IndyCar 2016 driver review: Scott Dixon

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MotorSportsTalk continues its look through the Verizon IndyCar Series field driver-by-driver, following on the season finale at Sonoma Raceway.

Defending champion Scott Dixon had an “off year” in 2016 by his illustrious standards, finishing outside the top three in points for the first time since 2005.

Scott Dixon, No. 9 Chip Ganassi Racing Chevrolet

  • 2015: Champion, 3 Wins, 2 Poles, 4 Podiums, 7 Top-5, 12 Top-10, 306 Laps Led, 6.1 Avg. Start, 7.7 Avg. Finish
  • 2016: 6th Place, 2 Wins, 2 Poles, 4 Podiums, 5 Top-5, 11 Top-10, 268 Laps Led, 6.2 Avg. Start, 9.8 Avg. Finish

The biggest breaking news of the 2016 Verizon IndyCar Series wasn’t the Boston cancellation, or the various track extensions, or the silly season rumors. It was that we have definitive proof that Scott Dixon is, in fact, human.

Dixon, the four-time and defending series champion, had a nightmarish year by his illustrious standards. He was sixth in points and won two races. And by the Dixon goal post, that is nowhere near enough to be considered a successful year. This marked the first time since 2005 the Kiwi finished outside the top three in points, and saw him in the rare position of being mathematically eliminated from the championship going into the final race of the year. Funny thing was, he didn’t drive any worse – he just had appalling luck.

Dixon’s year did have its high points. His crew delivered a perfect series of pit stops to secure his first win at Phoenix, and his weekend of domination at Watkins Glen was nothing short of spectacular. And then there was that Le Mans debut, in the Ford GT, promptly setting the fastest race lap. He hadn’t had a weekend like that in some time and that was worth cherishing after the litany of missed opportunities … that you can read below in the following paragraph.

Starting with Long Beach, there was the hard-luck second where he thought Simon Pagenaud should have been penalized for crossing the blend line onto the circuit. There was getting punted on the opening lap in Barber by his Ford GT teammate, Sebastien Bourdais. The anonymous Indianapolis 500, which featured the only highlight of how fast his crew, changed his engine before qualifying. Then a DNF in Detroit one, a suspension break in race two, the mechanical at Road America, the untimely yellow in Toronto, the the collision with Helio Castroneves at Mid-Ohio and the “double birds” issued to Ed Carpenter at Texas.

It was a year defined by frustration for the usually unflappable Dixon and the missed opportunities he endured through, as you see, roughly half the races, was enough to take him out of title contention. Yet the thing was, had it not been for Pagenaud’s control of the points lead all season, Dixon still well could have been in with a shout at sustaining his title.

He’s not won back-to-back titles of his four, which have been spread over 15 years (2003, 2008, 2013, 2015). Next year will mark a turning point for Dixon at Ganassi from a corporate standpoint; he’ll have his first new primary sponsor following Target’s departure. He’ll also have a new engine and aero kit package, with Honda back with Ganassi. But the target will be firmly placed on Pagenaud’s back as Dixon will look to rebound from a rare “off year.”

Formula E announces Portland, Oregon as US race in 2023

Formula E Portland 2023
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The American date for the 2023 Formula E schedule will move from Brooklyn, New York to Portland, Oregon on June 24, 2023, filling the calendar at 16 rounds. This will be the first time in the nine-year history of the series that they have raced on the West Coast in only the third different city in the United States. Miami hosted one Formula E race in 2015. The series has visited the United States every season except 2020 due to the COVID-1+9 pandemic.

The 2023 race will be Round 12.

“We are excited to bring the premier electric motorsport world championship to Portland for the first time in June next year,” said Alberto Longo, Co-Founder & Chief Championship Officer, Formula E in a press release. “There is a big, passionate fanbase for professional sports in the city, together with strong ecological credentials which makes Portland a perfect host for the ABB FIA Formula E World Championship.

“The USA remains an important market for Formula E. We are delighted to maintain that critical presence and engage a new audience in the Pacific Northwest region in all-electric motorsport.”

MORE: McLaren Racing’s Ian James organization’s entry into Formula E

Last year’s American round in Brooklyn was made up of two races with Nick Cassidy from Envision Racing winning Race 1 and António da Costa from DS Techeetah taking the second race.

Portland will host only one Formula E race in 2023.

The 2023 season will be highlighted by the new Gen 3 car, which features a battery capable of generating 350 kilowatts with regeneration capability from both the front and rear axles. This contributes to a top speed of 200 miles per hour (m.p.h.), an increase of about 25 m.p.h. from last year.

The 2023 season also marks the entry of two new iconic teams, Maserati and McLaren, who completed their roster of drivers in late November with the addition of Jake Hughes.

Season 9 Calendar

Round 1:  January 3, Mexico City, Mexico
Rounds 2 & 3: January 27-28, Diriyah, Saudi Arabia
Round 4: February 11, Hyderabad, India*
Round 5: February 6, Cape Town, South Africa*
Round 6: March 8, São Paulo, Brazil*
Rounds 7 & 8: April 22-23, Berlin, Germany
Round 9: May 6, Monaco
Rounds 10 & 11: June 3-4, Jakarta, Indonesia
Round 12: June 24, Portland, Oregon*
Rounds 13 & 14: July 15-16, Rome, Italy
Rounds 15 & 16: July 29-30, London

*subject to final FIA Safety and Technical checks,