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Kyle Novak eager to begin new season as IndyCar race director

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It may have come as a surprise to some that Kyle Novak was hired as race director for the Verizon IndyCar Series, replacing the outgoing Brian Barnhart, now the president of Harding Racing.

A fixture in the IMSA paddock with a history as race director for several series under IMSA sanction — such as the Continental Tire SportsCar Challenge and the Porsche GT3 Cup Challenge USA — Novak’s name may have been unfamiliar to those who follow IndyCar.

However, as INDYCAR president of competition and operations Jay Frye explained, the series couldn’t help but circle back to him as they sought a replacement for Barnhart.

“We looked far and wide and did a lot of research, did a lot of different things, and Kyle’s name just continued to come up, so at some point we figured his name has come up enough, so this must be a really good kid,” Frye quipped during a press conference at last weekend’s open test at ISM Raceway.

Though his most recent experience was found with sports cars in IMSA, Novak is very familiar with open wheel racing through previous exploits with CART and the Champ Car World Series.

“My first thrust really into the professional racing side was street course construction, street course design and construction during the Champ Car days,” Novak said of his time working with CART and Champ Car. “So I had the opportunity to build the Cleveland event, Houston, Denver, and consulted on several more design aspects for many more.

“And that’s really what gave me the first knowledge of the operational aspects of what it takes to put race control together, and really the nuts and bolts of what it takes to put these courses together and get them up and running and up and running efficiently, especially.”

Novak also noted that his time with IMSA has in no way negated any open wheel knowledge he accrued. In fact, he emphasized that the two disciplines are more similar than they are different and that the role of race director involves constant communication, no matter the discipline.

“The one thing about running a race, running every session, is the core people and the core roles and the core responsibilities are largely the same,” Novak explained. “I think one of the common misconceptions about being a race director is you’re up there by yourself with one radio, kind of running, pointing and being a dictator up there.

“It’s really just as much about almost a mission control type scenario where you’re managing the room, managing the information flow, just as much as you’re managing the particular sporting aspects of the series.”

He did acknowledge, though, that directing oval races will be a different animal, and that he’ll lean on the team around him to help adjust.

“The ovals will certainly be new to me,” Novak admitted. “I’ve never called a race on an oval before. But we have such a great support and great operational structure here at INDYCAR, and just hundreds of years and thousands of races of experience that will really help me through that transition.”

That core group, which includes Arie Luyendyk and Max Papis, was also instrumental in bringing Novak on board, as Frye detailed.

“There’s a really great group of people in race control that are around a long time, and when this all happened, they were the first people that I called, asking them the best race directors you’ve ever worked with,” Frye added. “They’ve worked with all kinds of different series. Who’s the best ones ever, not just current ones; just give me a list. So we come up with this list. And again, Kyle’s name was on everybody’s list.”

The overall look and process is expected to remain the same under Novak – he’ll be in charge of the event while the panel of race stewards will be in charge of reviewing incidents on track and recommending any penalties – though they will remain open to new ideas and technology that can help officiate events cleanly.

“The bottom line is we officiate just like any other sport. We’re no different,” Novak asserted. “We officiate with the resources we have and what we can see, and we’re always looking at ways to improve that, but I’m pretty sure we have as much covered as we really can at this time.”

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Karam, Daly get IndyCar rides with Carlin for Iowa

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NEWTON, Iowa – Sage Karam returns for the second-straight race and Conor Daly is back for another race with Carlin Racing at this weekend’s Iowa 300 NTT IndyCar Series race at Iowa Speedway.

For Karam, it’s his third start of the 2019 season and his second straight with Carlin. In his five starts at Iowa Speedway dating back to 2010, Karam has never finished outside of the top three, recording four wins (USF2000 – 2010, Indy Pro 2000 – 2011 and 2012, Indy Lights – 2013) and scoring his first NTT IndyCar Series podium in 2015 with a third-place finish.

“I’m really excited to be back again this weekend with Carlin and SmartStop Self Storage for the Iowa 300. Iowa Speedway has always been a good track for me in the past, so I’m really looking forward to getting back to work there,” Karam said. “Coming off of a very productive weekend in Toronto, I’m looking forward to applying everything I’ve learned and continuing to work with the team to get the best results possible. A huge thank you to everyone at Carlin and SmartStop Self Storage for a great opportunity to race at one of my favorite tracks.”

Daly is back in a second Carlin entry. Earlier this year, the popular driver finished 11th for Carlin in the DXC Technology 600 at Texas Motor Speedway on June 8. At Iowa, he will drive the team’s No. 23 Gallagher Chevrolet.

Daly finished 10th in the Indianapolis 500 presented by Gainbridge for Andretti Autosport.

Daly raced at Iowa in 2016 for Dale Coyne Racing (finishing 21st) and in 2017 for A.J. Foyt Racing (finishing 19th).

The combination gives Carlin two more drivers to gather additional feedback on the car. Max Chilton remains the team’s primary driver but announced recently that he will forego all oval races to concentrate on street and road courses.

That created opportunities for Karam and Daly.

“We were very impressed with Sage’s steady progression throughout the Toronto race weekend and his willingness to learn and adapt,” said Carlin Team Principal Trevor Carlin. “The fact that he hadn’t been on a street course since 2015 and was still able to come right out of the gate confident and constantly improving every session was extremely impressive.

“The SmartStop Self Storage Chevrolet looked great out on track and their group has been a pleasure to work with, so we couldn’t be more pleased to have them back this weekend in Iowa. Sage has done really well in Iowa in the past, so hopefully we can use his experience and our past success at Iowa Speedway to come away with a good result for the team and our partners at SmartStop Self Storage.”

The Iowa 300 at Iowa Speedway will take place on Saturday, July 20th at 7:15 pm ET and will be televised on NBCSN.