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Ferrari’s fast F1 start reduced to late-season flop

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MEXICO CITY (AP) Ferrari began the Formula One season with a furious start. A decade removed from its last season championship, the chase with Mercedes was finally on and Sebastian Vettel was taking the fight to Lewis Hamilton.

Then came a crash in Singapore. A spark plug problem in Japan.

By the final laps of Hamilton’s victory at the U.S. Grand Prix last weekend, Vettel was just a red blur in the Mercedes rear view mirror. Again.

And by finishing second in a race it had to win, Ferrari’s season-opening roar has been reduced to a shrug and pouted lips, all but crushed by Hamilton’s second-half surge of checkered flags.

“There was no real secret other than they were quicker than us,” Vettel said. “Whoever is faster usually has a good chance of winning … We tried to fight. At least that was better than other races when we didn’t have a chance.”

Mathematically, Vettel could still win the title for the Italian team if Hamilton has a three-race collapse of epic proportions, starting this weekend at the Mexican Grand Prix. But Hamilton has scored points in every race this season and hasn’t missed a podium since the race in Hungary back on July 30.

If Hamilton finishes fifth or higher in Mexico City, he will claim his 10th win of the season, his third season championship in four years and his fourth overall, matching the four Vettel won with Red Bull from 2010-2013.

Despite Ferrari’s status as Formula One’s richest and most popular team, it hasn’t won a driver’s championship since Kimi Raikkonen in 2007 or a constructor’s title since 2008. This season’s constructor’s title has already gone to Mercedes, clinched last weekend in Texas despite Vettel and Raikkonen finishing 2-3.

AUSTIN, TX – OCTOBER 22: Top three finishers Lewis Hamilton of Great Britain and Mercedes GP, Sebastian Vettel of Germany and Ferrari, Kimi Raikkonen of Finland and Ferrari and James Allison, Technical Director at Mercedes GP celebrate on the podium during the United States Formula One Grand Prix at Circuit of The Americas on October 22, 2017 in Austin, Texas. (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)

Ferrari team principal Maurizio Arrivabene has tried to keep a fighter’s attitude.

“We will continue to fight to the very last corner of the final race,” he said.

This season’s disappointment might hurt more than some previous failures. No one was close to Ferrari in the first two seasons after the hybrid engine change. And this wasn’t the flop of 2016 when Ferrari didn’t win a race after seeing big gains the previous year. This was grabbing the lead by the throat and letting it go.

With a surge in power and technical rules changes the cars, Ferrari began this year believing it had the muscle to trade blows with Mercedes. Vettel landed wins in Australia and Bahrain in the first three races. The high point came on the French Riviera when Vettel captured the jewel of the season by winning the Monaco Grand Prix.

The cracks began in June when Vettel rammed into the back of Hamilton while under a safety during the race in Azerbaijan. The Ferrari then pulled alongside and bumped Hamilton again. The move destroyed any friendly veneer on a rivalry that quickly heated up in Mercedes’ favor.

Vettel’s last win came in Hungary. Hamilton took the season lead for the championship two races later in Italy and then came the Asian collapse that has come to define Ferrari’s season.

In Singapore, Vettel was in pole position and Hamilton started in fifth simply hoping to limit the damage in a race Ferrari was primed to win.

Instead, Vettel undid himself. In a bizarre starting bolt across the track to block Red Bull’s Max Verstappen into the first turn, Vettel instead caused a crash that took out himself, Verstappen and Raikkonen. Hamilton zipped through, won the race and has held the lead in the title chase ever since.

Engine problems had Vettel starting near the back in Malaysia. A brilliant drive to fourth still left him losing more points to winner Hamilton. The crusher came in Japan, when Vettel’s race ended on the first lap because of the spark plug.

AUSTIN, TX – OCTOBER 22: Sergio Marchionne, CEO of FIAT and Chairman of Ferrari talks to the media in the Paddock before the United States Formula One Grand Prix at Circuit of The Americas on October 22, 2017 in Austin, Texas. (Photo by Clive Mason/Getty Images)

“The things that have happened in the last three Asia races have really been a collection of the most unfortunate events,” Ferrari President Sergio Marchionne said.

Marchionne said he doesn’t expect team overhaul ahead of 2018.

“We need to win, that’s the most important thing. I don’t think it’s attributable to a single guy,” Marchionne said.

Vettel trails Hamilton by 66 points heading into Mexico and he knows his rival is poised for another title. Vettel seemed resigned to that likelihood in Texas. He briefly held the lead out of the start, but quickly surrendered it when Hamilton made an easy pass on lap six. Instead of blocking Hamilton to at least take the fight to him, he let him go.

“I was a little surprised Sebastian didn’t defend more,” Hamilton said. “I would have.”

More AP Auto Racing: http://racing.ap.org

IMSA’s Bill Auberlen joins NASCAR America to discuss this weekend’s race at Lime Rock

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Turner Motorsport GTD driver Bill Auberlen joined NBC Sports’ Marty Snyder on NASCAR America Presents the Motorsports Hour Thursday to discuss a variety of topics, including Saturday’s IMSA WeatherTech Sports Car Championship race at Lime Rock Park.

Auberlen, alongside co-driver Robby Foley, enters Lime Rock with a great amount of momentum after finishing on the GTD podium at Watkins Glen and taking the GTD class honors in the most recent IMSA race at Canadian Tire Motorsports Park.

There’s also an extra incentive for the duo to win this weekend as well, as Auberlen is one win away from tying Scott Pruett for the most IMSA victories all-time.

Both drivers will have to be on their A-game this weekend, however, as Auberlen stated that Lime Rock is one of the tougher circuits on the IMSA calendar and compared the 1.5-mile Connecticut road course to a short track.

“It’s what we call the bullring of our season,” Auberlen said. “It is a 54-second lap and we’re going to go around it a million times before the end of the day. It’s going to be a hot one, and I think whoever survives this is going to be on the podium.”

Luckily for the GTD and GTLM teams, with no Protoype and LMP2 entries competing at Lime Rock this weekend, the worry of having to yield to entries from the faster classes is gone.

“These Protoypes are so fast now, that interacting with them, you can’t imagine,” Auberlen said. “We have radars in our car that can alert us when they are coming.

“They get on you so fast that if you’re not always looking or something is not telling you they’re coming, you could have a problem and catch into them. That’s gone. Now it’s going to be focus-forward. You’re going to be focused on everything ahead of you. You got GLTM in there at the same time, but they’re virtually the same speed as us – just a little bit faster.

“It’s going to be nice. When you stand on that podium you might be able to go for an overall victory.”

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