IndyCar: Bourdais slides by with two laps left to take second straight win at St. Petersburg

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Sebastien Bourdais might want to change his name to Johnny – as in Johnny on The Spot or maybe Johnny Come Lately – with the way Sunday’s IndyCar season-opening Firestone Grand Prix of St. Petersburg played out.

Bourdais bided his time, waited until race leaders Robert Wickens and Alexander Rossi clipped wheels, knocking Wickens out of the race with two laps to go, and Bourdais snuck by, seemingly saying, “See ‘ya later, boys” en route to taking the checkered flag.

It was Bourdais’ second consecutive win at St. Petersburg, his adopted hometown. He lives less than two miles from the 1.88 temporary street course.

Sebastien Bourdais climbed into his race car before Sunday’s race. A couple of hours later, he’d emerge from it as race winner. (Photo: Getty Images)

“This one is emotional because we had to overcome a few bumps, rolls, a ball of fire and a few broken bones to come back in this victory circle,” Bourdais told ABC, referring to his wreck at Indianapolis last May. “I couldn’t be any happier for Dale Coyne Racing with Vasser-Sullivan and the whole Sealmaster (primary sponsor) and everybody on board and all the boys.

“It’s a tiny group but they worked their tails off. We didn’t have the fastest car today, but we had consistency and we just pulled it together to get a podium, which was awesome. I was real happy for Robert (Wickens, who appeared headed for the win) and also heartbroken for him. But for us, it’s just such an overcome, such an upset, I can’t put it into words.”

It was Bourdais’ sixth career win on the IndyCar circuit and his 37th overall in an Indy car, including his prior tenure in the CART and Champ Car World Series leagues.

When asked if there was ever any doubt that he’d not come back from last year’s devastating crash, Bourdais was quick to put that to rest.

“No, not really,” the French native told ABC. “When I got the verdict of what was broken and that it was going to heal pretty well, there was never a question in my mind whether I should continue or stop.”

He added with a smile on his face, “I guess I’m glad did continue.”

After Max Chilton brought out the final caution of the race when he spun on Lap 108 and then stalled his motor, setting up the final restart for a two-lap shootout, Wickens held point ahead of Rossi. But when they made the hard right on Turn 1, Rossi clipped the rear tire of Wickens’ car, sending him hard into the wall and ending his race and chance of winning.

Rossi was able to continue on, but not before being passed by Bourdais and eventual runner-up Graham Rahal, who rallied for a podium finish after starting the race from the back of the 24-driver field.

IndyCar race officials and stewards reviewed the contact between Wickens and Rossi to see if there might be a penalty, but ultimately ruled it was nothing more than race contact between two drivers going for the lead.

Rossi wound up finishing third, James Hinchcliffe was fourth and Ryan Hunter-Reay was fifth.

Scott Dixon was sixth, followed by Josef Newgarden, Ed Jones, Marco Andretti and Will Power.

The rest of the field from 11th through 24th were Tony Kanaan, Takuma Sato, Simon Pagenaud, Gabby Chaves, Spencer Pigot, Zach Veach, Wickens, Max Chilton, Charlie Kimball, Jordan King, Rene Binder, Jack Harvey and Matheus Leist.

RACE NOTES:

* Helio Castroneves was grand marshal of the race and gave the command to start engines while climbing the fence, his hallmark whenever he’d win a race.

* Will Power spun on Turn 2 of the opening lap and backed the car into the wall. He came into the pits on Lap 4 and had both tires and rear wing changed.

* Tony Kanaan went around near the end of Lap 1 and had problems getting it into reverse. He finally did and got going.

* Ryan Hunter-Reay went to pit road after the first lap. His team had to change the ECU (Engine Control Unit) and he was back on track.

* Charlie Kimball stalled in the runoff area in Turn 13 of Lap 3. Also on Lap 3, Zach Veach made contact with someone and lost part of his front wing, but continued on.

* On Lap 7, Graham Rahal dove into Turn 1, made contact with Spencer Pigot, both cars spun. While Rahal continued, Pigot stalled his motor, bringing out a caution flag.

* On Lap 15, Matheus Leist suffered an issue heading into Turn 1 and had to limp his car all the way around the track before getting to the pits, where he replaced all four tires and then his team prepared to replace his transmission.

* On Lap 29, rookie Matheus Leist wrecked at the exit of Turn 3, ending his day. Leist qualified third and gave hope for A.J. Foyt Racing for a good finish in the race. Now, that leaves only teammate Tony Kanaan to carry the torch for the team.

* On Lap 36, Scott Dixon and last year’s Indy 500 winner, Takuma Sato, got together in Turn 1. Dixon brought his car onto pit road for his team to examine it and he went back on-track without any changes.

* On Lap 40, Jack Harvey wrecked in a single-car issue in Turns 13 and 14, bringing out a full-course yellow. At the same time, defending series champion Josef Newgarden suffered a flat tire and got into pit road before the fifth full-course yellow of the race came out (before even the halfway mark). Harvey’s car had to be towed away.

* Race leader Robert Wickens, who has dominated the race up to this point, stops for tires on Lap 61. Alexander Rossi took over the lead, only to pit two laps later on Lap 63. Sebastien Bourdais, last year’s race winner, takes the lead, followed by last-place starter Graham Rahal and pole-sitter Robert Wickens.

