FIA Formula E

Formula E to stage first zero-emission race in New York

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NEW YORK, NY – Formula E has announced that this weekend’s inaugural New York City ePrix will be the first zero-emission race in the history of the series after joining forces with Enel.

Formula E became the first all-electric single-seater motorsport series back in 2014, and will break more ground this weekend when it stages the first FIA event inside the five boroughs.

Taking place in Red Hook, NY, the double-header race weekend acts as the penultimate round of the season, with the championship showdown taking place in Montreal at the end of the month.

As part of the pre-race festivities, a number of Formula E figures headed to the New York Stock Exchange on Thursday to ring the closing bell and announce that this weekend’s race would be run with zero emissions.

“Enel will entirely offset the emissions of the event in New York through green certificates from its portfolio of renewable energy plants, such as the Enel Green Power Stipa Nayaa 74 MW wind farm in Mexico,” a statement from Formula E reads.

“The wind turbines at Stipa Nayaa prevent the emission of over 133,000 tonnes of CO2 per year, which is the equivalent of taking 26,000 cars off the road.

“The equipment for the race in New York – including all 40 fully-electric Formula E cars, batteries and spare parts – was safely delivered to the USA by DHL leveraging its ocean freight expertise, which produces 100-times less CO2 emissions than transporting the same cargo via air.”

“It was an honor to be invited to join the closing bell ceremony at the New York Stock Exchange,” Formula E CEO Alejandro Agag said.

“With the continued support of Enel, as well as DHL, Formula E isn’t just making history with the first-ever race in New York – but the first zero-emission event in the history of the series.

“Both Enel and DHL share the same common vision and goal to make Formula E carbon neutral by 2020 – the future is electric.”

Reviewing Danica Patrick’s highs and lows at Indianapolis Motor Speedway

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So much of Danica Patrick’s fame can be traced to Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

It’s where she became a household name 13 years ago when she became the first woman to lead the Indianapolis 500 and emerged as a transcendent athlete.

It’s where everything started. This Sunday, it’s where everything will end, too.

In her last warmup before starting the final race of her career, Patrick had a bumpy final practice Friday on Carb Day. She was eighth fastest, but her Dallara-Chevrolet was in the garage most of the session because of an electrical problem in the engine. After returning during the final 10 minutes of the session, Patrick’s No. 13 seemed to be OK.

“At the end of the day, these are things you’re actually glad for, because if this had happened Sunday, we would have been done,” she said. “I’m glad to get the issues out of the way early on. Overall, today felt good. We made some changes when I went out the second time, and I’m feeling good about starting seventh on Sunday.”
Though she has had her share of success – along with a fourth in her debut, there was a third in 2009 and six top 10s in seven starts — Patrick has learned well how to handle frustration at the 2.5-mile track, too.

Fuel mileage might have kept her from winning her debut, a pit collision ruined 2008, and an unstable setup made 2010 a wild ride.

For a review of her up-and-down history at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, and her legacy in racing, watch the video essay above that ran during Friday’s NASCAR America Motorsports Special on NBCSN.