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With study upcoming, Long Beach F1 vs. Indy political football is back

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A little more than a week after the Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach has been completed, the long-term planning of the event and the political football about whether it should remain a bastion of the Verizon IndyCar Series calendar or be open to a Formula 1 switch is once again back in play.

Per a report from the Long Beach Gazettes, the Long Beach City Council approved a contract for a consultant to study whether IndyCar should stay – as it has since 1984 – or whether its predecessor, Formula 1, could come back. F1 ran at Long Beach from 1976 through 1983.

The council signed a contract worth $150,000 with KPMG Corporate Finance, LLC for the work, and while the contract is for a year, it can be terminated by either side with 30 days’ notice.

This is, of course, not the first time this political football has been tossed around regarding the two open-wheel series, one of which is worldwide and the other is this country’s top form of open-wheel racing.

There’s been previous looks, most recently in 2014, about the viability of F1 returning to Long Beach. But that year saw Long Beach extend the deal with INDYCAR for three years through to 2018, the end of the current contract.

Of course a ton has changed in F1 from a leadership standpoint over that time period. New owners Liberty Media are keen to expand F1’s presence in North America and have talked openly about the possibility of a Los Angeles race, and given Long Beach is established and has the F1 history there, it seems to make sense.

Except that it doesn’t. The cost of bringing F1 back would likely be an astronomical leap for the city, which would need to build proper pit garages, lengthen the track beyond its current 1.968-mile layout and would perhaps need to add further accommodations. A concern that comes along would be that higher ticket prices would likely have an adverse effect on attendance over the three days.

Race chief Jim Michaelian, who has steered this race to its continued success over the years, told the Sports Business Journal’s Adam Stern beyond 2018 it’d very much need to be an either-or situation as there’s no room for both, and that makes sense.

Michaelian told reporters in the Long Beach deadline room he expected the crowd close if not above the 2016 total of 182,420 and a Long Beach Press-Telegram editorial board column on this year’s race confirmed just that, more than 183,000 patrons over the weekend.

The Press-Telegram column also noted this:

“There was something for everyone this year — race car aficionados, music fans, families — in picture-perfect weather.

“The city never looked better than it did on live national television for a record 7 1/2 hours. It was a great way to show off the city’s waterfront, downtown and skyline.

“It’s difficult to put an exact pricetag on what that kind of TV exposure is worth to a city, but it’s a marketeer’s dream.”

Naturally, the editorial ignores that worldwide international TV exposure from an F1 race could well be bigger, but that’s beside the point. For just what was on the 2017 docket, the editorial is spot-on.

Beyond the marquee Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach for IndyCar which was on NBCSN, IMSA also had a national showcase with its BUBBA burger Sports Car Grand Prix airing live on FOX network, and Pirelli World Challenge got a same-day TV race as well on the CBS Sports Network.

A change from IndyCar to F1 wouldn’t just affect the headliner but it also affects the other series that participate on the weekend.

More to the point, it’d affect the fans. With a heavy amount of locals that comprise the 183,000 – some of whom who may not have the same resources to go to an F1 race if it switched – it’d be hard to see attendance in that same ballpark at least at the outset.

Some in the F1 media world think the prospect of Long Beach being back in their court is real, and they may have the connections to think that prospect is legitimate.

It is imperative, though, for INDYCAR to strike a deal to keep Long Beach a part of its calendar. Long Beach remains the gold standard for street course races in this country and for IndyCar, a critical tentpole in its schedule that puts it second to the Indianapolis 500 in terms of importance, history, length, attendance and cache.

This year’s winner James Hinchcliffe was effusive in his Long Beach praise as he drove into victory lane. He knows how much this race means and understood the magnitude of it – the value of Long Beach to him seemed as great if not greater than the overall story line of his comeback from his near-fatal injuries sustained in an accident in practice before the 2015 Indianapolis 500.

If INDYCAR was to lose Long Beach, it’d be a bitter pill to swallow. There’s no immediate event that then steps up to be the lead road or street race on the calendar, because the remaining ones all have their strong selling points, but none is head-and-shoulders above the rest. St. Petersburg or Barber would probably be the leading candidates because of their established date equity at the start of the year while Road America and Watkins Glen are iconic road circuits, but both now only in their second year back on the calendar.

The Press-Telegram editorial closed: “The Grand Prix Association’s contract with the city expires at the end of 2018, but it’s difficult to see how this partnership will not be renewed.

