F1 radio ban lifted ahead of German GP

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The restrictions on radio communications in Formula 1 have been lifted ahead of this weekend’s German Grand Prix following an F1 Strategy Group meeting on Thursday.

New rules were introduced for 2016 banning radio messages that could be deemed to breach article 27.1 of the sporting regulations that states drivers “must drive the car alone and unaided”.

The thinking behind the ban was that drivers would have to manage their races more instead of relying on their engineers.

However, it was brought into question at Silverstone when Nico Rosberg was penalized after Mercedes gave him instructions on how to manage a failing gearbox.

Jenson Button called for a review of the rule after receiving what he called a “joke” penalty last time out in Hungary when McLaren informed him that his brake pedal was not working properly.

In a statement issued on Thursday after the meeting in Geneva, it was confirmed that the ban has been lifted, with the exception of the formation lap.

“At the request of the Teams and Commercial Rights Holder, the FIA has agreed to adopt a more liberal approach to the interpretation of Article 27.1 (that a driver must drive the car “alone and unaided”),” a statement from the FIA reads.

”With the exception of the period between the start of the formation lap and the start of the race, there will be no limitations on messages teams send to their drivers either by radio or pit board.

“This approach is aimed at providing improved content for fans and spectators, as teams will now be required to provide the Commercial Rights Holder with unrestricted access to their radio messages at all times that their cars are out of the garage.”