Formula 1 Roundtable: Monaco

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As part of the motorsport trifecta that makes this weekend arguably the biggest of the racing year, things will kick off on Sunday morning with Formula 1’s annual glamour event: the Monaco Grand Prix.

On the streets where high society meets high velocity, there is no better place to be seen than Monaco this weekend – even if Fernand Alonso may disagree following his decision to enter the 101st Indianapolis 500 – both on- and off-track.

Following our first roundtable pieces at the start of the year, MST writers Luke Smith, Tony DiZinno and Kyle Lavinge are back to share their thoughts after the opening five rounds of the 2017 season and preview this weekend’s Monaco Grand Prix.

The Monaco Grand Prix is live on NBC from 7:30am ET on Sunday, with F1 Countdown beginning at 7am ET on NBCSN and the NBC Sports app.

What have you made of the season so far?

Luke Smith: F1 2017 has lived up to all of the pre-season hype and then some. The new cars have been brilliant, delighting fans and spectators as well as posing a significant challenge to the drivers behind the wheel. Sure, overtaking hasn’t been coming as thick and fast, but as I wrote post-China, that’s no bad thing.

The rivalry hotting up between Sebastian Vettel and Lewis Hamilton has the makings of a classic. Ferrari and Mercedes are so evenly matched this year that I expect this title to be decided by fine margins – every race and point counts.

In short: F1 is awesome right now. Let’s relish the season that is unfolding.

Tony DiZinno: It’s been a needed start to the year in 2017. Even if the racing itself hasn’t been scintillating, the drama has – for the first time in five years there seems a proper question over who’s going to win at a given weekend. It’s not a slam dunk, and that’s brilliant.

We’re getting treated to the Sebastian Vettel and Lewis Hamilton bout the sport has so richly deserved, and the new cars are back to looking like badass F1 cars again. Add in the packed battle in the midfield and there’s been more variety than normal this year, which is a good thing.

Kyle Lavigne: The 2017 season has actually been better than I expected. Amongst all the talk about new cars and aerodynamic regulations, concern was high that the racing would suffer.

While overtaking is down a little, the races have all been very compelling and featured a fantastic balance of driver skill and strategy. And, overtaking hasn’t suffered as much as maybe we thought (e.g.: Lewis Hamilton’s outside pass of Sebastian Vettel during the Spanish Grand Prix).

And for Ferrari to be so even matched with Mercedes makes this season a proper fight amongst two giants of Formula 1. Quite simply: this is the best Formula 1 season we’ve had in years.

What is your favorite part of the Monaco Grand Prix?

LS: The pizzazz and show surrounding Monaco speaks for itself, but my favorite part of the weekend is the on-track challenge that is posed to drivers.

The close confines of the street course with the armco barrier waiting to punish any mistakes make this one of the biggest challenges in all of motorsport, just as rookie Lance Stroll found out on Thursday. And believe it or not, what you see on your TV screen makes the the track seem much wider than it actually is!

So that’s why I love Monaco. No, we’re not going to get hundreds (or maybe even tens) of overtakes. But you do get to see drivers pushing to the absolute limit on a track that has no right to host a grand prix. It’s magic.

TDZ: The contrast. The atmosphere between the streets, glitz and glamour of the backdrop of the race versus the intensity of the drivers wheeling between those armco barriers is great.

I’ve also been a big fan of this race’s unpredictability. Sometimes you get a genuine shocker of a result and the race sticks out in your memory afterwards.

KL: Formula 1 cars are pure thoroughbreds…fighter jets on wheels, if you will. Watching cars of that caliber speed through streets as narrow as the ones in Monaco is hair-raising, and those walls are always so close to grabbing you (as Luke mentioned: Lance Stroll learned that the hard way earlier in the weekend).

Overtaking is always a challenge, but that also means the ones we get will be breathtaking. I expect yet another intriguing race of driver skill and strategy.


Who is your pick to win the Monaco Grand Prix?

LS: I’ll go with Sebastian Vettel. Ferrari and Mercedes have been so evenly matched this year that picking between Vettel and Lewis Hamilton is tough. But with hot conditions expected all weekend and Mercedes having struggled to get to grips with the softer tire compounds, I think it will play into Ferrari’s hands.

It would be a key victory for Ferrari as it looks to break a long-running hoodoo in Monaco. The Scuderia has not won in the principality since 2001 when Michael Schumacher stood on the top step of the podium.

As Vettel continues to trace his hero’s footsteps, victory in Monaco would be poignant.

TDZ: If not this year, then when for Sebastian Vettel for Ferrari at Monaco? In the fightback battle where no one has yet won two races in a row in the opening five races – it’s alternated between Vettel (Australia), Hamilton (China), Vettel (Bahrain), Valtteri Bottas (Russia) and Hamilton (Spain) – I’ve got my money on Vettel to bring it home.

KL: Sebastian Vettel was nearly half-a-second quicker than anyone else in FP2. He and Lewis Hamilton seem to be alternating wins this year. Hamilton won the last race, so Vettel is my pick to win this race.

However, this might also best chance for Red Bull Racing to make some noise. Max Verstappen was third in FP1, while Daniel Ricciardo was second in FP2. If not for a strategy blunder, Ricciardo was looking good to win this race last year. It’s difficult to imagine anyone beating Ferrari or Mercedes straight up right now, but this may represent Red Bull’s best shot.

