Fernando Alonso to retire from F1 at season’s end; could IndyCar be next?

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Two-time Formula One champion Fernando Alonso announced today that he will retire from racing in the series at the end of the current season.

Alonso, who captured back-to-back F1 championships in 2005 (becoming the youngest driver at the time to do so in F1 annals) and 2006, will end his overall career and a four-year stint with McLaren, an organization that has struggled for results and performance over the last few seasons.

Alonso, 37, is in his 17th full-time F1 season, having made his debut in the global series in the 2001 Australian Grand Prix. He currently sits ninth in the standings with just 44 points, compared to series leader Lewis Hamilton’s 213 points.

Alonso, a native of Oviedo, Spain, has made 303 career starts in F1, capturing 32 wins, 97 podium finishes and 22 poles.

However, he has struggled miserably at times, particularly over the last five seasons. His last win came in 2013 and his last podium finish came in 2014.

MORE: Column: The sooner Fernando Alonso (hopefully) comes to IndyCar, the better

In addition to his two championship-winning seasons while racing for Renault, Alonso also finished runner-up in the 2010, 2012 and 2013 seasons, and ended up third in 2007.

“After 17 wonderful years in this amazing sport it’s time for me to make a change and move on,” Alonso said in a statement. “I made this decision some months ago and it was a firm one.

“There are still several grands prix to go this season, and I will take part in them with more commitment and passion than ever.”

Alonso has been strongly rumored to potentially compete in the Verizon IndyCar Series starting next season.

He reportedly was going to drive for a McLaren-owned team — or a potential partnership between McLaren and an existing IndyCar team such as Andretti Autosport — but those plans appear to have fallen through as McLaren recently announced it is committed and focused first and foremost on improving its lot in F1.

McLaren boss Zak Brown said in a statement that Alonso is “the pre-eminent driver of his generation.”

“There is a time for everyone to make a change and Fernando has decided the end of this season to be his,” Brown said. “We respect his decision, even if we believe he is in the finest form of his career. Our open dialogue with Fernando has meant we could plan for this eventuality.

“While evaluating his future during the past months, Fernando’s competitiveness has been undimmed. He has continued to perform at the highest level throughout, as we know he will do in the remaining nine races of this year’s championship.”

Could Alonso still come to IndyCar? There’s no question several teams would be interested, including Andretti Autosport, for whom he competed in the 2017 Indianapolis 500. Other teams that are reportedly interested in him include Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing and Chip Ganassi Racing.

Speaking of the latter, Scott Dixon announced yesterday that he has agreed to a new multi-year extension to remain with CGR. And, team owner Chip Ganassi after cutting back from four to two teams for 2018, did not completely rule out the possibility of adding a third team in 2019, which could present an attractive option for Alonso, who is a longtime friend of Dixon’s.

Prior to Monday’s announcement, several rumors had linked Dixon joining Alonso at McLaren, either in F1 or IndyCar. Now, it’s anyone’s guess if Alonso will come to IndyCar or potentially drive in other series, including the World Endurance Championship or IMSA.

“Let’s see what the future brings; new exciting challenges are around the corner,” Alonso said. “I’m having one of the happiest times ever in my life but I need to go on exploring new adventures.”

In June, Alonso won the Le Mans 24 Hours endurance race in his first attempt. That gave him the second part of motorsport’s unofficial “triple crown,” having twice previously won the Monaco Grand Prix.

Alonso has spoken at length previously about how he’d love to become only the second driver in history – joining Graham Hill – to complete the triple crown with a win in the Indianapolis 500.

Now, that potential opportunity looks even bigger than ever, given Tuesday’s announcement.

However, Alonso also hinted that he could still potentially rejoin McLaren in the future.

“I want to thank everyone at McLaren,” he said. “My heart is with the team forever.

“I know they will come back stronger and better in the future and it could be the right moment for me to be back in the series; that would make me really happy.”

In a video letter he posted on Twitter, Alonso thanked F1 officials and fellow teams and drivers for what has been a spectacular career.

Among his comments in that video letter:

“We had very good times, some unforgettable, others really bad. We have played together, against incredible rivals. You played with me, and I learned how to play with you too.

“I have seen you changing, sometimes for good, sometimes in my opinion for bad. Every time I close the visor of my helmet I feel your warm embrace, your energy, there is nothing like it.

“But today I have some other bigger challenges than those you can offer me. And this year, while I am still driving at my best, is how I want to remember you.

“I can only be grateful to you and to the people that are part of you, for having introduced to me so many cultures, traditions, languages, wonderful people, for having been my life.

“I know you love me, be certain that I love you too.”

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Dean Wilson’s life as a privateer reconnects the rider to his roots

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One of the added benefits of subscribing to NBC Sports Gold is the in-depth interviews from each Saturday’s action. Last week between the first and second rounds of qualification for the Glendale Supercross race, a relaxed and confident Dean Wilson joined Race Day Live’s Daniel Blair and Jim Holley to review his fourth-place finish in the season opener and his mindset moving forward.

Losing factory support from Rockstar / Husqvarna at the end of 2018 was not exactly what Wilson had in mind, but after getting off to a great start in the first two races this season, it may well have been a blessing in disguise.

The life of a privateer is not exactly relaxed, but it affords a rider the opportunity to call his own shots. For Wilson, it is also a way to reconnect with the grassroots feel that attracted him to Supercross in the first place.

“I think that’s what I like,” Wilson said on Race Day Live. “I think that’s the environment and atmosphere I like – it’s just more low key. At Anaheim I, you would think I was local racing at Glen Helen. I had a Sprinter and I had another trailer just to chill in, do my spins. It was so cold I had a little propane heater to warm me up. But I like that. That’s what works for me.”

MORE: Dean Wilson’s Cinderella story at Anaheim 

The program Wilson was able to put together during the offseason produced back-to back top 10s – a much better start to the 2019 season than he experienced last year.

In 2018, Wilson did not score a top 10 until his fourth feature at San Diego. His first top five would not come until late March in Indianapolis.

This year Wilson got the hole shot and led 14 laps at Anaheim in the opener before finishing fourth. Last week in Glendale, he finished eighth.

“What was going through my head was ‘it’s about time; it’s about five years too late to lead some laps here,’ ” Wilson described his emotion as he led at Anaheim. “It was nice because I did a lot of work in the off-season and my starts were really good. The thing is I haven’t over-analyzed my starts and practice.”

At Anaheim I, Wilson struggled with visibility as his goggles began to get fouled by mud. A once comfortable lead was eroded by Justin Barcia. With pressure from behind, Wilson made a minor mistake that was then compounded by lapped traffic.

“I was leading my laps; I was just trying to hit my marks. I was doing really well until I made a couple of mistakes. I couldn’t hit that middle double, double … the rut was getting real chewed out, but I was already on the right side where you couldn’t double the middle part so you had to go roll, roll, roll – and Barcia was already on me.”

Wilson’s pair of top 10s was enough to keep him fifth in the standings, three points behind Glendale’s winner Blake Baggett.

For more, watch the video above.

Next Race: Anaheim II Jan. 19, 11 p.m., NBCSN

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