In any language, Sato’s Portland win is big for him, his team — and likely his future

Sato and team co-owner Bobby Rahal celebrate Sunday's win. Photo: IndyCar
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Takuma Sato could have used any word – be it in American or Japanese – to help propel him through the final laps of Sunday’s Grand Prix of Portland.

But he chose a word from his native tongue that he kept repeating to himself as he drove through the closing laps around Portland International Raceway.

That word was “Ganbare,” which in Japanese means both “good luck” and “hang in there.”

Even with Ryan Hunter-Reay knocking on Sato’s back door, particularly on the final two laps, good luck was on Sato’s side as he indeed hung in there to earn his third career IndyCar win.

Sato wasn’t even on the radar to win Sunday’s race. He qualified 20th out of 25 entrants, but that didn’t deter him.

Sato felt he had as good a chance as anyone to get a top 10, maybe even a top 5.

And that’s exactly what happened for the only Japanese driver to ever win the Indianapolis 500 (2017).

“It’s a fantastic weekend for all of us,” Sato said after the race. “Who won, I don’t care. Obviously I wanted to win. I won a street course (2013 Long Beach), won a superspeedway (Indy 500), very close to (winning on a) short oval, but my first career win on a road course means a lot. Obviously it’s important.

“Number of wins, I always wanted to have more. I think three wins from Long Beach, Indy 500, such a history in Portland in this fashion, I’m really, really happy today.”

Sato was the star for RLL Sunday as teammate Graham Rahal was collected in a big first lap crash, came back on the track briefly before calling it a day and finishing 23rd out of 25 entrants.

Sato picked up the torch for Team RLL and ran with it – well, actually, drove with it – through the final 25 laps of the 105-lap event in IndyCar’s return to Portland after an 11-year absence.

Granted, Sato’s win Sunday was nowhere near as big as his triumph at Indy last year. But to be able to travel to Portland for the first time, to meet and see a number of Japanese race fans and then become front page news once again in his homeland meant the world to Sato.

“It means a lot,” Sato said. “Firstly, thank everyone for all the support for IndyCar, to come back to Portland. I was very excited.

“I knew nothing about Portland. Obviously, I knew the history (of PIR), such an important place for North American racing. The fans are so educated. Generation by generation, so much a great place.”

Portland has a large Asian community, as well as Asian racing fans from Seattle-Tacoma, and northern California. It’s also an easy flight from his native Japan for fans who wanted to watch him race.

“Here is a very easy (for fans both from the west coast as well as Japan to travel to),” Sato said. “All the West Coast is very easy for Japan to come for the travel.

“We have a very enthusiastic fans from Japan. Also, the Portland community here is a great Asian community, including Japanese, a lot of business, too. We can hear a lot of Japanese cheering on the parade lap. That was great.

“Winning in front of such an enthusiastic crowd in Portland was something I expected, but this was more than expected. I think the people genuinely here are so enthusiastic (and) very happy that IndyCar came back here.”

Given that Portland was the second-to-last race on the schedule, Sunday’s win also potentially helped Sato leave town perhaps feeling a bit more secure about his future, as well.

Even with his win in the Indy 500, Sato surprisingly left Andretti Autosport after last season to rejoin RLL – for which he raced in 2012 – for a one-year deal for 2018 and with an option for 2019.

But options are never guaranteed until they’re picked up – that is, if they’re picked up.

So now, as this season is close to its end, it would be natural to wonder if Sato will return to RLL in 2019.

He even said so after Sunday’s race.

“The future is at the moment uncertain,” he said. “Hopefully this is a boosting to the talk to (return) next year.

“But most important (is) my passion and (I) wanted to win for the team, That’s really come all together. It’s very helping for the situation.”

Indeed it is. A team spokesperson told MotorSportsTalk a few hours after the race that, “We are in the process of extending (Sato’s) contract.”

That’s a good reward for a good job done Sunday.

Or more precisely, it was a day that ended in good luck for Sato because he hung in there all the way to take the checkered flag.

Yep, Sato couldn’t have said it better: “Ganbare!”

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IndyCar releases schedule for 2023 season

IndyCar schedule 2023
Douglas Stringer/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images
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The NTT IndyCar Series’ 2023 schedule will feature the same number of races and tracks as this season with some minor reshuffling of dates.

IndyCar will open the 2023 season March 5 on the streets of St. Petersburg, Florida, and will conclude Sept. 10 at WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca in Monterey, California. The 107th Indy 500 will take place May 28 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

The 17-race schedule will conclude with a stretch of eight races in the final nine weeks.

“The NTT IndyCar Series is on an impactful upward trajectory, making progress at a pace that befits our thrilling style of competition,” Penske Entertainment Corp. president and CEO Mark Miles said in a release. “The 2023 season provides an opportunity to further build on this trend, bringing our sport and its stars to more markets and households and reaching new consumers across the globe.”

There will be 15 events on NBC: 13 races (including six of the final seven) plus Indy 500 qualifying May 20-21. There also are three races on USA Network and the Toronto race exclusively on Peacock. All races on NBC and USA also will have live simulstreams on Peacock.

In partnership with NBC Sports, the 2022 IndyCar season was the most-watched in six years and the most-watched across NBC Sports on record. The 2022 season also was the most streamed season on record.

“We’re very excited for our 2023 NTT IndyCar Series schedule and to build on this past season’s viewership milestones,” NBC Sports vice president of programming Mike Perman said in a release. “In providing comprehensive coverage across NBC, Peacock and USA Network, NBC Sports is once again looking forward to telling the stories of these world-class drivers and this compelling series.”

Notable elements on the 2023 schedule:

–There will be the same balance of seven road course races, five street courses and five ovals.

–St. Pete will be the season opener for the 13th time.

–The Chevrolet Detroit Grand Prix will move from Belle Isle to the streets of downtown.

–The NASCAR doubleheader weekend at the IMS road course will shift to mid-August.

–The World Wide Technology Raceway event will move from Saturday to Sunday.

Start times for the 2023 events will be announced at a later date.

Here’s the 2023 IndyCar schedule:


Date Race/Track Network/Platform
Sun., March 5 Streets of St. Petersburg NBC, Peacock
Sun., April 2 Texas Motor Speedway NBC, Peacock
Sun., April 16 Streets of Long Beach NBC, Peacock
Sun., April 30 Barber Motorsports Park NBC, Peacock
Sat., May 13 Indianapolis Motor Speedway (Road Course) NBC, Peacock
Sun., May 28 The 107th Indianapolis 500 NBC, Peacock
Sun., June 4 Streets of Detroit NBC, Peacock
Sun., June 18 Road America USA Network, Peacock
Sun., July 2 Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course USA Network, Peacock
Sun., July 16 Streets of Toronto Peacock
Sat., July 22 Iowa Speedway – Race 1 NBC, Peacock
Sun., July 23 Iowa Speedway – Race 2 NBC, Peacock
Sun., Aug. 6 Streets of Nashville NBC, Peacock
Sat., Aug. 12 Indianapolis Motor Speedway (Road Course) USA Network, Peacock
Sun., Aug. 27 World Wide Technology Raceway NBC, Peacock
Sun., Sept. 3 Portland International Raceway NBC, Peacock
Sun., Sept. 10 WeatherTech Raceway Laguna Seca NBC, Peacock

*dates and networks/platforms are subject to change