is working with public health experts and government officials to determine how many will be allowed and the ways in which they will be positioned (e.g., buffer zones in the grandstands).

Lock said capacity could will be limited to 30-50 percent at some venues.

American Flat Track will suspend its fan track walk, rider autograph sessions for the rest of the season, distribute masks at the gates and also ban paper tickets and cash for concessions and merchandise. Some of the best practices were built with input from a “Safe to Race Task Force” that includes members from various motorcycle racing sanctioning bodies (including Supercross and motocross).

There also will be limitations on corporate hospitality and VIP access and movement.

“I think everything the fans will see will be unusual,” Lock said. “Everything at the moment is unusual. We will roll out processes that are entirely consistent with the social distancing guidelines that will be in place at the time of the event. So we’re planning for a worst-case scenario. And if things are easier or better by the time we go to a venue, it’s a bonus.”

Lock said the restrictions are worth it because (unlike other racing series) AFT must have fans (even a limited number) for financial viability.

“We took a decision fairly early on in this process that it was neither desirable nor economically viable to run events without fans,” Lock said. “I can think of some big sports like NFL or like NASCAR where a huge chunk of that revenue is derived from broadcast, which means that your decision making as to how you run an event, where you can run an event has a different view than a sport like ours, or even like baseball, for example, that needs fans. Because the business model is so different.”

Broadcast coverage is important to American Flat Track, which added seven annual races over the past five years and can draw as many as 15,000 to its biggest events.

Lock said AFT ended the 2019 season with more than 50,000 viewers for each live event, making it the No. 1 property on FansChoice.TV. This year, the series has moved to TrackPass on NBC Sports Gold. “We’re expecting a really strong audience from Day 1, particularly with all this pent-up demand,” Lock said.

NBCSN also will broadcast a one-hour wrap-up of each race (covering heat races and main events).

Because the season is starting three months late, the doubleheader weekends will allow AFT to maintain its schedule length despite losing several venues. And there could be more, Lock said, noting that there still are three TBA tracks.

“There may still be some surprises to come from one venue or another of delay or cancellation,” he said. “But we are intending to run as full a season as possible.”

Here is the American Flat Track schedule for 2020:

July 17-18 (Friday-Saturday): Volusia Speedway Park, Barberville, Florida

July 31-Aug. 1 (Friday-Saturday):  Allen County Fairgrounds, Lima, Ohio

Aug. 28-29 (Friday-Saturday): TBA, Northeast United States

Sept. 5-6 (Saturday-Sunday): Illinois State Fairgrounds, Springfield, Illinois

Sept. 11-12 (Friday-Saturday): Williams Grove Speedway, Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania

Sept. 25-26 (Friday-Saturday): TBA, Texas

Oct. 2-3 (Friday-Saturday): Dixie Speedway, Woodstock, Georgia

Oct. 9-10 (Friday-Saturday): TBA, North Carolina

Oct. 15-16 (Thursday-Friday): AFT season finale, Daytona Beach, Florida