Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography

Indy Lights: Ryan Norman outduels Colton Herta for first career win

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It was hardly a surprise that a pair of Andretti Autosport teammates engaged in a duel for the race win in the Indy Lights Presented by Cooper Tires, but it was slightly different from the usual battle we’ve seen lately.

While Colton Herta, who started on the pole, was expected to be in the fight for the win, teammate Ryan Norman was his surprise counterpart this time – Patricio O’Ward started third and was shuffled back to fifth on the opening lap, and could only get back up to third and was not a factor for the win.

Herta and Norman engaged in a thrilling late-race dog fight that saw Norman routinely try outside passes on Herta at seemingly every turn, with Herta able to hold him off every time.

However, Norman eventually timed his move perfectly and sliced to the inside of Herta entering Turn 3 to take the lead with less than 10 laps remaining.

Herta tried to battle back, but was unable to get back around Norman, and the 20-year from Ohio took his first career Indy Lights win.

“Colton put up a great fight, props to him, that was such a fun race. It’s a huge weight lifted off my shoulders,” said an elated Norman afterward.

“I knew I had to do it with only two weekends left. I’ve had podiums this season, but some of those were given and I wanted to show everyone that I am capable of really racing for wins. But this whole field is amazing: I believe that if there were 15 cars, it would still be these top seven cars. It’s such a cool series to be a part of and I’m glad I’m here.”

O’Ward rounded out the podium in third, with Santi Urrutia, Aaron Telitz, Victor Franzoni, and Dalton Kellett completing the finishing order.

Herta did reduce the points deficit to O’Ward, but only marginally. O’Ward now leads by 25 points entering the final race weekend of the year at Portland International Raceway.

Pro Mazda: VeeKay Inches Closer to Championship With Fifth Win in a Row

Rinus VeeKay took his fifth win in a row on Saturday. Photo: Indianapolis Motor Speedway, LLC Photography

Rinus VeeKay overtook pole sitter Harrison Scott off the start and rocketed away to take a dominating victory in the Pro Mazda Championship Presented by Cooper Tires.

VeeKay led all 55 laps on the way to the victory, his fifth in a row and seventh of the 2018 season.

“I knew the start would be the time to make a move and risked it a little bit going into Turn 1 because I didn’t know how the car was going to be. But the car stayed stable and I got around Harrison in Turns 3 and 4 and held it the rest of the way for a 1-2 for the team,” Veekay said afterward.

“They gave me a great race car, so I’m so grateful. I tried to focus in every corner, on doing the best I could and not take more risks than I needed to because the championship was in the back of my mind. I stayed pretty cool – but in my head, not around me because it was super hot.”

Teammate Robert Megennis came home second to make it a Juncos Racing 1-2, while Harrison Scott rounded out the podium in third. Moises de la Vara and Oliver Askew rounded out the top five.

Parker Thompson, VeeKay’s championship rival, started last after suffering an electrical issue in qualifying and could do no better than sixth at the checkered flag.

As such, VeeKay now leads Thompson by 47 points entering Portland.

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WATCH: Red Bull F1 team completes pit stop in zero gravity

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The Red Bull Racing pit crew may have already made headlines last weekend when it completed the fastest pit stop in Formula One history, changing Max Verstappen’s tires in 1.82 seconds, but the team’s most recent stunt took their skills to new heights – quite literally.

With the help of the Russian Space agency Roscomos, a group of the team’s mechanics completed the world’s first zero-gravity pit stop, on-board a IIyushin II-76K cosmonaut training plane.

Using a 2005 BR1, the team filmed the viral video over the course of a week, enduring seven flights and about 80 parabolas – periods in which the plane climbs 45 degrees before falling again at a ballistic arch of 45 degrees, creating a period of weightlessness for approximately 22 seconds.

With such a short time frame between weightlessness periods, the car and equipment had to be both quickly and safely secured before gravity once again took effect. Each filming lasted roughly 15 seconds, and the stunt was the most physically and technically demanding activity the live demo team had ever undertaken.

“It pushed us harder than I thought it would,” said Red Bull Support Team Mechanic Joe Robinson. “You realize how much you rely on gravity when you don’t have any!

“It challenges you to think and operate in a different way – and that was brilliant. It was a once in a lifetime opportunity and honestly, I could have stayed and done it all month. It was amazing. I think it’s the coolest, most fun thing the Live Demo team has ever done with a show car.”

Though Red Bull was the first team to perform a pit stop in zero gravity, surprisingly Red Bull was not the first team to put a car through zero gravity. In 1999, McLaren driver David Coulthard and his car experienced zero gravity as part of a promotion for then-sponsor West Cigarettes.

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