Photo courtesy of IMSA

IMSA details plans for 50th anniversary in 2019

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ELKHART LAKE, Wis.  – What began as the sanctioning body for a Formula Ford and Formula Vee race at Pocono Raceway in October 1969 has grown over five decades to become an international auto racing powerhouse specializing in world-class sports car competition, and next year, the International Motor Sports Association (IMSA) turns 50.

To commemorate the golden anniversary, IMSA and stakeholders including series partners, manufacturers, teams, drivers, event promoters and fans will join together in a season-long 50th Anniversary celebration that will begin with the 2019 Rolex 24 At Daytona on the weekend of Jan. 24-27 and will carry all the way through to the season-ending Motul Petit Le Mans at Road Atlanta on Oct. 11-13.

Photo courtesy of IMSA

“Almost 50 years ago, Bill France Sr. and John and Peggy Bishop laid a foundation that today supports one of the most prominent auto racing organizations in the world,” said IMSA President Scott Atherton. “The story of IMSA over the past five decades is truly fascinating and will be told throughout our 2019 50th Anniversary celebration in several ways by a variety of stakeholders.

“From historic race car liveries and commemorative logos to many other surprises throughout the season for fans at-track and watching through our new-for-2019 partnership with NBC Sports, it will be a year-long celebration for all to enjoy.”

A key component of the celebration is the official 50th Anniversary IMSA logo that was publicly unveiled for the first time this evening as part of the State of the Series presentation at Road America. The logo – which will be featured on items such as uniforms, race car liveries and commemorative merchandise in 2019 — incorporates many elements of the traditional IMSA logo, including the 27-degree angle from vertical center and the familiar “apex arrow” that has long been a part of IMSA’s brand identity.

Enhancing the logo is the use of gold to signify IMSA’s “golden” anniversary, as well as laurels that symbolize excellence, honor and victory. A secondary commemorative logo, which replaces the standard red in the current IMSA logo with gold and features the addition of “Est. 1969” also was unveiled and will be used throughout 2019 in selected applications as well.

IMSA will be centering its celebration around four cornerstones – “Drivers and Teams,” “Tracks,” “Manufacturers” and “Fans”. These pillars will be highlighted at 2019 events and will have a presence the entire season as the foundation of what has made IMSA what it is today.

Additional elements of the IMSA 50th Anniversary celebration will be unveiled soon.

Follow@KyleMLavigne

 

Are you a racer looking for the fountain of youth? Try NHRA drag racing

Photos courtesy NHRA
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It used to be that many of the big-name race car drivers routinely raced into their 50s, most notably in NASCAR.

Richard Petty raced until he was 55. The late David Pearson was 54 when he last raced in NASCAR.

But these days, we’re seeing the majority of professional racers calling it quits in their early-to-mid 40s – like Tony Stewart, Jeff Gordon, Dale Earnhardt Jr., Greg Biffle and most recently, Jamie McMurray.

But that’s not the case for competitors in the National Hot Rod Association. Like fine wine, it seems that the kings of the drag strip only seem to get better and more successful with age.

To them, the “r word” is not “retire,” it’s “reaction time.”

Consider many of today’s stars in the NHRA and their respective ages:

* Funny Car legend John Force will turn 70 in May. And while he hasn’t won a championship since 2013, Force remains one of the biggest forces – no pun intended – in the sport.

Fellow Funny Car drivers still seemingly in their prime include Ron Capps (53 years old), Jack Beckman (52), Tim Wilkerson (turns 58 on Dec. 29), Cruz Pedregon (55) and Gary Densham (62).

* In Top Fuel, the winningest driver and record eight-time champ Tony Schumacher will turn 49 on Dec. 25. Those already on the other side of the 50-year-old line include Clay Millican (52), Doug Kalitta (54), Terry McMillen (64), Billy Torrence (60) and Cory McClenathan (turns 56 on Jan. 30).

Chris Karamesines

And let’s not forget the oldest active drag racer on the NHRA professional circuit (albeit part-time rather than full-time), Chicago native Chris Karamesines, who is still racing a Top Fuel dragster at 300-plus mph at the spry young age of 87 years old!

Yes, you read that right, Karamesines is 87 – but could easily pass for 67 – and he has no intention of retiring anytime soon.

* Ironically, the slower Pro Stock class is not as well-represented in the 50-and-over group as is Top Fuel and Funny Car, with only two regulars who have passed the half-century mark: four-time champ Greg Anderson (57) and Kenny Delco (65).

But that 50-and-above fraternity will add at least one other member next year when former champ Jason Line turns 50 on July 24. And five-time champ Jeg Coughlin Jr. will turn 50 in 2020.

Jerry Savoie

* Even the easy riders of Pro Stock Motorcycle have several 50-and-over competitors: Scotty Pollacheck (turns 50 on Feb. 8), 2016 champ Jerry Savoie (turns 60 on Feb. 23), Karen Stofer (54), Steve Johnson (turns 58 on Jan. 19) and Hector Arana (60).

Granted, drag racers don’t have the same grueling time spent behind the wheel. Their average run lasts from just over 3.5 seconds to maybe eight or nine seconds.

And unlike driving 400 or 500 laps or miles as in NASCAR, a full four-round race during Sunday eliminations for NHRA racers adds up to one whole mile – or less.

Top Fuel and Funny Car drivers only go a distance of 1,000 feet per run, while Pro Stock and Pro Stock Motorcycle go a full quarter-mile (1,320 feet) in their respective runs.

In a sense, hitting the 5-0 mark or higher has become somewhat of a fountain of youth for several racers.

For example, Capps won his first career Funny Car crown in 2016 at the age of 51.

The same year, Savoie won his first career PSM title at the age of 57.

And Force won his most recent Funny Car title in 2013 at the age of 64.

Force has already gone on record to say that he wants to become the first major pro champion to win a title at 70 years old – which would also become the 17th championship of his illustrious career as the winningest driver in all NHRA history.

He gets a chance toward doing just that when the 2019 NHRA season kicks off at Pomona, California, on Feb. 7-10.

Follow @JerryBonkowski