Mario Andretti: Last IndyCar win 25 years ago at Phoenix ‘seems like it was only yesterday’

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The Valvoline 200 on April 4, 1993 marked the 52nd and final win of Mario Andretti’s illustrious IndyCar career.

It came at a track – Phoenix International Raceway (now ISM Raceway) – that was one of the most significant tracks in Andretti’s life.

It was in 1964, when the Italian-born driver first embarked upon an IndyCar career, that Andretti began a love affair with the one-mile oval that continues to this day.

Mario Andretti celebrates his last IndyCar win at Phoenix in 1993. (Photo: Dan R. Boyd/INDYCAR)

And now, in fitting fashion, the legendary Andretti will be honored today and throughout the weekend at ISM Raceway, paying tribute to his career and his final win there 25 years and one day ago.

That final win is something that has stuck with him throughout the years. And tonight, he’ll help the track kick off the race weekend with a dinner in his honor, paying tribute to all he did not only for racing in general, but for ISM Raceway in particular.

It will be a start to three days of memories of Andretti’s career, including a display of the four Indy cars he won races in at the former PIR.

More importantly, Andretti will be feted by a number of peers he raced against in that memorable race in 1993, including such luminaries as Emerson Fittipaldi, who is traveling from his native Brazil to attend, as well as Paul Tracy, Bobby Rahal, Al Unser Jr., David Kudrave, Lyn St. James, Jimmy Vasser, Arie Luyendyk and Mario’s son, Michael.

“(ISM has) been running a number of interviews of all these greats on Twitter and man, they’re all kind to me, I don’t know why,” Andretti said to MotorSportsTalk with a chuckle. “But they’re really nice, which is so neat. Our racing family is relatively small and very tight, but there’s so many things you just don’t expect.

“I have a very special appreciation for that. I don’t know how I can ever repay that. That’s the part that has the biggest value, just to hear these guys reminisce and talk about it. They’re too nice. Next time I’m going to have to buy them a beer (he said with a laugh).”

Mario Andretti makes a pit stop in what would be the final win of his IndyCar career, April 4, 1993, at Phoenix International Raceway (Photo: Getty Images)

When asked how much he remembers his last win, Andretti continues with another laugh.

“One day it seems like it was 100 years ago, the next day it seems like it was only yesterday. It all depends on which side of the bed I get up on,” he quipped.

But drawing serious, Andretti added, “It’s a great reminder and I’m totally flattered that they’re using this to promote the race.”

When Andretti came to the world of Indy car racing in 1964, little did he know how much Phoenix and PIR would play in his development as a race car driver.

“Phoenix meant so much to me throughout my career,” Andretti said. “I was part of the Firestone group and the development of the (Indy car) tires back in the 60’s when I graduated to IndyCar.

“Phoenix as a venue was golden for a lot of testing during the winter and a lot of it, believe it or not, was related to Indianapolis tires, as well. We did all the construction work at Phoenix which was pertinent to Indy, and Indy was just compounds.

“The bottom line is I spent a lot of time there and the team I joined as a rookie in IndyCar in 1964 was based there in Phoenix. So, that was my second home and I probably have 100,000 miles on that track.

“Each test was thousands and thousands of miles. To have the track showcasing or reminding me and giving me this kind of platform, I think it’s awesome. … They’re going all-out and I’m totally flattered. I can’t wait for it to happen. I’m just totally elated and proud.”

Three generations of Andretti familly racers: Mario, grandson Marco and Mario’s son Michael. (Getty Images)

In just a few years, NASCAR and Darlington Raceway turned their annual Throwback Weekend into one of the more popular race weekends on the schedule.

Andretti would like to see other tracks on the IndyCar circuit do something similar, honoring other great drivers that had unique ties to those facilities.

“Yes, why not? Why not show the appreciation from where we came from in the series,” he said. “It seems like IndyCar lost some ground when there was a split (with CART after the 1995 season), but we need to remind our fans that we’re the oldest racing series (Indy car racing) in the world. We’re older than Formula One and NASCAR, and never forget that.

“We have a rich, rich history to be proud of. When you look at our race records, they go back into the ‘20s when race records were first to be followed and saved, like when we go for all-time wins and things like that.

“That’s all meaningful and many of the champions of relatively recent decades that accomplished so much are still around, like me, to enjoy the moment. Why not showcase that and show the fans that there’s lots of history and the young lads of today, that’s what they’re trying to measure up to.

