Photo courtesy of Travis Pastrana/Nitro Circus

Travis Pastrana’s goal: ‘Try not to die’ in bid to replicate 3 of Evel Knievel’s most famous jumps

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Sunday in Las Vegas, Travis Pastrana will attempt to replicate and safely exceed the lengths of three of the most famous jump attempts by legendary motorcycle daredevil Evel Knievel – including flying over the fountain at Caesar’s Palace – a stunt that almost killed Knievel in 1967.

Pastrana, 34, will try to channel Knievel during a three-hour live broadcast on The History Channel (8 to 11 p.m. ET) titled “Evel Live.” He will do one different jump per hour, and each jump will be slightly longer than those that Knievel originally attempted.

“We have this awesome opportunity to recreate three of the most iconic jumps by the most iconic stuntman who ever lived,” Pastrana told People.com. “I really want to bring back the showmanship and the fun of these events.”

In addition to the fame associated with the event, the 34-year-old Pastrana has one other goal, as he told TheWrap.com: “Try not to die.”

Even on Pastrana’s own web site, NitroCircus.com, is asking, “Will Travis Survive the Stunt That Almost Killed Evel?”

Pastrana will start off the evening attempting to fly over 52 crushed and stacked cars (155 feet in length), then will fly over 16 buses (238 feet), and the grand finale of jumping 155 feet over the fountain.

Knievel made attempts over 50 crushed and stacked cars, 14 buses and a slightly shorter distance over the Caesar’s Palace fountain.

One thing of note to mention: Due to construction and capital improvements/modifications over the years since Knievel’s fountain jump, Pastrana will have a very difficult challenge: approximately half the stopping area than Knievel did when he made his attempt over the fountain.

To further honor Knievel, who made most of his jumps in a trademark red, white and blue firesuit with stars on it and a cape around his neck, Pastrana will wear a similar outfit.

“Evel always wore a cape and white leathers, and he captured that America theme that everyone knows,” Pastrana told People.com. “So we even went as far as going to the same tailor who did Evel’s boots, and they’re probably the most expensive item I’ve ever had! Definitely the most expensive shoes I’ve ever had.”

Pastrana will also ride a similar type of bike – an Indian Scout FTR750 V Twin – that Knievel used on most of his famous leaps.

The Indian Scout is about twice as heavy as the lightweight dirt bikes Pastrana is used to riding. But he wanted to keep all the jumps as close as possible to Knievel’s stunts, which is why he’ll be riding the Scout.

“My God, how did he get this tank in the air?” Pastrana told People.com about Knievel’s bike. “In true Evel fashion, every time I jump it it’s scary. The motorcycle is awesome. It’s got great power and awesome delivery. It’s super, super fast but it’s not meant to fly.

“It’s hard to manipulate in the air and if you take off wrong it’s kind of how you’re going to land. I’ve got three jumps. If I crash the first one and I’m physically able to get up I have to get back up. Not just for me, but for what we’re doing.”

The fountain could be the most difficult jump for Pastrana. It certainly was for Knievel, who suffered a crushed pelvis and femur, fractures to both hips, wrists and ankles and a concussion.

Pastrana obviously hopes a similar fate does not befall him. But at the same time, he’s prepared for the risks he’s undertaking.

If conditions such as wind change while in mid-jump, he’ll have to make split-second adjustments on the fly – no pun intended – and hope he lands safely.

“People like to see a good crash, but they like to see that person get back up… and land it,” Pastrana told TheWrap.com. “People want to know that it’s dangerous. They want to know that the boundaries are being pushed and that it is something incredible.”

One of Travis Pastrana’s signature moves that likely won’t be seen Sunday night. Photo Getty Images.

Knievel, who made over 75 jumps in his daredevil career and still holds the Guinness Book of World Records for most broken bones in a career (433), passed away in 2007 from heart failure at the age of 69 years old.

Sportscaster (of “American Ninja Warrior” fame) and licensed physician Matt Iseman will call play-by-play of all three of Pastrana’s jumps.

“The reality is this entire show hinges on him nailing it,” Iseman said of Pastrana to the New York Post. “If this guy has a pulse, if he can rev a gas handle, he’ll go and that’s what makes me love him and fear for him at the same time.