* Wickens had an exceptionally quick pit stop on Lap 82 of just over seven seconds. Rossi came in on the following lap, but his stop was about 1.5 seconds longer.

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Meyer Shank Racing wins Petit Le Mans to take final DPi championship in dramatic finale

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Meyer Shank Racing outdueled Wayne Taylor Racing to win the Petit Le Mans and clinch the championship in a thrilling final race for the DPi division.

Tom Blomqvist, who started from the pole position, drove the No. 60 Acura ARX-05 to a 4.369-second victory over Pipo Derani in the No. 31 Action Express Cadillac.

“That was incredible,” Blomqvist told NBC Sports’ Matt Yocum. “I’ve never dug so deep in my life. The adrenaline. I did that for the guys. I was so motivated to win this thing this weekend. But I’ve got to thank everyone on the whole team.”

With co-drivers Oliver Jarvis and Helio Castroneves, Blomqvist helped MSR bookend its season-opening victory in the Rolex 24 at Daytona by winning Saturday’s IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship season finale at Michelin Road Atlanta.

In between those two victories, the No. 60 earned five runner-up finishes to stay in the thick of the championship hunt and trail WTR’s No. 10 Acura by 14 points entering Saturday’s race.

WTR’s Filipe Albuquerque had a lead of more than 10 seconds over Blomqvist with less than 50 minutes remaining in the 10-hour race.

But a Turn 1 crash between the Chip Ganassi Racing Cadillacs brought out a yellow that sent both Acuras into the pits from the top two positions.

Though he entered in second, Blomqvist barely beat Albuquerque out of the pits, and he held the lead for the final 45 minutes.

Blomqvist said he gained the lead because of a shorter fuel fill after he had worked on being efficient in the second-to-last stint.

“The team asked a big job of me with the fuel; I had a big fuel number to hit,” Blomqvist said. “We knew that was probably our only chance. The yellow came at the right time and obviously we had a bit less fuel to fill up, so I was able to jump him and then it was just a matter of going gung-ho and not leaving anything on the line. And obviously, the opposition had to try too hard to make it work. I’m so thankful.”

Albuquerque closed within a few car lengths of Blomqvist with 14 minutes remaining, but he damaged his suspension because of contact with a GT car in Turn 1. The WTR car was forced to retire and finished ninth overall (sixth in DPi).

“I’m simply devastated with the ending,” Albuquerque said in a release. “I really think we were doing a perfect race and unfortunately the last pit stop wasn’t great for our side. Obviously, when you start on pole and up front, you always have a little bit of an advantage. Traffic always benefits the guy leading, and it got me big time there. Passing a GT car and I don’t think he saw me and the level of risk was high. We touched and my car was damaged and it was over for us. It was a bit inglorious to finish like that.”

Said teammate Ricky Taylor, who started third but had to pit on the second lap after a spin in qualifying damaged his tires: “I couldn’t be more proud to be teammates with Filipe. He gives everything and we wouldn’t be in this position in the championship without him. We take risks and I don’t even think what took us out was even a risk. He was fighting for the win and I had no doubt that he was going to pass the 60 car if he had the chance.”

It’s the first prototype championship for Meyer Shank Racing, which also won the 2021 Indy 500 with Castroneves.

“We’ve had in the last four years, three championships for Acura, the Indy 500 win and the Rolex 24, it doesn’t get any better,” team co-owner Mike Shank told NBC Sports’ Kevin Lee.

Said Jarvis in a release: “Full credit to the entire team and for Meyer Shank to come away with victory and the championship, that’s something really special. We won the two that counted most and the championship. This race definitely was not easy and there were moments where I thought this could end badly, but the car really came alive at night. Tom did an amazing job at the end of the race there.”

It’s the third consecutive runner-up finish in the points standings for Wayne Taylor Racing, which won the first Daytona Prototype international championship in 2017. The premier category will be rebranded as the Grand Touring Prototype (GTP) class with the LMDh cars that will establish a bridge to racing in the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

“Congratulations to Mike Shank for winning the drivers’ and teams’ championships,” team owner Wayne Taylor said in a release. “What can I say. We thought we had it, but didn’t. Everybody gave it their all.”

Kamui Kobayashi finished third in the No. 48 Cadillac of Action Express that also includes Jimmie Johnson and Mike Rockenfeller.

The podium showing marked Johnson’s last scheduled race in IMSA’s top prototype division. The seven-time NASCAR Cup Series champion has raced in the No. 48 Ally Cadillac lineup as the Action Express entry has run the Endurance Cup races.

Johnson said a lack of inventory will preclude him having a 2023 ride in the top category. But he still is hopeful of racing the Garage 56 Next Gen Camaro in next year’s 24 Hours of Le Mans and possibly running in a lower class for the Rolex 24 at Daytona.

“I’d love to be at Le Mans next year,” Johnson told NBC Sports’ Dillon Welch after his final stint Saturday. “I’d love to be at the Rolex 24. The series is going through a shake-up with the reconfiguration of the rules and classes, so I don’t have anything locked down yet, but I’m so thankful for this experience with Action. The support Ally has given us, Mr. Hendrick, Chad Knaus, all of Hendrick Motorsports. It’s been a fun two years, and I certainly hope I’m on the grid again next year.”