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Hamilton: Failure to penalize Rosberg for yellow flag lap sends wrong message

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Lewis Hamilton believes that the failure of the FIA stewards to penalize Nico Rosberg for completing part of his Hungary pole position lap under yellow flags sends the wrong message to young drivers.

Hamilton was forced to abandon his final Q3 lap on Saturday after Fernando Alonso’s spin sparked yellow flags.

Despite meeting the tail-end of the yellow flag period, Rosberg managed to complete his lap and go faster than Hamilton to snatch away pole position.

The stewards investigated Rosberg’s lap, but deemed he did slow down sufficiently to respect the yellow flags.

Speaking after winning Sunday’s race in Hungary, Hamilton aired his criticism of the decision, believing it sets a bad precedent.

“Well the stewards needs to come up with some kind of solution,” Hamilton said.

“The whole 23 years of racing, it has been ‘if it’s yellow flag, you slow down’ and if it’s double yellow flag, you be prepared to stop and Nico was doing the same speed at the apex as I was doing on the previous timed lap.

“If there happened to be a car that was spun or a marshal on the track, it would have been pretty hard for him to have slowed down in that case.

“The fact that he didn’t get penalised for it means that we need to be careful because the message we’re sending not only to the drivers here but also to the drivers in the lower categories is that it’s now possible for you to lose only one tenth of a second in a double waved yellow flag section which is one of the most dangerous scenarios with the double yellow flags.

“They need to clear that up because before it was two-tenths that you were meant to lose with one yellow flag and half a second with two yellow flags.

“It wasn’t the case yesterday and there was no penalty, so going into the next race, we could be battling for pole position and we see double yellow flags and we know we only have to do a small lift and lose one tenth of a second and we’ll be fine and go purple in the sector.

“So that’s why it does need to be clarified and I’m sure Charlie [Whiting, FIA race director] and the stewards are going to do so because it needs to be clear.”

Rosberg took full advantage of his right to reply, defending his actions.

“Thank you for making that statement, so now I’m going to put my response,” Rosberg said, patting Hamilton gently on the shoulder.

“What you have to do with a double yellow is significantly reduce your speed and make sure you go safe.

“I went 20 kilometres per hour slower into that corner, 20 kilometres per hour is a different world in an F1 car. 20 kilometres per hour, you are going proper slow. Everything is safe.

“That’s how I did my speed and lifted off 30 meters before my braking point, so I was just rolling there, 20 kilometres per hour slower until I got to the apex. Then of course when you’re in the apex, I would have a much tighter line because I went in slow and then so I could accelerate out again.

“So definitely I significantly reduced my speed and that’s what it says you need to do and that’s why for the stewards that was completely acceptable.It was very very obvious what I did, very clear and of course on a drying track you’re going to get massively faster every lap.

“It’s not like the track was consistent. On a drying track, it’s irrelevant what the sector time was because you’re going to get so much quicker every time you go out there because there’s wet patches and when they dry, you just go so much quicker.

“And so in that segment, I was slower, where there was the yellow flag but of course in the big sector, yeah, I’m quicker because the track is getting quicker and I’m pushing in all the other corners.

“So it was a pretty clear case for the stewards and that’s why I didn’t get any penalty.”

Clear or not, expect this to be cited as an example in future debates over yellow flag periods.

McLaren F1 drivers and senior management agree to pay cuts

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McLaren Formula One drivers Carlos Sainz Jr. and Lando Norris are taking pay cuts, while the team is furloughing other employees as part of protective cost-cutting during the coronavirus pandemic.

With F1 racing suspended, McLaren said both drivers and senior management, including chief executive Zak Brown, all agreed to voluntary pay decreases. No figure was given, but McLaren said the percentage of the cut is the same for all employees who are not furloughed.

McLaren said in an email that “these measures are focused on protecting jobs in the short term to ensure our employees return to full-time work as the economy recovers.”

Sainz Jr. tweeted his support, saying “I fully understand these tough decisions and I have obviously decided to take a pay cut. We are all in this together.”

The first eight races of the 22-race campaign have been called off because of the virus. The season-opening Australian GP and the showpiece Monaco GP have been canceled, while the others might be rescheduled.

There is no date set for when the season might start, with the Canadian GP the next scheduled race on the disrupted calendar on June 14.

The season is scheduled to finish with the Abu Dhabi GP on Nov. 29, but F1 organizers previously said they anticipated that “the season end date will extend beyond our original end date.”

To further save costs and potentially gain time, engine manufacturers and teams are observing a three-week factory shutdown period. It normally would have been two weeks and would have taken place during the midseason summer break.