“For 43 years, the Grand Prix Association has provided the city with an outstanding event that continues to grow and showcases the city across the nation.

“It has become the city’s signature event and is no longer just a street car race. It has become an entertainment festival that has taken years to build with people who care about Long Beach.”

So watch this space to see not whether the Grand Prix continues – that seems a near lock – but whether INDYCAR and Long Beach can nail down a critical extension beyond 2018.

Oliver Askew: ‘I was starting to lose confidence’ after ‘hardest hit I’ve had’

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Oliver Askew knew something was medically wrong in the days after concussion-like symptoms began from “the hardest hit I’ve ever had” in the Indianapolis 500. He’d been evaluated and cleared to race after the Aug. 23 crash, but he just didn’t feel right.

The IndyCar rookie told The Associated Press on Thursday he has been experiencing dizziness, sleeping difficulties, irritability, headaches and confusion since he crashed in the Aug. 23 race. He continued to race in four more events as he tried to “play through it” until friends and family encouraged him to seek medical treatment.

He since has been diagnosed with a concussion and is working on a recovery plan with the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center’s sports medicine concussion program, the same place NASCAR star Dale Earnhardt Jr. received care after concussions in 2012 and ’16. Askew will not compete in next weekend’s doubleheader on the road course at Indianapolis, and Arrow McLaren SP will put three-time Indy 500 winner Helio Castroneves in the No. 7 Chevrolet.

“This is all I’ve worked for,” the 23-year-old told AP. “I don’t come from money, and I’ve worked my way up and have finally gotten my shot in a good car. And then all of a sudden, the results just weren’t there in a car I knew should be performing. And I just didn’t feel like myself, you know?

“So initially I felt like I needed to stay in the car and continue to improve. And then I didn’t feel like I could do that with my condition and what was going on. I was starting to lose confidence in myself.”

Earnhardt praised Askew for going to Pittsburgh to see Dr. Micky Collins.

“Oliver is in the best hands when it comes to taking care of this problem and getting back on the racetrack. It was very smart of him to get in front of Micky so that he could understand the seriousness of the situation and begin the process of getting well,” Earnhardt said. “You can absolutely heal from this but not without taking the step of getting help. Often that’s the most difficult step.”

Athletes often hide injuries to continue competing, and even Earnhardt admittedly masked concussions during his driving career. Askew didn’t know what was wrong with him but was frightened to get out of the car.

He is a paid driver who brings no sponsorship money to the team (but did bring a $1 million scholarship for winning last year’s Indy Lights championship), and owner Sam Schmidt holds the option on his contract.

As he tried to race on, his performance suffered. Askew had finished third and sixth at Iowa — the previous two races before Indianapolis. After the crash, he was part of a multicar accident the next week at Gateway and has not finished higher than 14th in the four races since Indy.

A year after winning seven Indy Lights races, Askew has fallen from 12th to 18th in the standings and slipped considerably off the pace. He said he struggled in team debriefs, had difficulty giving feedback and has gone through a personality change that was noticeable to those close to Askew.

Spire Sports + Entertainment, which represents Askew and was among those who pushed the driver to see a doctor, noted Arrow McLaren SP did not reveal that Askew was suffering from a concussion in its Thursday announcement he would miss next week’s race.

“Oliver clearly demonstrated his talent until Lap 91 of the Indianapolis 500, and I hope this does not become another case study of why athletes do not tell their teams they are injured,” said agent Jeff Dickerson. “The reason they do that is because more often times than not they are replaced. In motorsports, there is always somebody to replace you, and whether it was Dale Jr. or Oliver Askew, there is always another driver available.

“I hope this is not a barrier to progress for other drivers — especially young drivers afraid of losing their job — to notify their teams they are hurt. I hope the team proves me wrong because the good news is, the kid has had a head injury for the past month and has still run 14th in IndyCar.”

After finally seeking medical treatment, Askew said he was relieved to learn there was something wrong. He said doctors told him the injury has a “100% recovery rate” and he believes he will be able to race in the IndyCar season finale next month at St. Petersburg. He’s been rehabilitating with exercises and tasks that strain the brain such as deliberately going to grocery stores and the airport.

“Honestly, you know, if I had not gone to see medical professionals I would probably stay in the car,” Askew said. “But now after hearing what’s wrong and that it could get worse, God forbid I have another hit, I know I did the right thing. I think I can be an example for young drivers now in stepping up and saying something is wrong, I need to have this checked out.”