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Valtteri Bottas: No need to talk about team orders with Mercedes

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Valtteri Bottas says there is no reason to talk to Mercedes about the use of team orders in Formula 1 despite being asked on two occasions to move over for teammate Lewis Hamilton at the last race in Bahrain.

Bottas was given the call to let Hamilton through in a bid to keep Mercedes’ win hopes alive in Bahrain, with Ferrari’s Sebastian Vettel charging ahead at the front of the pack.

Hamilton was unable to catch Vettel, but the incident with Bottas did spark conversation about the use of team orders once again, with both Mercedes and Ferrari appearing to have one chief contender for the championship.

Speaking ahead of this weekend’s Russian Grand Prix, Bottas confirmed that he has not spoken to Mercedes about being a number two to Hamilton, and feels there is no need to do so.

“No, we have not the conversation because I don’t think there is any need to. This team has never had number one and number two drivers and is not planning to,” Bottas said.

“It has always tried to give equal chances to both drivers, but what is different for the team this year compared to the last three years is that the gap to the second quickest team has been bigger, so maybe every single detail, letting the drivers race hard or one being stuck behind the others at times, hasn’t cost them anything.

“But I do understand the fact that this year it can cost points if for any reason, like for me in Bahrain, the pace of the other car is not good, then the team needs to think and be clever not to lose any points.

“But we have only had three races this year and I feel that all my good results are on the way, so I’m not thinking about anything like that and I’m sure the team thinks there is no need to.”

Bottas said that while team orders are not something he likes, he would be willing to help out Hamilton as he did in Bahrain if it was clearly for the good of Mercedes.

“If I had some issues in this race for whatever reason or we are on a different strategy and Lewis is stuck behind me or something, if the team tells me to move over I will, because we are doing this as a team and our target is to get maximum points for the team,” Bottas said.

“Of course, as a driver I will do everything I can not to be in that position and make sure I have my own race and personal result as well. But I’ve always been a team player and in the long-term that is going to reward you and the team.

“But in terms of what is going to happen in the future between me and Lewis and team orders and so on, we are not planning anything like that and I’m sure we are going to be racing very hard together on track.

“This year the team needs to be more careful and maybe more clever in terms of how we collect every point possible in the race and on that one I understand. So, there’s not much more to say.”

Tony Kanaan says his message of IndyCar-NASCAR unity aimed at fans

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Over a 22-year IndyCar career featuring its share of adversity, Tony Kanaan has learned to embrace trying to find the positives in a negative situation.

He believes NASCAR and IndyCar will find a tiny silver lining from the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The series will race together at Indianapolis Motor Speedway’s road course in a July 4 doubleheader, which he believes sends a message of unity he’d like to see from the world during this dark period.

“It’s time to send that message (of unity),” Kanaan told “Happy Hours” hosts Kevin Harvick and Matt Yocum in a Wednesday afternoon interview on SiriusXM’s NASCAR Channel. “If we don’t come out of this situation as better people, globally, in every way, shape or form … it’s just being kind to people. Hopefully, we’ll be sending the right messages, doing radio shows together, doing live on Instagram together, doing races together.

ON NBCSN: IndyCar at virtual Barber Motorsports Park, Saturday, 2:30 p.m.

MORE: Jimmie Johnson wants to run IndyCar-NASCAR doubleheader

“I was bugging Jimmie Johnson to say, ‘Can I be a guest in NASCAR on iRacing?’ I think the misperception, and probably a little our fault as well, is that people don’t know how (IndyCar and NASCAR drivers) respect each and how we think each other’s jobs are so cool.”

It was Kanaan’s comment last week that “it’s not us and them. It is the motorsports world’ that prompted Harvick to ask the 2004 IndyCar champion and 2013 Indianapolis 500 winner about his views on past IndyCar and NASCAR divisions.

Harvick noted that “over the years, IndyCar and NASCAR have that separate stigma as far as the fans, but the racers in the middle, we talk with each other. We’re just racers. I think it’s absolutely great” the doubleheader will happen.

Kanaan said he felt it was the right message to send because of the fans. “For drivers, I don’t think we ever thought of it that way,” he said. “We always respected each other and thought each other’s jobs were cool. That tweet was for our fans who say, ‘Those cars are too fast. Those cars are too slow.’ It’s time for us to stop. It’s a racing family.

“For people who don’t understand about racing, any race car is cool. Doesn’t matter if it’s a go kart, a sprint car, a  Cup car, it doesn’t matter. … The situation, we’re in, we’re all equal. It doesn’t matter how much money you have. We’re all in the same boat now. We can’t do what we love. It just clicked. I said it’s time to send that message. Hopefully this will be the end for ‘you guys and us’ for the fans. For drivers, I don’t think we ever thought of it that way.”

The GMR IndyCar Grand Prix is scheduled to be run July 4 on the IMS road course ahead of the Xfinity race, which will mean that the NTT Series’ Firestone rubber will be on the asphalt before the Goodyears of NASCAR hit the track.

Recalling a NASCAR test many years ago at Nazareth Speedway when he turned laps a second faster because there’d been an IndyCar race the previous day, Harvick asked Kanaan whether the varying tire compounds might present a challenge.

“I don’t there is a solution for that,” Kanaan said. “It’s part of the job, and we need to realize that you guys run different tires. We run softer tires. It’s no different than (IndyCar) racing with the trucks at Texas. It’s probably harder on an oval than a road course.

“But I like it. It’s part of the challenge and makes the race weekend more interesting, the people who can manage that as well.”

Even though he is sidelined, Kanaan still will stay busy this weekend, racing in Saturday’s 2:30 p.m. IndyCar iRacing Challenge event at virtual Barber Motorsports Park on NBCSN. He will be tuning in Sunday at 1 p.m. on Fox and FS1 as NASCAR hits Bristol Motor Speedway.

“Last Sunday I had my alarm set for 12:40 p.m., because at 1 o’clock (NASCAR was) on,” Kanaan said with a laugh. “I told (wife) Lauren, ‘Let’s turn the TV on and watch the NASCAR race!’ I was excited, and it wasn’t even real. She’s like, ‘Man, look at you … I said, ‘That’s what we got.’ It’s been a weird year.”

Harvick also will be racing Sunday, having recently joined Kanaan in installing a new racing simulator at home.

“Let’s do this Kevin: Come do an IndyCar race on iRacing,” Kanaan said. “I’ll do NASCAR. Now that you have a sim. What do you think?”

“Well, I’ll have to go to my 7-year-old to figure out how to drive it fast,” Harvick said.

“He’s been practicing. I’m really good at crashing.”