“When they start compiling wins, they’re looking at those overall records. They have a lot of life and it didn’t just start 10 years ago, it started a century ago. So yeah, I think all that is very important. We’re proud of all that and we definitely should showcase it. I would encourage that, for sure.”

Everybody loves Mario, including Lady GaGa. Photo: Getty Images.

All those days and weeks of tire testing set Andretti on a course that led to one of the most successful records any individual driver has compiled:

* Four Indy car championships (two in USAC, two in CART)

* A win in the Daytona 500

* A win in the 12 Hours of Sebring

* Became only the second American to win an F1 championship – and the last one to turn the feat – in 1978.

* Became the oldest driver to win an IndyCar race, a mark that still stands. The place? Phoenix 1993, when Andretti was 53 years old. He also became the first driver in Indy car history to win races in each of four decades (1960s through 1990s).

Now 78, Andretti continues to race around tracks from Pocono to Sonoma in a specially-built two-seat Indy car, giving exhibition rides to fans and celebrities in his role as an official ambassador for the Verizon IndyCar Series.

But don’t think for a minute that Andretti wouldn’t love to turn back time and compete in Saturday night’s Desert Diamond West Valley Casino Phoenix Grand Prix at ISM Raceway.

“If my son was crazy enough to give me a ride, I’d probably be in it Saturday,” he joked on a national teleconference on Wednesday. “But I’ll have to do with that two-seater, which I’m enjoying very much by the way. Quite satisfied with that.”

Vasser, who finished third to Andretti in that memorable 1993 race at PIR was literally just beginning his IndyCar career (started in 1992) as Andretti was closing in on the end of his own career (he’d retire at the end of the 1994 seas

Vasser recalls what it was like to not only race a living legend, but also just to hang out with one of the sport’s most popular drivers ever.

“Wow. I mean, we don’t have enough time to talk about all the things,” Vasser said on Wednesday’s teleconference. “Everybody looks up to Mario. The biggest thing, he’s the king of cool, like Steve McQueen or something for me.”

Unser Jr. told The Arizona Republic recently what Andretti meant to both him and the sport, back in the day as well as today.

“When Mario walks into a room, his aura walks in first,” Unser Jr. told the Republic.

Unser Jr. is back in the IndyCar world as a consultant to Harding Racing, making its first full-time foray into the sport this season. He saw first-hand less than a month ago in the season-opening race weekend at St. Petersburg, Florida, just how beloved Andretti still is to fans.

“I was walking through the crowd, and all of the sudden I hear this big roar and cheer,” Unser Jr. said. “And who goes by me on a scooter? It’s Mario.”

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Andretti’s final win in 1993 was prototypical of his entire career: never give up, try to get yourself in contention and be ready to quickly jump at an opportunity as soon as it arises.

During Wednesday’s teleconference, Andretti recalled how he came to win his last IndyCar race in the No. 6 Newman Haas Racing Kmart/Texaco Havoline Lola Ford.

“Well, I recall it was a little bit of a nice little gift to some degree because I was probably at that point (late in the race) running third,” he said. “I started on pole in that race, I think (actually, he started second).

Mario Andretti heads to the checkered flag in the 1993 Valvoline 200 at Phoenix International Raceway, the final win of his legendary open-wheel career. Photo: INDYCAR/Dan R. Boyd

“I led at the beginning a little bit (first 10 laps), but then the Penske cars seemed to be on a planet of their own. They were running 1-2.

“First Paul Tracy crashed (on Lap 161 of 200, after leading 151 laps, and had a two-lap lead at the time of the crash), which was unusual, out of the lead.

“Then 10 laps later (Lap 171, after leading the prior 10 laps), Emerson Fittipaldi did the same thing.

“All of a sudden here I’m leading the race. I figure how sweet this is. I saw both guys walk away. That was it.

“But it was certainly welcomed, as you can imagine.”

All told at PIR, Andretti compiled an outstanding record over 30 years:

* Four wins (1966, 1967, 1988 and 1993), tying him for third all-time in PIR/ISM annals

* In 42 starts on the one-mile oval, earned 22 top fives (most all-time) and 30 top 10s (also most all-time)

* Eight poles (second-most all-time)

“Fond memories there,” Andretti said. “Been on the podium (in 1988) with my own son, Michael. Started on the front row together as well (1986 and 1987).

“When I look back, it just brings back very, very special memories.”

Here’s a video of that milestone race in 1993:

NOTE: Tune in to tonight’s special post-dinner tribute to Mario Andretti, who will be joined by several of his former competitors, at 10:30 p.m. ET on IndyCar.com.