MRTI: Toronto digest

Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography
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Last year’s visit to the streets of Toronto for the Mazda Road to Indy Presented by Cooper Tires proved to be a pivotal point in the championship chase that year.

Kyle Kaiser swept both races in the Indy Lights Presented by Cooper Tires, and doing so gave him firm control over the championship, and he all but clinched it ahead of the season finale at Watkins Glen – Kaiser needed to only start that event to wrap up the title.

And in the Cooper Tires USF2000 Championship Powered by Mazda, while Parker Thompson swept the weekend, Oliver Askew was caught up in a crash in Race 2. Combine that with a second place finish from 2017 title rival Rinus VeeKay – VeeKay also finished third in Race 1 – and it kept the championship within reach of VeeKay, who took it all the way to the finale at The Glen.

The 2018 visit north of the border will likely be remembered for a similar impact on the MRTI championships, both in Indy Lights and USF2000 and, maybe most significantly, in the Pro Mazda Championship Presented by Cooper Tires.

A look at big stories to emerge from a wild weekend on the streets of Toronto is below.

Indy Lights

Santi Urrutia scored a much needed win in Race 2 on the streets of Toronto. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography
  • Santi Urrutia’s championship hopes were teetering entering the weekend – he was 49 points out of the lead and had been vastly overshadowed by title combatants Pato O’Ward and Colton Herta for most of the season. But, his Race 2 victory combined with a second place in Race 1 to close him to within 40 points of O’Ward for the championship lead. He’s still a bit of a long shot, but his chances look much brighter leaving Toronto than they did entering.
  • More significantly, Colton Herta’s title hopes may have taken an enormous hit. After crashing in Race 1 qualifying, just after grabbing the pole as well, Herta suffered a thumb fracture that he aggravated again after crashing during Race 1. It forced the team to recommend Herta essentially sit out Race 2 – he pulled off after running only a couple laps and finished sixth – and he dropped to 18 points behind O’Ward, who won Race 1 and finished second in Race 2. The margin is hardly a commanding one for O’Ward, but with the next stop at the ultra-physical Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course, Herta’s injured hand could remain a factor in the coming races and allow O’Ward to widen the margin.
  • One can’t help but feel bad for Victor Franzoni. Coming off the high of winning his first Indy Lights Race at Road America, Franzoni’s season took a turn for the worse. He crashed in Race 1 and then pulled off in Race 2 in order to conserve finances and resources – Franzoni detailed afterward that the budget is tight for him this year and crash damage from Race 1 does him no good. It would be a genuine shame if Franzoni’s season was derailed by funding issues, as the likeable Brazilian has made great progress all year and has the potential to make it as a Verizon IndyCar Series driver. He just needs the backing to get there.

Pro Mazda

Rinus VeeKay now trails Parker Thompson by only seven points in the Pro Mazda championship. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography
  • No Mazda Road to Indy Championship was shaken up as much as Pro Mazda. Parker Thompson entered the weekend with a sizeable lead of 46 points over Rinus VeeKay. He exits the weekend only seven points ahead after finishes of eighth in both races – he was involved in a crash in Race 1 and made an unscheduled pit stop after thinking he suffered suspension damage in Race 2. Meanwhile, VeeKay dominated the weekend, winning from the pole in both races. It all means that what was once looking like a possible runaway has been all but reset. And we might see a genuine duel between them all the way to the season finale at Portland International Raceway.
  • There are few words to describe the relief everyone felt in seeing Harrison Scott walk away unhurt after his frightening airborne crash in Race 1. This was the first major crash test in a race for the Tatuus PM-18, and it aced it. And big kudos should also be given to the AMR Safety Team, who were already tending to Scott barely a few seconds after his car had come to a rest. Scott did start Race 2, but pulled off with a mechanical problem…which seems minor in comparison to what could have happened in Race 1.
  • Oliver Askew had his best race of the year in Race 2, finishing second to VeeKay for his second podium of the season. It’s been a tough year for Askew and Cape Motorsports after winning last year’s USF2000 title, and getting a podium under their belt could be just what they needed heading into the season’s stretch run.

USF2000

Kyle Kirkwood continued his USF2000 dominance on the streets of Toronto. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography
  • After another weekend sweep, Kyle Kirkwood has one hand on the USF2000 championship. He leads Kaylen Frederick by a staggering 131 points – that’s over four road course races worth of points. He may well leave Mid-Ohio as the USF2000 champion. And even if he doesn’t, it would take something unheard of to keep the championship from his grasp.
  • Kaylen Frederick sits second, only three points up on Igor Fraga. Fraga had his best race since Race 2 on the streets of St. Petersburg, when he finished second, and he nearly outdueled Kirkwood for the win in Race 2. Both he and Frederick have caught fire of late, and their battle for second is very evenly matched.
  • Don’t count out Rasmus Lindh in the battle for second in the championship either. The Swedish driver is seven points behind Frederick and scored his third podium of the year by finishing third in Race 2 at Toronto. Second is well within his reach.

The Mazda Road to Indy is off this weekend before heading to Mid-Ohio, where Indy Lights and USF2000 again have double headers, while Pro Mazda will enjoy a triple header.

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