IndyCar

IndyCar’s young drivers could became new faces of series

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INDIANAPOLIS (AP) Twenty-three-year-old Zach Veach looks like the perfect guy for IndyCar’s youth movement.

He has a solid resume. He has a full-time ride with one of the series’ top teams, stable sponsorship and what appears to be a bright future. He understands the art of doing business and, in his first full-time season, he already sounds like a veteran.

If Veach succeeds, he could emerge as a cornerstone for the next generation of stars in the open-wheel series.

“It’s exciting to be part of something like this,” Veach said. “It’s humbling, too, because you can be the front-runner in Indy Lights and you come over here and you have to learn some things.”

Veach finished 19th at Barber and 26th at Indianapolis in his only two starts last season. This year, he finished 16th at the first two races, posted a career-best fourth at Long Beach and was 23rd in Saturday’s 24-car field at the IndyCar Grand Prix.

Series officials don’t necessarily need Veach to jump to the forefront just yet. They’re not going all in on one guy, either.

It’s possible more than 20 percent of this year’s Indianapolis 500 starters could be, like Veach, younger than 25. The class is rich in diversity and talent:

– Gabby Chaves, a 24-year–old Colombian, fended off Veach to claim the 2014 Indy Lights title. He competes with upstart Harding Racing.

– Ed Jones, the 23-year-old from Dubai, was last year’s rookie of the year driver for powerhouse Chip Ganassi Racing.

– Kyle Kaiser, a 22-year-old Californian, was hired by Juncos Racing after winning last year’s Indy Lights title.

– Matheus Leist, a 19-year-old Brazilian, won last year’s Freedom 100 at Indy and now is being mentored by 2014 series champion Tony Kanaan at A.J. Foyt Racing.

– Pietro Fittipaldi, a 21-year-old Brazilian, will miss the Indy 500 after breaking his left leg and right ankle during qualifying for the World Endurance Championship. On Saturday, Dale Coyne Racing used 20-year-old Zachary Claman De Melo as the replacement.

– American Sage Karam, 23 and the 2013 Indy Lights winner, has shown promise in a variety of series but still hasn’t secured a full-time ride in IndyCar. He is attempting to make his fifth 500 start with Dreyer & Reinbold Racing.

Veterans of the series believe this young group has a better chance of making an impact together than previously-hyped classes.

“We’ve got good, quality guys under 25 and now they’re driving for owners who hopefully will stick with them because that’s how I think that’s what develops them,” Ganassi Racing executive director Mike Hull said. “I think the crop you’re talking about is the crop we’ve needed for a long, long time but we didn’t have the stability to do that. Now, we do.”

Jay Frye, IndyCar president of competition and operations, is a big believer in the young guys. He called this group “advanced” in terms of their experience and business savvy.

The problem, of course, becomes marketing.

In a sport where winning matters, big names rule, and sponsorship money is increasingly more difficult to find and keep, the biggest challenge might be finding teams and companies that are patient enough to stick with a young guy long enough to reap the rewards.

Hull estimates it takes about three years for most drivers to become consistently competitive in IndyCar.

“I’m not expecting to come in and win races right off the bat with a new car and a new team,” Kaiser said. “It just takes time and experience. Nothing trumps experience.”

Except actually winning.

The driver with the most at stake this month may be Karam, whose only scheduled race this season is the May 27 Indianapolis 500. Practice begins Tuesday with qualifying scheduled for Saturday and Sunday.

“The hardest part is when you’re not a full-time driver and you don’t have a resume to show sponsors you can do well,” Karam said. “So this is what everyone sees. If I win, it would be a game-changer and you’d see a lot more of me.”

Perhaps the greatest asset in this young class is their determination to deliver on the promise.

“We all root for the young guys because we know hard it is to get here and how hard it is to stay here,” Veach said. “The business side has to be taken very seriously. When you’re young, you have to find a way to present yourself in a mature way to get the meetings you need to get. It’s not the ’90s any more where you can rely on talent.”

Reports: Fernando Alonso to test on September 5 at Barber Motorsports Park

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According to a number of media stories Thursday afternoon and evening, two-time Formula One champion Fernando Alonso will reportedly test an Indy car at Barber Motorsports Park on Wednesday, September 5.

The 2.38-mile permanent road course just outside Birmingham, Alabama, per those stories, will play host to Alonso as he reportedly tests with IndyCar’s Andretti Autosport team and Honda.

Honda Performance Development (HPD) President Art St. Cyr issued a statement late Thursday afternoon about Alonso’s reported upcoming test:

“Fernando Alonso is one of the premier racing drivers of this generation, and we very much enjoyed working with him at the 2017 Indianapolis 500.

“He has shown that he can be very competitive right off the bat, and it would be great for IndyCar if he were to decide to drive here full-time after his F1 career. Having Alonso as a driver would be an obvious benefit for any team or manufacturer.”

However, St. Cyr’s statement also included a reference to Honda potentially not being able to field a new engine for Alonso in the IndyCar series in 2019.

“Our engine lease agreements are made between HPD and specific teams,” St. Cyr’s statement said. “Several of our current IndyCar Series teams already have agreements in place with HPD for the 2019 season, and we have been operating near maximum capacity all year long to properly provide powerful, reliable engines for all of our teams.

“We have had discussions with several current and potential teams for 2019, and those discussions are ongoing.”

Rumors of Alonso potentially racing for a hybrid operation that would include Andretti Autosport, McLaren and Harding Racing have been picking up speed. But there’s one potential major hurdle: Harding’s Dallara’s are powered by Chevrolet engines.

Alonso announced earlier this week that he’d be retiring from Formula One at season’s end, saying he’s looking forward to new adventures.

Because of his loyalty to McLaren, it’s increasingly looking as if Alonso comes to IndyCar, McLaren will have some involvement – although perhaps not as much as it potentially could do if it went all-in with a full-time effort immediately in 2019.

There is no word whether Chevrolet or Harding Racing could potentially be on hand at the Sept. 5 test at BMP, even in just an observation role.

Since being part of the winning team at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in June, Alonso’s desire to become only the second driver to win motorsport’s triple crown – the Monaco Grand Prix, Le Mans and the Indianapolis 500 – has increased exponentially.

He’s already won the first two; just a Indy 500 triumph remains on his bucket list.

The late Graham Hill is the only driver to have accomplished the triple crown feat to date.

Alonso, who turned 37 on July 29, has made just one prior IndyCar start, in the 2017 Indianapolis 500. He led 27 laps of the 200-lap event and appeared to have a car strong enough to win before it suffered engine failure with 21 laps remaining.

Instead of what likely could have been a top-five finish, if not a win, Alonso’s first foray into IndyCar racing ended disappointingly with a 24th-place finish.

In addition to being courted by IndyCar, NASCAR has also jumped into the Alonso sweepstakes, saying he’d be welcome to race in the 2019 Daytona 500.

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