Follow @JerryBonkowski

Jimmie Johnson won’t race full time in 2023; leaves open possibility of returning at Ganassi

Jimmie Johnson race 2023
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Though he remains uncertain of his plans for next year, Jimmie Johnson won’t race full time in 2023, scaling back his schedule after running a full 17-race NTT IndyCar Series season.

“This was a difficult choice for me, but in my heart, I know it’s the right one,” Johnson said in a statement Monday morning. “I’m not exactly sure what the next chapter holds, but if an opportunity comes along that makes sense, I will consider it. I still have a bucket list of racing events I would like to take part in. Competing at this level in IndyCar has been such a great experience.

“I couldn’t have asked for a better team to race for than Chip Ganassi and Chip Ganassi Racing. Everyone worked extremely hard for the last two seasons, pushing to get the best performances out of me every single week. The support from my crew and teammates Dario (Franchitti), Scott (Dixon), Tony (Kanaan), Marcus (Ericsson) and Alex (Palou) went above and beyond anything I could have ever asked for.”

WHAT’S NEXT FOR JIMMIE JOHNSON: An analysis of his racing options for the 2023 season

Driving the No. 48 Dallara-Honda for Chip Ganassi Racing, Johnson ranked 21st in the 2022 points standings with a career-best fifth place July 24 at Iowa Speedway.

After running only road and street courses for Ganassi in 2021, the seven-time NASCAR Cup Series champion added ovals this year. In his Indy 500 debut, he qualified 12th and finished 28th after a late crash.

“I do have a desire to go back (to IndyCar), it’s just at this point, I know what’s required to do a full schedule, and I don’t have that in me,” Johnson told AP. “I don’t have that passion that I need for myself to commit myself to a full season.”

That leaves open the concept of Johnson returning part time with Ganassi, perhaps exclusively on ovals.

“We are fully supportive of Jimmie,” team owner Chip Ganassi said in a statement. “He has been a valued member of our team and if we can find a way to continue working together, we would like to do so.”

During IndyCar’s season finale race weekend, Johnson told reporters Sept. 9 that he planned to explore his options with wife Chandra and daughters Evie and Lydia. Johnson told the Associated Press that his family is considering living abroad for a year or two, and he has toyed with the idea of running in the World Endurance Championship sports car series because of its international locales.

Johnson hasn’t ruled out IndyCar, IMSA sports cars or even a cameo in NASCAR next year. Since retiring from full-time NASCAR after the 2020 season, he has entered the endurance races of the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship in the No. 48 Ally Cadillac (including Saturday’s Petit Le Mans season finale). Johnson also wants to race in the 24 Hours of Le Mans and is a prime candidate for the Garage 56 entry (a joint project of NASCAR and Hendrick Motorsports).

Johnson told the AP he is interested in becoming the latest driver to try “The Double” and run both the Coca-Cola 600 and Indy 500 on the same day (the most recent was Kurt Busch in 2014).

“You know me and endurance sports, and ‘The Double’ sounds awesome,” Johnson, a four-time Coke 600 winner, told AP. “I’ve always had this respect for the guys who have done ‘The Double.’ I would say it is more of a respect thing than a bucket-list item, and I’d love to put some energy into that idea and see if I can pull it off.”

It is less likely that he would return to IMSA’s endurance events because its top prototype series is being overhauled, limiting the amount of inventory available for the new LMDh cars in the rebranded GTP division.

Johnson has confirmed that he would retain primary sponsor Carvana, which has backed him in IndyCar the past two years. He revealed his decision Monday during the last episode of “Reinventing the Wheel,” Carvana Racing’s eight-part docuseries about his 2023 season.

“I’m thankful for the partnership with a company like Carvana for allowing me to take this journey in IndyCar, for seeing the value in our partnership and being open to future opportunities together,” Johnson said. “They have truly showed me that there are no finish lines in life. Along with Carvana, The American Legion, Ally, cbdMD and Frank August were there every step of the way, and I couldn’t have done it without all of them. Most importantly — and the true rockstars in all of this –my family, Chani, Evie and Lydia. They have always allowed me to chase my dreams, and we are all just really excited about what the future holds for all of us. I have enjoyed every minute of these last two years.”

Said Carvana co-founder Ryan Keeton: “During the past two years, Jimmie Johnson has been so amazing to collaborate with. Our team admires his passion, hard work and commitment to continuous improvement while also having fun, and we look forward to continuing to support him next year in this new chapter.”