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IndyCar: Tony Kanaan feeling re-energized, reinvigorated with move to A.J. Foyt Racing

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Tony Kanaan may be 43 now, but he’s acting as if he’s 23.

The veteran IndyCar driver has been re-energized and reinvigorated with his off-season move to A.J. Foyt Racing.

Sure, this is his 21st season in Indy car competition, but Kanaan feels he’s in the right place and the right situation to not only regain some of his luster of old, but also to help turn around a team that has struggled for far too long.

“I’ve driven for a number of big names, including Michael Andretti and Chip Ganassi,” Kanaan told MotorSportsTalk. “Now, to drive for A.J., it’s been a dream come true, to be honest.

“I’m going to be one of the few drivers that can say how many motor racing legends I’ve driven for in my life. With A.J., it’s been a great experience – extremely colorful at times, I should say, because he’s A.J. (he said with a laugh).

“The best way to put it is at this stage of my career, it’s really cool I got to do this. Obviously, there are a lot more things that have to come with it, like being successful and making the team successful, but this is one of those things that I can really say, ‘Man, this is really cool that I got to do it.’”

Kanaan moved to A.J. Foyt Racing after his contract expired with Chip Ganassi Racing, for whom he had raced for the previous four seasons.

It was a tough cut for Ganassi, but he had to trim his four-team organization to just two for 2018. Some observers felt that could be the end of the road for Kanaan, who hasn’t won a race since 2014.

But Foyt threw the veteran driver from Brazil a lifeline, knowing that Kanaan could bring a great deal to the team, particularly since Kanaan has been one of the most consistent drivers in IndyCar over the years.

From 2003 through 2017, Kanaan won one championship (2004), the Indianapolis 500 (2013), finished six times in the top-five, eight other times in the top-10 and has never finished lower than 11th (including last season).

Foyt felt Kanaan still had a lot of tread left on his tires and signed him to a multi-year deal. Not only would it be good for the team to have a former champion as a motivator, he also would serve as a great mentor to young teammate and fellow Brazilian Matheus Leist (photo above), who is 19.

The pair clicked immediately, which could immediately be seen in the season-opening Firestone Grand Prix of St. Petersburg.

Kanaan and Leist were consistently among the top runners in practice and qualifying and showed great promise heading into the race.

Unfortunately, Leist got into an early crash, ending his day (finished 24th), but Kanaan soldiered on to an 11th place finish.

It was the latest chapter in the evolution of A.J. Foyt Racing. The team made a concerted effort in the offseason to not only bring in Kanaan and Leist, but invested a significant amount of capital to not only grow the organization, but to improve equipment and expand behind the scenes personnel.

All for one very big reason.

“The expectations are high, but we have to keep our feet on the ground,” Kanaan said. “As soon as I joined the team, one of the first things I told A.J. is ‘we have to turn this situation around.’

“He wasn’t happy with the results, the team wasn’t doing well, we brought a bunch of new people in, it was a huge change. But huge changes sometimes take times.

“We performed as good as we wanted to do and as we expected in the first race in practice and qualifying at least. Obviously, we can’t predict what’s going to happen in the race, racing is racing, but the expectations are high.”

Kanaan welcomes the challenge to bring the Foyt organization back to prominence. It’s been a long time coming, indeed: the last driver for Foyt to finish in the top 10 was another Brazilian driver, Airton Dare, who ended up ninth in 2002.

“For this year, my goal is to get a couple podium finishes, maybe a race win, but if we finish in the top eight in the championship, that’ll be a huge improvement from last year,” Kanaan said.

By comparison, Foyt’s two drivers in 2017 struggled. Carlos Munoz finished 16th in the final standings, while Conor Daly was 18th.

But Kanaan is also realistic. He knows he and Leist aren’t going to turn things around overnight.

“You can’t expect in IndyCar, with all the good teams and good drivers, you can’t say we’re going to come in and dominate in one year,” Kanaan said. “It’s going to take time.

