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Conor Daly interested in NASCAR Xfinity Series ride if IndyCar doesn’t pan out

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Another IndyCar driver has mentioned they’d like to give NASCAR a go of it.

James Hinchcliffe mentioned the possibility in 2015 of competing in a Xfinity Series road course race and Marco Andretti has floated the idea a couple of times in the last year.

Now it’s Conor Daly’s turn.

The 26-year-old driver, son of veteran racer and broadcaster Derek Daly, and step-son of Indianapolis Motor Speedway President Doug Boles has 39 IndyCar starts since 2014. He competed full-time the last two seasons with Dale Coyne Racing and A.J. Foyt Racing.

Dale Coyne Racing has the last available seat ahead of the season, which starts March 11 in St. Petersburg, Florida.

On Racer.com’s “Week in IndyCar” podcast, Daly said he had potential sponsorship for that ride fall through around Christmas.

“But as usual when people have money and they get asked to put it up for grabs they disappear,” Daly said. “That’s happened many times before. We’ll try to find the answer to the price tag.”

If no doors open for him in IndyCar, Daly said he has had discussions with Xfinity teams about competing in one of their three road course races. IndyCar visits Mid-Ohio and Road America and raced at Watkins Glen in 2016 and 2017, but is not on the 2018 schedule.

“I’d love to try and do NASCAR stuff,” Daly said. “I’ve been trying to talk to Xfinity Series teams about their road course races. I think that would be very entertaining. I think it would be a great idea.

“I obviously love my IndyCar family, but if there’s no possibilities there and there seems to be some chances to be had in the NASCAR world, then I’m certainly going to take it, because I want to drive anything that I can.”

But Daly, who is appearing in the latest season of “The Amazing Race” with 2016 Indy 500 champion Alexander Rossi, said IndyCar is “my goal.”

“Obviously, it would really hurt to not be in IndyCar,” Daly said. “There’s only one seat left. I don’t know how much time I have to really try and nail it down.”

In the podcast, Daly also mentions the possibility of sports car racing and said he hasn’t yet looked into the possibility of Super Trucks.

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WATCH: Red Bull F1 team completes pit stop in zero gravity

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The Red Bull Racing pit crew may have already made headlines last weekend when it completed the fastest pit stop in Formula One history, changing Max Verstappen’s tires in 1.82 seconds, but the team’s most recent stunt took their skills to new heights – quite literally.

With the help of the Russian Space agency Roscomos, a group of the team’s mechanics completed the world’s first zero-gravity pit stop, on-board a IIyushin II-76K cosmonaut training plane.

Using a 2005 BR1, the team filmed the viral video over the course of a week, enduring seven flights and about 80 parabolas – periods in which the plane climbs 45 degrees before falling again at a ballistic arch of 45 degrees, creating a period of weightlessness for approximately 22 seconds.

With such a short time frame between weightlessness periods, the car and equipment had to be both quickly and safely secured before gravity once again took effect. Each filming lasted roughly 15 seconds, and the stunt was the most physically and technically demanding activity the live demo team had ever undertaken.

“It pushed us harder than I thought it would,” said Red Bull Support Team Mechanic Joe Robinson. “You realize how much you rely on gravity when you don’t have any!

“It challenges you to think and operate in a different way – and that was brilliant. It was a once in a lifetime opportunity and honestly, I could have stayed and done it all month. It was amazing. I think it’s the coolest, most fun thing the Live Demo team has ever done with a show car.”

Though Red Bull was the first team to perform a pit stop in zero gravity, surprisingly Red Bull was not the first team to put a car through zero gravity. In 1999, McLaren driver David Coulthard and his car experienced zero gravity as part of a promotion for then-sponsor West Cigarettes.

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