Verstappen’s USGP podium erased by time penalty for cutting track

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Max Verstappen was poised to stand on the podium in Sunday’s United States Grand Prix, but the Red Bull Racing driver was docked five seconds immediately after the checkered flag for gaining an advantage on track to do so.

Courtesy of a 15-spot grid penalty for power unit changes, Verstappen started Sunday’s race only in 16th place, but rose to the top-six within the opening laps, and was into the lead by Lap 21 of the race.

Running fifth into the final six circuits, Verstappen got Mercedes’ Valtteri Bottas for fourth once Bottas lost a spot to Sebastian Vettel in dramatic fashion at Turn 1. Scuderia Ferrari swapped Vettel and Kimi Raikkonen around, which put Raikkonen third and Verstappen fourth in the final stages of the race.

The Dutchman got within DRS range on the final lap and made one final lunge on Raikkonen for third at the carousel complex, Turns 16, 17, and 18, but was deemed to have cut the track by sticking all his wheels and off course, as his incredible pass of Raikkonen for position was erased.

A five-second penalty was assessed for leaving the track and gaining an advantage.

Verstappen thought he’d finished third but was removed in the FIA cooldown room after the fact, promoting Raikkonen back to the final podium position, and making the second time in 12 months (2016 Mexican Grand Prix) Verstappen had lost a podium after the race actually finished.

The Dutchman expressed his displeasure with the decision in an interview with NBCSN pit reporter and insider Will Buxton after the race, and although he didn’t mention him by name, Verstappen called out Race Steward Garry Connelly.

“The whole weekend you can run off track everywhere you want… OK, fine, if it’s like that, then that’s the same for everyone. But then I had a good fight with (Valtteri) Bottas and he runs off track, then comes back on in front of me, and I had to overtake him afterwards, but there’s no penalties given,” he said.

“Then I basically fight with Kimi in the last lap… I went maybe 5-10 centimeters off the track, and I think the crowd was loving it. It was really weird to give me a penalty, and also to get it that quick after a race. At least have a talk in the steward’s room. But it looks so bad on TV to pull someone away from the podium. Again, I had the same last year in Mexico… they clearly don’t learn from it. And for the sport, this is killing it. Everyone was loving it. There’s not a good way to kill the sport, and this is it.”

Verstappen said Connelly “knows” that he’s “one particular steward who makes those decisions against me.”

The 20-year-old called for more consistency in rules adjudication after the race.

“At the end of the day just be clear about it. So if you say, ‘OK, that’s fine,’ we’ll do what we like. If you say, stay within the white lines, then we’ll stay within the white lines. It’s very simple.

“But yeah we need more consistency and at the end of the day let us race. At the end of the day it was 5 centimeters and everyone was loving it. It was a great show. Just be consistent. If it wasn’t allowed, OK, that’s fine, I finished fourth. But don’t say everyone else, you can run off the track anywhere you like, and never give any penalties, then I do it, and you give me a penalty.”

IndyCar: Ed Carpenter Racing signs Ed Jones for road, street course races in 2019

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2017 IndyCar Rookie of the Year Ed Jones has signed on to compete in IndyCar road and street course races in 2019 for Ed Carpenter Racing, the team announced Wednesday.

Jones replaces Jordan King at ECR, whose contract was not renewed for 2019.

“Joining Ed Carpenter Racing and Scuderia Corsa for the 2019 IndyCar Series is a fantastic opportunity to be a part of,” Jones said in a media release.

Jones will also drive a third car for ECR in the 2019 Indianapolis 500, making it 13 races of the 17-race IndyCar schedule that he’s due to compete in.

“Ed Carpenter Racing has shown amazing speed the last few years at the Indianapolis 500,” Jones said. “You can always expect the ECR cars to be at the front. I am really grateful for this chance and will do everything I can to make sure we, as a team, make the most of it.”

In addition, Las Vegas-based Scuderia Corsa will become a partner with ECR on Jones’ No. 20 Chevrolet (as well as the No. 64 Chevy he’ll drive in the Indy 500).

“Both ECR and Scuderia Corsa have been successful in their respective series and I feel the combination of forces will be greatly beneficial,” Jones said. “I’m extremely excited to get underway.”

Jones will yield driving duties in the No. 20 Chevy for four races to team owner Ed Carpenter on oval tracks, while Spencer Pigot returns as the team’s full-time driver in the No. 21 Chevrolet.

“I am very excited to welcome Ed Jones to the ECR family, as well as Scuderia Corsa and Giacomo (Scuderia Corsa co-founder Giacomo Mattioli),” Carpenter said. “I was very surprised when Ed became available at the end of the season. I look forward to working together to get ECR back in Victory Lane.”

The 23-year-old Jones, who hails from Dubai, United Arab Emirates, previously drove for Chip Ganassi Racing in 2018 (finished 13th in the final season standings) and Dale Coyne Racing in 2017 (finished 14th). He won the Indy Lights championship in 2016, as did new teammate Pigot in 2015.

During the 2018 season, Jones had two podium finishes (Long Beach and Belle Isle II) and eight top-10 finishes in the 17-race campaign.

Since forming in 2012, Scuderia Corsa has earned more than 100 wins over numerous racing platforms, primarily sports-car based. However, it made its first foray into IndyCar racing by backing Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing and driver Oriol Servia’s effort in the 2018 Indy 500.

Jones began his new job with ECR immediately, watching new boss Carpenter take part today (Wednesday) in a closed Firestone tire test at Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

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