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Scott Dixon’s pit crew wins Pit Stop Challenge

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Action on Carb Day concluded in the afternoon with the annual Pit Stop Challenge, and it was Scott Dixon’s No. 9 PNC Bank Honda team for Chip Ganassi Racing that took home top honors.

The No. 9 team defeated James Hinchcliffe’s No. 5 Arrow Electronics Honda team for Schmidt Peterson Motorsports in the final round to claim the $50,000 prize, doing so in a best-of-three championship round that saw them win the first and third legs.

Blair Julian, the chief mechanic on Dixon’s car, revealed that the team wasn’t exactly feeling any extra pressure in the final round.

“I think every pit stop is about the same amount of pressure,” said Julian. “Obviously the last one is sort of ramped up a little bit. I think we’ve all been doing it enough time we can do it. Try to make it clean and get out.”

Dixon also highlighted the importance of the competition and how it spotlights the rest of the team, and gives them a well-deserved moment in the sun.

“It’s a big deal to show just how much of a team sport this is,” Dixon asserted. “It’s never just one single person. It’s many trying to achieve the same objective. Some days I’m able to make a couple passes on track, but most of the time these guys are able to make it a lot easier for me and the team by gaining places in these pit stops.”

Dixon will now luck to become the first driver since Helio Castroneves in 2009 to win the Indianapolis 500 after his team won the Pit Stop Challenge.

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Kyle Busch happy with first stint: ‘Put me in the car, there’s excitement!’

AP Photo/Terry Renna
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DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. – The Rolex 24 at Daytona debut of the “KB Show” was cut short by a strategy maneuver but still delivered drama and a positive result.

Kyle Busch got the No. 14 RCF GT3 Lexus back on the lead lap and back in contention for a GTD victory at Daytona International Speedway.

“It was good,” Kyle Busch said with a broad smile after a 42-minute stint. “Just, uh, shit, put me in the car, and there’s excitement around! Drove all my way back to the lead lap and everything.

“Overall, we’ve had a good experience and hell I only got one stint in, so I’m ready for more. Sign me up, coach!”

The two-time Cup champion was expected to drive for at least 90 minutes, but the first full-course caution of the race (with 19 hours and 16 minutes remaining) caused AIM Vasser Sullivan to change up its drive plan. Busch was called to the pits in favor of Parker Chase.

“With all the strategy and the way the wave-bys work here, it’s quite different than what we’re accustomed to (in NASCAR),” said Busch, who likely will drive longer now later in the race. “That wasn’t bad. To get ourselves back on the lead lap and back to a position where we can start scrapping again hopefully is what we needed.

“So I got one stint in, but I’m trying to save myself and (teammate) Jack (Hawksworth) for a little later.”

Busch climbed into the car shortly after 6 p.m. as the last of the No. 14’s four drivers. He complained a few times on his radio about traffic, which he said was his biggest challenge.

“There were a couple of instances we ran down a smaller car, and (it was) just mirror driving in front of us,” he said. “That was pretty bad. We lost probably 2 seconds on that. Overall, I guess that’s road racing.

The yellow flag was exactly what Busch’s team needed after being forced to start from the rear of the field when it missed qualifying because of an engine change. Hawksworth, who started the race, said the car was “quick in the wrong places and slow in the right places” after struggling with handling and speed in the first stint.

“I don’t feel we’re out of it,” Hawksworth said. “It’s a very long race. Still early days. We need to work on having speed for the end of the race. The position right now doesn’t really make any difference. We’ll need to find some performance at the end of the race to fight for the win.”