Why Sunday’s IndyCar championship will be part-race, part-wrestling match

IndyCar
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Think of Wrestlemania on wheels.

That’s what Sunday’s season-ending – and more importantly, the 2018 Verizon IndyCar Series championship-deciding – Grand Prix of Sonoma (6:30 p.m. ET on NBCSN) is shaping up to be.

While there won’t be any sleeper holds or pile-drivers or cage matches, each of the four drivers still in contention for the IndyCar title will definitely have their hands full in their bid to end the day with one of them being anointed the series’ new champion.

The storylines are almost right out of the WWE playbook:

* Two grizzled veterans – four-time IndyCar champ Scott Dixon and former IndyCar champ and this year’s Indianapolis 500 winner Will Power – vs. two of IndyCar’s brightest young stars, defending series champion Josef Newgarden and 2016 Indy 500 winner Alexander Rossi.

* Power and Team Penske teammate Newgarden are the longest of longshots. The only way either driver can still claim the championship is to win the race, period.

* But even that may not be enough. Even though they’re still contenders mathematically, Power and Newgarden have to hope both Dixon and Rossi have something happen to their respective races and race cars – be it mechanical failure, a wreck or something else – early on for either Penske driver to overcome a massive 87-point deficit going into Sunday’s race.

* Speaking of mathematics, Dixon and Rossi need to finish last and second-to-last in the race for Newgarden or Power to have any realistic chance at having one of the greatest comebacks in IndyCar history.

* Also like the WWE, there’s plenty of global homeland pride in this race: Power from Australian and Dixon from New Zealand vs. young Americans Newgarden and Rossi. Get those flags ready, guys!

* For the 13th consecutive year, the IndyCar championship comes down to the final race of the season – as it should. However, sadly, this will also be the last IndyCar race at Sonoma Raceway for the immediate future. Laguna Seca has been awarded the season-ending race beginning in 2019. There is hope, particularly among the four contenders and most of their fellow racers, that the series will return to Sonoma again at some point in the near future.

* Instead of body slamming each other in the turns, this will be a race of finesse and inches. Sonoma Raceway is one of the tighter courses on the schedule, putting passing at a premium. It’s real easy to go into a turn thinking you have it made, only to wind up touching another car and resulting in potential game- and championship-changing outcomes. That’s why Saturday’s qualifying will be crucial for all drivers, but especially the four title hopefuls.

* Speaking of qualifying, while winning the race is the ultimate goal, Power and Newgarden have to qualify higher than Dixon and Rossi to go into Sunday’s race with some kind of advantage. Power leads the series with four poles (and 54 in his Indy car career) and is potentially staring at the most important pole opportunity of the season, if not his career.

* While Duane “The Rock” Johnson or “Stone Cold” Steve Austin or Mick “Mankind” Foley aren’t entered in the race, their style of wrasslin’ will likely be found in how each of the four contenders attack Sunday’s event. Like a wrestler scoping out his opponent, each contender will have to weigh risk vs. reward. Power and Newgarden have little to lose and everything to gain, so they can afford to be uber-aggressive, take chances they normally don’t take and make the race – and their opponents – come to them. For them, Sunday is not about worrying about points at all. They have just one thing on their agenda: as late Oakland Raiders owner Al Davis was famous for saying “Just Win, Baby!”

* On the flip side of that scenario, Dixon will likely have to be more defensive to stave off Rossi, who will have to go on the offensive if he hopes to pass Dixon for the championship, while also maintaining a semblance of defending against making a costly mistake. Both drivers’ race outcomes will be predicated on how many points they can earn. Dixon holds a 29-point edge on Rossi heading into Sunday. IndyCar is awarding double points to all drivers, meaning that the winner will receive 100 points for victory as opposed to the usual 50 points for a triumph.

* In addition, let’s not forget what could be the potential difference between championship and second-place in the final standings: the four bonus points available. Drivers can earn one point for leading a lap, another point for earning the pole position, and two points for leading the most laps.

* Spoiler alert, spoiler alert: If, late in the race, Power and Newgarden find themselves unlikely to win the race and resulting championship, that doesn’t mean their race or season is over. Rather, they can wind up playing a spoiler role to both Dixon and Rossi.

* This race also will be a time to bid adieu and say goodbye to Verizon as entitlement sponsor for the IndyCar Series. While efforts are ongoing to find a successor, Verizon’s positive impact upon the sport – particularly at a time where IndyCar has seen significant upward growth in the last few years – will be felt for years to come.

Well, that’s a quick synopsis of what potentially may happen in Sunday’s Grand Prix of Sonoma. Race fans – both attending in-person or watching on NBCSN – can expect an exciting and challenging championship race.