“But as long as we’re moving forward and keep improving, that’s what A.J. wants and that’s what we need to do.”

His overall performance at St. Petersburg has Kanaan especially looking forward to the next two races.

In five career starts at ISM Raceway in suburban Phoenix, Kanaan has two wins (2003 and 2004), three podiums and one pole, along with an outstanding average finish of 3.0 (he’s never finished lower than sixth, which came in last year’s race).

“Phoenix is a race that I’ve done well at so many times,” Kanaan said. “We had a great test in February, so I’m expecting a lot of good things coming out there.”

His record at Long Beach hasn’t been as successful, with just one podium finish (third in 2009). But in nine overall starts on the popular street course, Kanaan – who finished 15th there last year, one lap down – has four top-fives and two other top-10s.

“Long Beach is always a fun place to go, a beautiful place to race, it’s a race that is extremely popular,” Kanaan said. “It’s the beginning of the championship that you want to start off on the right foot, so I’m expecting big things and good results at both races.

“We already had a pretty strong first race weekend, so we’re going to try and keep the momentum going.”

Kanaan is also quick to point out that he’s looking forward to spending several more seasons in IndyCar with Foyt because of the momentum the series has right now.

“You see how many more new teams we have, how many more new sponsors and our new TV package (with NBC from 2019-2021) is great for the future now,” Kanaan said. “We’ve survived and IndyCar is on the upswing, big-time, for sure. That’s what I see.”

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Dean Wilson’s life as a privateer reconnects the rider to his roots

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One of the added benefits of subscribing to NBC Sports Gold is the in-depth interviews from each Saturday’s action. Last week between the first and second rounds of qualification for the Glendale Supercross race, a relaxed and confident Dean Wilson joined Race Day Live’s Daniel Blair and Jim Holley to review his fourth-place finish in the season opener and his mindset moving forward.

Losing factory support from Rockstar / Husqvarna at the end of 2018 was not exactly what Wilson had in mind, but after getting off to a great start in the first two races this season, it may well have been a blessing in disguise.

The life of a privateer is not exactly relaxed, but it affords a rider the opportunity to call his own shots. For Wilson, it is also a way to reconnect with the grassroots feel that attracted him to Supercross in the first place.

“I think that’s what I like,” Wilson said on Race Day Live. “I think that’s the environment and atmosphere I like – it’s just more low key. At Anaheim I, you would think I was local racing at Glen Helen. I had a Sprinter and I had another trailer just to chill in, do my spins. It was so cold I had a little propane heater to warm me up. But I like that. That’s what works for me.”

MORE: Dean Wilson’s Cinderella story at Anaheim 

The program Wilson was able to put together during the offseason produced back-to back top 10s – a much better start to the 2019 season than he experienced last year.

In 2018, Wilson did not score a top 10 until his fourth feature at San Diego. His first top five would not come until late March in Indianapolis.

This year Wilson got the hole shot and led 14 laps at Anaheim in the opener before finishing fourth. Last week in Glendale, he finished eighth.

“What was going through my head was ‘it’s about time; it’s about five years too late to lead some laps here,’ ” Wilson described his emotion as he led at Anaheim. “It was nice because I did a lot of work in the off-season and my starts were really good. The thing is I haven’t over-analyzed my starts and practice.”

At Anaheim I, Wilson struggled with visibility as his goggles began to get fouled by mud. A once comfortable lead was eroded by Justin Barcia. With pressure from behind, Wilson made a minor mistake that was then compounded by lapped traffic.

“I was leading my laps; I was just trying to hit my marks. I was doing really well until I made a couple of mistakes. I couldn’t hit that middle double, double … the rut was getting real chewed out, but I was already on the right side where you couldn’t double the middle part so you had to go roll, roll, roll – and Barcia was already on me.”

Wilson’s pair of top 10s was enough to keep him fifth in the standings, three points behind Glendale’s winner Blake Baggett.

For more, watch the video above.

Next Race: Anaheim II Jan. 19, 11 p.m., NBCSN

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