IndyCar: Takuma Sato is surprise winner in Grand Prix of Portland

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PORTLAND, Oregon – Using a combination of adept fuel mileage and sharp strategy, Takuma Sato was the surprise winner in IndyCar’s return to Portland on Sunday.

The Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing driver captured his third career IndyCar win, following up his previous win in the 2017 Indianapolis 500.

“This is big,” Sato said. “Fantastic weekend. Obviously, with the couple of hard, physical weekends, especially at St. Louis (Gateway), we did save fuel and it didn’t work, but you have to keep on going and this time I think the fuel strategy worked really well.

“Most importantly, the No. 30 Mi-Jack / Panasonic car had pace so I could commit. Looking at the fans here in Portland, so enthusiastic, I think this is one of the most beautiful days in my life again.”

Prior to Sunday’s Grand Prix of Portland at Portland International Raceway, Sato’s best finish this season was third at Iowa, followed by fourth at Road America and fifth in Belle Isle 1.

Sato, who started 20th in the 25-driver field, held off Ryan Hunter-Reay, defending race winner Sebastien Bourdais (he won the last IndyCar race here in 2007), Spencer Pigot and Verizon IndyCar Series points leader Scott Dixon.

“We gave that one away,” Hunter-Reay said. “The DHL car was the car to beat today. We had the right fuel, but we had some miscommunication on pit lane. I was saving fuel as Takuma came out of the pit lane and so I didn’t attack.

“That miscommunication probably cost us the race. I’m pretty bummed right now. I know we had a car to win and all day long. I tried really hard to save that fuel and made the fuel mileage the stand was requesting, but couldn’t pay off for it in the end.”

Sato has now won races on a street course (Long Beach 2013), an oval superspeedway (Indianapolis 2017) and now on a permanent road course at Long Beach. He hopes to add a short track oval win to his resume next season.

Dixon had fallen as much as 14 points behind top championship challenger Alexander Rossi early in the race, but battled back to not only regain the lead, he also finished higher in the race as Rossi finished eighth. Dixon leads Rossi by 29 points heading into the season finale at Sonoma Raceway on Sept. 16.

The other two championship contenders, race pole sitter Will Power and teammate and defending series champ Josef Newgarden, are still mathematically in the championship battle, but the odds are long for both going to Sonoma. Power, who finished 21st, is 87 points behind Dixon, while Newgarden, who finished 10th, is also 511 points back. With a maximum of 108 points available at Sonoma, it will be very difficult for Team Penske to earn its third consecutive IndyCar title.

Things got off to a big bang on the opening lap when Zach Veach made contact with James Hinchcliffe, triggering a six-car wreck that left Marco Andretti’s car nearly upside down.

Rescue workers quickly righted Andretti’s car and he was uninjured. He even was able to get back into the race.

Graham Rahal and Ed Jones were also collected. Rahal and Hinchcliffe rejoined the fight to pick up positions, though Rahal soon pulled off after making up two spots and was credited with 23rd. Hinchcliffe ran the remainder of the race, though he finished 29 laps off the lead in 22nd.

Dixon was also hit in the rear, dropping him to 21st position. His car suffered minor damage and after a quick pit stop for repairs, was back on-track.

Then, on Lap 8, pole sitter Will Power suffered a mechanical issue – he appeared to lose the use of first gear – dropping him from the front of the field to 12th. He later nosed into the Turn 11 tire barrier on Lap 43, but was able to return to the pits.

However, Power soon reported that he couldn’t shift gears at all in his No. 12 Verizon Team Penske Chevrolet, and he dropped as many as eight laps off the lead while the team made repairs.

Alexander Rossi and Josef Newgarden looked like they were headed for strong days in the first half of the race – Rossi led most of the opening stint after Power’s trouble, while Newgarden briefly led after passing Rossi on Lap 49.

However, a Lap 56 caution – Zach Veach spun off course in Turns 10 and 11 – ruined their strategy, as each was looking to to make three pit stops. The ill-timed caution forced them to pit, and they dropped to 16th (Newgarden) and 17th (Rossi) at the time.

At the checkered, Rossi could only work his way up to eighth, while Newgarden could do no better than 10th.

As a result, Dixon leads Rossi by 29 points entering the season-ending INDYCAR Grand Prix of Sonoma. Power and Newgarden and tied for third, 87 points back of Dixon, but long shots for the championship now.

“It was a huge day for the team today and feels like a win for us,” Dixon said. “The points, whatever it is, is not a huge amount. I couldn’t see anything once I got off in the dirt at the start, it was just dust everywhere.

“Then I kept getting hit and hit and thought, ‘Oh, this isn’t going to be good.’ Luckily, we were able to keep the PNC Bank car running, back up from the incident and continue. What a crazy day.”