And while the contenders won’t be putting their opponents in sleeper holds or half-Nelson’s or clotheslining each other – at least we hope not – they’ll still be doing a lot of grappling for sure.

Of their steering wheel, of course. And who does that the best will be the one who wrestles the championship away.

Follow @JerryBonkowski

Cadillac confirms WEC driver lineup with Chip Ganassi Racing that will race Le Mans in 2023

Cadillac Ganassi Le Mans
Cadillac Racing
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Cadillac and Chip Ganassi Racing announced their driver lineup for a 2023 entry in the FIA World Endurance Championship, the sports car series that includes the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

The Cadillac V-LMDh entry will be driven by Earl Bamber and Alex Lynn, who were teamed on the No. 02 Cadillac that competed in the IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship DPi class this season and won the Twelve Hours of Sebring. The third driver will be Richard Westbrook, who will return to Ganassi after helping the team to a GT class win at Le Mans in 2018.

The team also will compete in the Rolex 24 at Daytona in the rebranded Grand Touring Prototype premier category, which is designed for crossover between the top prototypes in IMSA and WEC. Ganassi will field a second entry at Daytona with its No. 01 Cadillac that will compete full time in IMSA with Sebastien Bourdais and Renger van der Zande.

A Ganassi spokesman said the team hopes to run its second entry in the 2023 24 Hours of Le Mans but only its WEC team is confirmed (an AOC invitation would be required for the IMSA team). The team also is exploring options but currently plans to have the WEC’s team base of operations in Indianapolis.

Ganassi is the first American-based prototype team to confirm its entry in the 2023 24 Hours of Le Mans. It’s expected that Team Penske, which raced this year’s Le Mans with a full-time WEC entry in LMP2, also will race Le Mans with Porsche’s new LMDh car that is set for IMSA, but the manufacturer has yet to confirm its driver and team lineup.

Next year will mark the return of Cadillac to Le Mans for the first time since 2002.

Before joining Ganassi last year, Lynn made 28 WEC starts since 2016, winning the LMGTE Pro class at Le Mans in 2020.

“I’m absolutely thrilled to continue with Cadillac and Chip Ganassi Racing,” Lynn said in a release. “It’s a huge honor to drive for Chip in any capacity but certainly on a full factory sports car program, it’s seriously cool. Cadillac has so much heritage as a luxury North American sports car brand, so to be able to represent them is a huge privilege. I’ve had a lot of fun in my first year doing it and to continue that onto the World Endurance Championship stage is fantastic.

“For me, returning to WEC is sort of what I’ve always known and it’s a bit like going into my wheelhouse. This year in IMSA was a bit different with getting to know all-new circuits and a new style of racing so 2023 will be filled with a bit more of what I’m used to with more of a European focus. I think what’s significant about WEC is without a doubt Le Mans. As a sports car race, Le Mans is the crown jewel and everything that we want to win. To be able to take Chip Ganassi Racing and Cadillac back to Le Mans to fight for overall honors is a huge honor and that’s something that I’m going to work tirelessly to make sure we achieve.”

Bamber won the Le Mans overall in 2015 and ’17 with Porsche teams and also was a 2019 GTLM champion in IMSA.

“I am really happy to continue at Chip Ganassi Racing and Cadillac,” Bamber said in a release. “I’ve loved my first season in DPi and now to continue over into the LMDh era and WEC is super exciting. Looking forward to fighting for a world championship and another Le Mans victory.

“The World Endurance Championships gives us the opportunity to race at the world’s biggest race, which is Le Mans, the crown jewel of sports car racing. I’ve been lucky enough to win it before and it’s obviously a huge goal for Cadillac and everyone at Chip Ganassi Racing. To have that goal in sight is really exciting. It’s been great to have Alex as a teammate in 2022. We’ve been able to learn and grow together in the DPi, and we have a really good partnership going into WEC. We know each other really well and believe adding Richard will be a seamless transition.”

Said Westbrook: “After four really good years at Chip Ganassi Racing, I’ve got so many friends there and I’ve always dreamt to come back one day. It just worked so well between 2016 and 2019, and I’m delighted we found a route to come together again. I can’t wait, it’s an exciting era in sports car racing right now.

“I feel like I know Alex and Earl really well. I did Le Mans with Alex in 2020 and I’ve known him for years. It feels like I’m going back with an ex-teammate and exactly the same with Earl. Although I’ve never shared a car with Earl, we’ve always done the same sort of racing be it in WEC or in IMSA. We’ve had lots of battles, including this year in our dueling Cadillacs. We’ve always gotten along quite well, and I can say we’re going to have a great year together.”

The seven-race WEC season, which also includes a stop at Spa, will begin March 17 with the 1,000 Miles of Sebring at Sebring International Raceway in Florida.