Button left fuming by ‘joke’ radio penalty in Hungary

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Jenson Button was left fuming after being penalized for a radio message during Sunday’s Hungarian Grand Prix in reaction to a brake problem.

New restrictions were introduced to radio communications in Formula 1 in 2016 in a bid to place a greater onus on drivers to manage their own races.

Nico Rosberg was given a 10-second penalty at Silverstone two weeks ago after Mercedes was deemed to have broken the rules, prompting a tweak ahead of the race in Hungary.

Button reported an issue to McLaren on lap five in Hungary, saying that his brake pedal was going all the way to the floor.

Button was told not to shift gear and pit before the issue resolved itself, prompting McLaren to tell him to stay out.

However, the stewards investigated the message and deemed McLaren to have breached the radio rules, resulting in a drive-through penalty for Button.

“So the brake pedal going to the floor isn’t classed as a safety issue?” Button fumed over the radio.

“That’s quite interesting. I think someone needs to read up on what is a safety issue and what isn’t.” Button was the only driver to retire in Hungary, parking up with nine laps remaining.”

Button eventually retired with nine laps remaining after spending all of his race at the back.

“It was boring,” Button told NBCSN after the race.

“Being last and so far back. Then we had a failure with the car. Massive understeer. Car was broken from the start. You’re last and you get a drive through for stopping an incident from happening.”

Although the message was in breach of the regulations, Button said that the rules were a “joke”.

“That’s what the regulations say, but are they correct? I don’t think so,” Button said.

“It’s a joke really. Stopping an incident should be praised, not penalized.

“I understand the regulations in terms of information to drivers. We’re not told how to push, what to save.

“But when it comes to that – a sensor failure – the sport has a long way to go before it is good again.

“F1 needs to realize its mistakes in terms of where the cars are. Next year’s regulations are quite exciting.

“It shouldn’t need the drivers to speak out. It’s common sense that’s missed by the regulations that are being written.”