NOTES:

  • Carlos Munoz, filling in for the injured Robert Wickens, finished a respectable 12th given he’s only competed in just one race this season (Indianapolis 500).
  • Charlie Kimball had one of his best days of the season. He qualified last (25th) and finished seventh.
  • Just a week after Honda won the manufacturers championship for 2018, chassis maker Dallara celebrated it’s 300th win when Sato took the checkered flag Sunday.
  • Santino Ferrucci had a decent run in his IndyCar debut. While he finished 20th, he was only four laps off the lead lap.

Results are below.

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Dakar Stage 8 Highlights: Ricky Brabec blows engine, retires

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The motorcycle class of the Dakar Rally has been a seesaw affair through seven stages, but Ricky Brabec seemed poised to win the class for the USA. Until he blew an engine in Stage 8 that is – and gave up a more-than seven second lead. He was the second rider to retire after starting the stage as the leader. Joan Barreda retired in Stage 3.

Brabec was looking to become the first American rider to win in 27 years, but his fate was eerily similar to last year. Three days from the end of the stage, he retired about 50 kilometers into the stage, which is precisely when and where he retired in 2018.

With Brabec’s trouble, Toby Price leapfrogged from third to second in class despite riding with a metal pin in his wrist. In the world’s most grueling endurance event, it has never been more obvious that it isn’t over till it’s over.

Meanwhile, Nasser Al-Attiyah continues to run a consistent rally. With a 46 minute advantage over Nani Roma and Sebastien Loeb, all he needs to do is stay error free for the final two stages to win his third Dakar.

Here are some of the other highlights:

In the cars class, Sebastien Loeb scored his fifth stage win of the Rally by seven minutes over Nasser Al-Attiyah, but problems in Stage 3 have kept him from being competitive for the overall lead. … Jakub Przygonski earned his third podium of the Rally. All of these have been third-place finishes.

Class Leaders: Al-Attiyah holds an advantage of 46:29 over Roma and 46:45 over Loeb.

In motorcycles, Ricky Brabec’s blown engine opened up the class once more. … Matthias Walkner narrowly edged Pablo Quintanilla by 45 seconds. … But it was Toby Price’s third-place finish that helped elevate him to the class lead. … Sam Sunderland was supposed to blaze the path for the riders, but a malfunctioning navigation system kept him from rolling off first. Blazing the trail is a disadvantage and officials adjudged him to have tampered with his system to avoid that fate. Sunderland was penalized an hour to finish 35th on the stage. He dropped to ninth in class.

Class Leaders: Price inherited the lead over Quintanilla by 1:03 and 6:35 over Walkner

In side by sides, Francisco Lopez Contardo scored the victory over Cristian Baumgart by 4:47. … Gerard Farres Guell rounded out the top three.

Class Leaders: Contardo holds an advantage 0f 54:10 over Rodrigo Piazolli and one hour, 08:09 over Guell

In quads, there was no surprise in Nicolas Cavigliasso winning his seventh stage of the season. … He padded his overall advantage over Gustavo Gallego by more than nine minutes. … Jeremias Gonzalez Ferioli finished third.

Class Leaders: Cavigliasso holds and advantage of one hour, 24:52 over Ferioli and one hour, 44:04 over Gallego

In trucks, Dmitry Sotnikov won the stage to take over the class lead. He beat Ton Van Genugten by 22:01. … Siarhei Viazovich rounded out the top three. … Eduard Nikolaev lost the class lead by finishing eighth – nearly one hour behind Sotnikov.

Class Leaders: Sotnikov holds an advantage of 26:49 over and one hour, 7:43 over Gerard de Rooy

Stage Wins

Motorcycles
Sam Sunderland [2] (Stage 5 and 7), Matthias Walkner [2] (Stage 2 and 8), Joan Barreda [1] (Stage 1), Xavier de Soultrait [1] (Stage 3), Ricky Brabec [1] (Stage 4) and Pablo Quintanilla [1] (Stage 6)

Quads
Nicolas Cavigliasso [7] (Stage 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8) and Jeremias Gonzalez Ferioli [1] (Stage 3)

Cars
Sebastien Loeb [4] (Stage 2, 5, 6 and 8), Nasser Al-Attiyah [2] (Stage 1 and 4) and Stephane Peterhansel [2] (Stage 3 and 7)

Side-by-sides
Francisco Lopez Contardo [4] (Stage 2, 6, 7 and 8), Reinaldo Varela [1] (Stage 1), Gerard Farres Guell [1] (Stage 3), Sergei Kariakin [1] (Stage 4) and Rodrigo Piazzoli [1] (Stage 5)

Trucks
Eduard Nikolaev [3] (Stage 1, 2 and 5), Andrey Karginov [2] (Stage 3 and 4), Dmitry Sotnikov [2] (Stage 6 and 8) and Gerard de Rooy [1] (Stage 7)

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