Column: Sebastien Bourdais proves he is still among the best in world

Photo: IndyCar/Joe Skibinski
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Sebastien Bourdais was once considered among the best drivers in the world.

In case you forgot, refer to the breathtaking pass he made Sunday on the streets of Long Beach to move into second place that will make every highlight reel this season. OK, so IndyCar ruled the pass illegal and made Bourdais return the position to Scott Dixon. No biggie. The Frenchman simply passed Dixon again.

Need a favorite IndyCar driver to root for? Bourdais could be the one for you.

He made his case for fan support at Long Beach, where Bourdais was the star of the race despite his 13th-place finish.

Bourdais started ninth and twice drove his way to second before his race fell apart. That’s when the Bourdais full of fire and fury returned. His post-race assessment was brutal and Bourdais made clear he was irked with IndyCar, annoyed with rookie drivers and even angry at some veterans.

Cast him as a hero for his on-track skill and he will nail the part. If you make him mad, though, he plays a perfect villain, too. No matter the part, what Bourdais can do in a race car and the kind of competitor he is have made it clear that he’s still among the very elite at his craft.

Bourdais was untouchable during his first stint racing in the United States from 2003 to 2007, when he reeled off four consecutive Champ Car titles in five seasons. He won 31 of 73 races – scoring 44 podiums and 31 poles in that span -then landed the promotion of his life with a call to Formula One.

His dream job didn’t have a happy ending: Bourdais was out of F1 after just two seasons.

It took him another two years to return to the U.S., but the only jobs available were lousy IndyCar Series rides. Driving inferior equipment for small teams, Bourdais hardly resembled the guy who couldn’t be caught in those halcyon early days of his career.

Here’s the thing about race car drivers – most believe that with the right resources, they can fix a race team.

Bourdais can actually deliver.

After 39 frustrating races over three seasons, former champion Jimmy Vasser gave Bourdais a second shot in second-tier KV Racing. Bourdais needed 13 races to take the team to the winner’s circle. He won twice more in 2015, and once again the next season. Then KV shut down and Bourdais had to return to Dale Coyne Racing.

He had done enough to return to quality sports car rides for the endurance events, and he was part of Action Express’ winning teams at the Rolex 24 of Daytona, the 12 Hours of Sebring and the Petit Le Mans at Road Atlanta. He got a shot with Chip Ganassi Racing’s new GT Le Mans organization and won Daytona again, then got a class victory at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in his hometown.

Believing he could turn the Coyne IndyCar operation into a winner, Bourdais did so with a victory in the 2017 season opener on the streets of St. Petersburg, Florida, the city Bourdais now calls home. He finished second a race later at Long Beach and it really did look like Bourdais was the difference maker.

Then he crashed during qualifying for last year’s Indianapolis 500. Bourdais broke his pelvis, his hip and doctors said he wouldn’t race again last season. He laughed and busied himself rehabilitating at such a pace that he was back in the car for the final three IndyCar races of the year.

The winter saw an opportunity for Bourdais to reunite with Vasser and James Sullivan from KV in a partnership with Coyne, and there was Bourdais in the season opener at St. Pete, defending his victory in a tearful pronouncement that the 39-year-old IndyCar driver is as sharp as he was 15 years ago in Champ Car.

Bourdais’ comeback tour this season continued with a pole-winning run on the oval at Phoenix, then his show-stopping maneuvers at Long Beach. On paper, Dale Coyne Racing is not supposed to challenge the Andretti, Ganassi and Penske teams for wins. With Bourdais behind the wheel, anything is possible.

 

Final 2023 Rolex 24 at Daytona results, stats

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DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — The 2023 Rolex 24 at Daytona overall results were all streaks: two consecutive victories in the endurance classic for Meyer Shank Racing and three in a row for Acura.

And Helio Castroneves became the second driver to win three consecutive Rolex 24s and the first to win in three straight years (Peter Gregg won in 1973, ’75 and ’76; the race wasn’t held in ’74 because of a global oil crisis).

Starting from the pole position, Tom Blomqvist took the checkered flag in the No. 60 ARX-06 that led a race-high 365 of 783 laps with co-drivers Castroneves, Simon Pagenaud and Colin Braun.

RESULTS: Click here for the finishing order in the 61st Rolex 24 at Daytona l By class

Meyer Shank Racing now has two Rolex 24 victories and the 2022 championship since entering the premier prototype category of the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship in 2021.

“I think what’s so special about this team is we are a small team compared to some of our opponents, but the atmosphere, the way we work, enables people to get the best out of themselves, and I think that’s why we’re such high achievers,” Blomqvist said. “I think there’s no egos. It’s a very open book, and that just enables each and every one of us to reach our potential. I think that’s why we’ve achieved so much success in really a short time at this level of competition.”

It’s the 16th IMSA victory for MSR.

The 61st running of the Rolex 24 at Daytona marked the debut of the Grand Touring Prototype category that brought hybrid engine technology to IMSA’s top level.

In other categories:

LMP2: James Allen passed Ben Hanley on the final lap and delivered a victory in the No. 55 ORECA by 0.016 seconds. It’s the second IMSA victory for Proton Competition, which last won at Sebring in 2012. It was the first Rolex 24 victory for Allen and co-drivers Gianmaria Bruni, Fred Poordad and Francesco Pizzi.

GTD Pro: Cooper MacNeil won in the last start of his IMSA career as the No. 79 Mercedes-AMG GT3 scored the first Rolex 24 at Daytona for WeatherTech Racing and the team’s fourth career victory.

MacNeil, who co-drove with Maro Engel, Jules Gounon and Daniel Juncadella, earned his 12th career victory and first at the Rolex 24.

“Winning by last IMSA race is tremendous,” MacNeil said.

GTD: The No. 27 Heart of Racing Team delivered the first Rolex 24 at Daytona for Aston Martin, which has been competing in endurance races at Daytona International Speedway since 1964. Drivers Marco Sorensen, Roman De Angelis, Darren Turner and Ian James (also the team principal) earned the victory in the English brand’s 13th attempt.

It’s also the first Rolex 24 at Daytona win for Heart of Racing, which has seven IMSA wins.

LMP3: Anthony Mantella, Wayne Boyd, Nico Varrone and Thomas Merrill drove the No. 17 AWA Duqueine D08 to victory by 12 laps for the team’s first class win in IMSA.


STATS PACKAGE FOR ROLEX 24 HOURS OF DAYTONA:

Fastest laps by driver

Fastest laps by driver after race (over the weekend)

Fastest laps by driver and class after race

Fastest lap sequence

Lap chart

Leader sequence

Race analysis by lap

Stint analysis

Time cards

Pit stop time cards

Best sector times

Race distance and speed average

Flag analysis

Weather report

NEXT: The 2023 IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship season will resume with the Mobil 1 Twelve Hours of Sebring March 18 with coverage across NBC, USA and Peacock.