Ecclestone suggests ‘a bit of showbiz’ surrounding accidents in F1

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Formula 1 CEO Bernie Ecclestone suggests there should be “a bit of showbiz” surrounding accidents in the sport, as well as saying he would like to build more walls on corners to increase the risk factor for drivers.

Ecclestone, 85, raised the idea when speaking to journalists in Austin, Texas last weekend at the United States Grand Prix.

More and more circuits have ditched gravel traps on the outside of corners in favor of extended tarmac run-off areas.

Despite offering improved safety, the tarmac run-off does encourage drivers to extend the limits of the track more, leading to a possible abuse of the confines of the circuit.

Ecclestone is quoted by Reuters as calling for greater risk in F1, with reference to the improvement in safety standards through the sport’s history.

“In those days, and it can’t happen again, people would come to a race and think somebody could get killed,” Ecclestone said.

“Today they know they come to a race and nobody is going to get killed, which is good.

“I’ve been criticized probably by everybody because I wanted to build 40 cm walls around the corners. They keep saying they mustn’t go off the road; I promise they won’t.”

Ecclestone also said there should be “a bit of showbiz” surrounding accidents in F1 that would leave fans uncertain of the condition of the driver, before referring to Fernando Alonso’s high-speed crash in March’s Australian Grand Prix.

“What Fernando had in Australia… You wouldn’t think he was going to walk away,” Ecclestone said.

“What we ought to do immediately that happens is have big sheets all the way around, bring the ambulance in and take him away.

“He’s gone to the hospital and later you announce that, thank God, he’s out.

“A bit of showbiz. People like that.”

The most recent fatality in F1 was Marussia driver Jules Bianchi, who died nine months after sustaining severe head injuries in the 2014 Japanese Grand Prix when he struck a recovery vehicle in torrential rain.