“He’s as close to Evel Knievel as we’ve got.”

Here are videos of three of Knievel’s infamous jumps that Pastrana will attempt to replicate – but hopefully not have the same outcomes on two of them:

Caesar’s Palace fountain jump — Dec. 31, 1967

Bus jump at Wembley Stadium – May 25, 1975

Knievel jumping 50 crushed cars at Los Angeles Coliseum on Feb. 18, 1973

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View from the pits: Reporters’ picks for the 103rd Indianapolis 500

INDYCAR / Jason Porter
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It’s Race Day in Indianapolis, and for the first time, the Indianapolis 500 will be on NBC.

Time will tell what impact Mother Nature has on today’s 103rd Running of the Greatest Spectacle in Racing. But no matter what, prerace coverage begins today on NBCSN at 9 a.m. ET, then transitions over to NBC at 11 a.m. ET.

All month long, the INDYCAR on NBC pit reporters have been bringing you the latest breaking news and stories for the Brickyard. Now, Kevin Lee, Kelli Stavast and Marty Snider share their insights from pit road. Read on …

KEVIN LEE

Throughout the last two weeks, one common theme has been, “Don’t crash.” There were five crashes, and four of those teams/drivers ended up in the Last Row Shootout. Two of the three bumped (Patricio O’Ward and Fernando Alonso) were in backup cars following heavy impacts.

Several drivers have consistently been among the strongest. Simon Pagenaud (pictured, left) not only starts on pole but has been strong in race trim as well. All three Ed Carpenter Racing cars are fast and appear good in traffic. Alexander Rossi looks like he can put his car wherever he wants, and Scott Dixon has five championships and 44 IndyCar wins, so he must be watched.

In order, my picks for most likely to drink the milk are Pagenaud, Rossi, Ed Carpenter, Will Power and Dixon.

KELLI STAVAST

A week ago, no one could have predicted that two-time world champion Fernando Alonso and McLaren Racing would be bumped from the Indy 500 by a single-car, part-time effort of Juncos Racing and its driver, Kyle Kaiser (pictured, right).  But it happened, and Kaiser now occupies the 33rd and final spot in the Greatest Spectacle in Racing.

So what next?  I spoke with Kyle five days after the dramatic qualifying effort, and he told me he has never been happier to finish last and that he is still “buzzing” from that experience—an energy he hopes to carry straight through to the race.  He also told me that the response from fans has been positive with people stopping him in public (including at Chipotle) to hug him and congratulate him on making the Big Show.

But reality might have set in for the Californian who now lives in Indy.  During Carb Day’s final practice, the team struggled to get a good handling car for Kyle, who described the day as “challenging.”  But Kaiser also acknowledged that the team made some progress throughout the practice and at the very least collected some data that might help for the 500-miler on Sunday.

Whether he finishes 1st or 31st on Sunday, Kyle Kaiser and Juncos Racing will have plenty of fond memories to carry with them from the 103rd Indy 500.

MARTY SNIDER

First, we cannot wait to bring you guys the 103rd running of the Indianapolis 500. It’s an honor for our entire group to broadcast such an amazing event.

So what do we expect? I have no idea, to be honest. The weather will be a huge factor today. It might be a race to halfway if rain is forecast.  If it’s cooler (mid 70’s ambient, which it looks like it’s going to be), Alexander Rossi (pictured, left) was unstoppable in those conditions last Monday.

But Rossi was very unhappy with his car on Carb Day. For that matter, most teams were. But Rob Edwards of Andretti Autosport explained a few things to Rossi about all of the experimenting they were doing in final practice, and I think that team is in a much better frame of mind heading into the race.

I find it interesting that Simon Pagenaud’s team scuffed in literally every set of tires they will use for today’s race. The No. 22 camp is convinced (and they’re not wrong) that one of the keys to Will Power’s 2018 win was his ability to gain time on out laps after pit stops. Scuffing in tires helps that out lap time. It also allows teams to do a balance check on tires. Good thing they did: Kyle Moyer of Team Penske found two sets that had vibrations, which would have been bad in the race.

Bottom line, I haven’t seen anyone really stand out and show me they can beat Alexander Rossi yet. So I’m going with Rossi to win his second Indy 500.

Enjoy the show friends. It’s going to be a fantastic race!